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Lug nuts stuck, chewed up- problem solved!!

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  • Lug nuts stuck, chewed up- problem solved!!

    This isn't specifically about Studebakers, but it could be.
    I was trying to remove a wheel from a Jeep Comanche to fit a flat tire. The first lug nut I tried was on so tight that I couldn't loosen it with a 3/4" socket and a breaker bar. The next nut was so beat up that I couldn't even get a socket on it (the other three came loose ok). I suspect the numbXXXs that put on the rim last time used an impact wrench set to full power.
    They are chrome capped nuts.
    Any ideas how to get these suckers off?


    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
    '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
    '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
    Museum R-4 engine
    1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
    1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)
    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

  • #2
    A good nut cracker, may work.

    Comment


    • #3
      Paul, under similar circumstances, I have put all the nuts back on tight. Then take an impact wrench and remove the stuck ones first. Of course, if you don't have an impact wrench of your own, muscle is your option. I put mine on with a torque wrench, and remove them with the impact.

      John Clary
      Greer, SC
      SDC member since 1975
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

      Comment


      • #4
        Sorry, I didn't read close enough about the one you couldn't get the socket on. I have peeled the thin stainless caps off some lug nuts and hammered a (sometimes metric)socket on. If that don't work, you may have to remove the wheel from the spindle. Good luck!

        John Clary
        Greer, SC
        SDC member since 1975
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

        Comment


        • #5
          What jclary said has worked for me on the chrome ones. As I discovered on some Camaro lug nuts, removing the chrome covers will make them about 1/32" smaller. A 1/32 smaller socket or a metric may just fit.

          Skip Lackie
          Washington DC
          Skip Lackie

          Comment


          • #6
            Either peel off the chrome covers or get a 6-point socket and beat it on- all the way down, and square. If you don't care about the wheel finish, heat is your friiend. Expect the studs to snap off.

            Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
            Parish, central NY 13131

            "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

            "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"



            Comment


            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by bams50

              Either peel off the chrome covers or get a 6-point socket and beat it on- all the way down, and square. If you don't care about the wheel finish, heat is your friiend. Expect the studs to snap off.

              Robert (Bob) Andrews
              Ah, yes, Bob; spoken like a true, fellow experienced used-car dealer from the rust belt![:0][^] BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have always put a dab of silicone grease on the lugs, keeps the nut from rusting in place.
                I once read about the amount of torque can vary just by a drop of water on the threads, (lubricating them) and a drop of oil the nut turned another 1/2 turn or so.
                You might try a "cheap" under size socket and "beat" it on, and hopefully it will come off.

                Jim
                "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

                We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


                Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

                As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
                their Memorials!

                Comment


                • #9
                  You can get a socket that grips in loosening direction from the tool guys (snap-on, mac etc) that grips tighter counter clockwise. I usually strike the lug nuts straght on with a hammer and then loosen. That seems to work for me, and of course PB Blaster.






                  60 Hawk w/ 50 K miles

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Put all the lugs back on about a turn loose and start her up and do the forward reverse forward reverse dance. That'll stretch the other studs maybe just enough.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Paul,

                      Here's a good tool set for the rusty rounded bolts and nuts.
                      http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00910324000P

                      Jim Bradley
                      Lewistown PA
                      '78 Avanti II
                      Jim Bradley
                      Lake Monticello, VA
                      '78 Avanti II
                      sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

                        quote:Originally posted by bams50

                        Either peel off the chrome covers or get a 6-point socket and beat it on- all the way down, and square. If you don't care about the wheel finish, heat is your friiend. Expect the studs to snap off.

                        Robert (Bob) Andrews
                        Ah, yes, Bob; spoken like a true, fellow experienced used-car dealer from the rust belt![:0][^] BP
                        Yeah- and I also am pretty good at splitting lug nuts with a torch without damaging the stud threads. Same with blowing broken exhaust studs out of manifolds- again without ruining the threads.

                        All part of the joy of CNY winters

                        Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                        Parish, central NY 13131

                        "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

                        "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"



                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for all the great suggestions. As soon as it dries a little I may end trying a combination of most of them (truck is siting in my driveway and I can't move it easily). I don't have an impact wrench so I can't do that one. I used to have a nut cracker, but I haven't seen it for a while (notorious for losing tools). The lug nuts appear to be a mix of solid chromed ones (first one) and capped ones (second one). I'll use my Dremel cutter and try to peel the second one and I may be able to grind off the burrs enough to hammer a six-point socket on the first. I soaked the offending nuts with Deep Creep day before yesterday so hopefully that will help too. Rerun- those Sears Grip Tite sockets are neat. I'll check my Sears store first thing because I could use those a lot (rounded nuts are my style[:I]).

                          Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
                          '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                          '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                          '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                          Museum R-4 engine
                          1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
                          1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)
                          Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                          '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Excellent thoughts by everyone.

                            I'm in the rust belt, and I've dealt with the worst kinds of rusty nuts, and I've never had one beat me. I`d like to add a few things.

                            Rules:

                            (1) Never use a cheap socket wrench since it can break or slip and you can hit your hand hard. (don't ask me how I know) I recommend fixed, non-ratcheting type.
                            (2) Sometimes slightly tightening first, then loosening will work to break rust bond.
                            (3) Lots of rust penetrant AND TIME AND PATIENCE may be required.
                            (4) Any type of slippage should be avoided because the nut becomes harder to remove as the corners are taken off. (especially true on those door hinge Phillips screws)
                            (5) Watch for both left and right handed threads on any side of the car`s drums and make sure you are turning the right way. (sometimes they are reinstalled on the wrong wide)
                            (6) Use thread chasers to remove old rust once nut off.
                            (7) When reinstalling, I always use anti-seize compound.

                            My order of tool use is:

                            (1) Proper 6 point socket and breaker bar; (the longer the bar, the more leverage you have - a pipe added to the wrench can add length, but also increase danger.

                            (2) The Sears extractor socket set above. My set was only $25, and worth it.

                            (3) A plumbing torch to heat and break up rust.

                            (4) Grinding a new set of flats with a small grinder (i.e. grind a new six point size on the existing nut. Depending on accuracy, you can use a smaller socket or extractor.

                            (5) Grind opposite sides of nut off. If you are careful, you can save the stud. Once really close to the stud, a good, large, adjustable wrench will probably take it off. If not, replace the stud. My local parts store has all the sizes, studs, nuts, Ls & Rs, and different sizes. He said some sizes were getting hard to get. I`m not sure of the availability at our excellent Studebaker vendors.

                            Things I haven`t had much luck with include: Nutsplitters, cold chisels, air chisels, lack of patience and swearing. The first three seem to mess up the nut more without necessarily removing it, making it impossible to find something that will fit it.

                            Good luck, and happy driving.

                            Paul

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Go to your local phone book for a Myer's Tire Supply location. They stock a sockets with inside spirals. You drive the socket over the lug nut with a hammer. Then use and impact gun or large (1/2 or bigger) ratchet to loosen the lug nut.

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