Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Driveway Paint Job

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Body / Glass: Driveway Paint Job

    The one example my Father set for me was of a mindset that he could do anything.... Literally ! He had polio when he was 4 years old and wore 25 pounds of braces on his legs his whole life. He hated ADA when the law was enacted because it was premised on the word "Disability". He frequently said he was handicapped, not disabled.... and would then go on to say they handicap the fastest horses and the best golfers just to level the playing field. Polio was a personal challenge to him that he could do anything and everything that a person with two good legs could do. Thus my entire childhood I learned that can't was not in my vocabulary.

    With that background when I saved the Champ from the crusher I was determined to do everything myself.... engine, new floorboards, weld fender patches, bodywork, paint, upholstry etc... everything. I did have to call uncle on the 4th try and have my windshield man come help. Other than that, "I did build it myself"! Prior to that I had never welded, done upholstry or paint/body work.

    One of the most important things I learned in the process is that a driveway paint job isn't that hard or expensive. I cringe when I see any classic with an ugly faded finish and kick myself for some of the cars I've owned that looked that bad and could have been dressed up so easily. For a Mecum or Barrent/Jackson show car you probably still want to drop $10 grand for a perfect finish but for a daily driver for a couple hundred dollars you can easily produce a finish superior to Macco or Earl Scheib. Primer, degreaser and twice as much paint and clear coat as I needed on the Galaxie below totaled $386.

    The secret today is HVLP paint guns that you can buy for $15 at Harbor Freight and base, clear coat paint systems. Welding patch panels do complicate things a bit but the paint end of the project is not to be feared. Appropriate sanding, removal/masking of shiny and cleaning the surface with paint shop degreaser then lay down the base coat in multiple thin layers. The book calls for 10 minutes between coats so by the time I get around the car it's ready for one more coat... half a gallon of base and half a dozen trips around the car produces a finish as flat as your second grade blackboard. Half an hour for the base to flash and repeat the process with at least a half dozen coats of clear coat. Wet Sand the clear with 1000 grit, 1500 grit then 2000 or 2500 grit almost through the orange peel. Then get out the buffer and Mcguires heavy or medium cut and you will be amazed at your handy work.

    With the Champ done, we did a driveway paint job on this Galaxie 500 XL. Sorry about the brand but to make a point here is before during and after.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC03497.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	89.7 KB
ID:	1738995Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC03492.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	92.2 KB
ID:	1738996Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG1037.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	87.6 KB
ID:	1738998Click image for larger version

Name:	3t13I23qe5E95q65M7d67e5817b09cd9b1bfe.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	36.0 KB
ID:	1738999Click image for larger version

Name:	3r53Kd3Fe5N95Gb5q8d67409472d2e48412c3.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	33.2 KB
ID:	1738997
    Last edited by mmagic; 06-17-2013, 08:36 PM.

  • #2
    Looking good. I threatened my son that I would get the materials and practice on the Champ before doing his car.

    Comment


    • #3
      Doug, For $15 each, I keep separate guns for primer, base and clear, You choice is thin coats or runs. Then add just a touch of reducer to the last coat of clear and it will help level out the clear. For any runs, wrap 1500 grit around a piece of paint stick and wet sand carefully for 5 minutes. Always use an epoxy primer and once you think the primer is sanded perfectly smooth, go over the car 2 or 3 more times looking for issues. If you truly screw up a 5 inch spot, mask off, sand with 400 grit and re-shoot the entire panel... leave blending into old paint to the pros. Stick with a single paint system like PPG Shopcoat.

      I like to spray in the morning with very little breeze, on the drive with natural ventilation and great light.

      The beauty of HVLP guns is that they waste so little paint and require minimal air pressure.

      Comment


      • #4
        'Nice-looking, and no need to apologize for the brand. (Personally, I like most Fords from 1949-1964.)

        Congrats, and it sounds like your Dad was quite a guy. BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Contrary to my expectations, any Stude part is easier to source than a part for a '62 Ford Galaxie 500 XL convertible. As many parts on that car were only common to 2 years and the XL series any spares on dealer shelves were discarded years ago and they don't show up at pull and save. Even the windshield on the convertible is not common to the HT! Spent nearly a year looking for a windshield new or used!

          I didn't realize how spoiled I'd become restoring Cherokees and Studes when it came to getting the parts I need.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by mmagic View Post
            The one example my Father set for me was of a mindset that he could do anything.... Literally ! He had polio when he was 4 years old and wore 25 pounds of braces on his legs his whole life. He hated ADA when the law was enacted because it was premised on the word "Disability". He frequently said he was handicapped, not disabled.... and would then go on to say they handicap the fastest horses and the best golfers just to level the playing field. Polio was a personal challenge to him that he could do anything and everything that a person with two good legs could do. Thus my entire childhood I learned that can't was not in my vocabulary.

            With that background when I saved the Champ from the crusher I was determined to do everything myself.... engine, new floorboards, weld fender patches, bodywork, paint, upholstry etc... everything. I did have to call uncle on the 4th try and have my windshield man come help. Other than that, "I did build it myself"! Prior to that I had never welded, done upholstry or paint/body work.

            One of the most important things I learned in the process is that a driveway paint job isn't that hard or expensive. I cringe when I see any classic with an ugly faded finish and kick myself for some of the cars I've owned that looked that bad and could have been dressed up so easily. For a Mecum or Barrent/Jackson show car you probably still want to drop $10 grand for a perfect finish but for a daily driver for a couple hundred dollars you can easily produce a finish superior to Macco or Earl Scheib. Primer, degreaser and twice as much paint and clear coat as I needed on the Galaxie below totaled $386.

            The secret today is HVLP paint guns that you can buy for $15 at Harbor Freight and base, clear coat paint systems. Welding patch panels do complicate things a bit but the paint end of the project is not to be feared. Appropriate sanding, removal/masking of shiny and cleaning the surface with paint shop degreaser then lay down the base coat in multiple thin layers. The book calls for 10 minutes between coats so by the time I get around the car it's ready for one more coat... half a gallon of base and half a dozen trips around the car produces a finish as flat as your second grade blackboard. Half an hour for the base to flash and repeat the process with at least a half dozen coats of clear coat. Wet Sand the clear with 1000 grit, 1500 grit then 2000 or 2500 grit almost through the orange peel. Then get out the buffer and Mcguires heavy or medium cut and you will be amazed at your handy work.

            With the Champ done, we did a driveway paint job on this Galaxie 500 XL. Sorry about the brand but to make a point here is before during and after.
            [ATTACH=CONFIG]24771[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]24772[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]24774[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]24775[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]24773[/ATTACH]
            Where did you get your basic supplies? So far, I have spent more than $300 on sandpaper, stripper, razor blades, masking tape, and body filler.

            Comment


            • #7
              Nice going for your dad. The Galaxie looks terrific. I wish I had that talent.

              Rog
              '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
              Smithtown,NY
              Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

              Comment


              • #8
                I get most supplies from Painter Supply in Denver, a PPG supplier to the body shop trade. They've done a terrific job on finding the numbers and matching vintage vehicle colors. I'll never use single stage paint again for an exterior. But, both PS and NAPA have mixed single stage in rattle cans for me for spot work like painting a dash or engine side inner fenders where I only needed a small area at a time for about $15 a can.

                I separate primer through buffing from body work. Body work materials can cost from dollars to thousands depending on how sick the car was to start.... just buy materials like sand paper in bulk from a body shop supply shop and keep the Bondo very,very thin. Cheap air sanders and tools from Harbor freight are well worth the investment for me.

                When I was flipping Cherokees I'd hire the painting.. With the Champ I figured it was just a truck so I'd do it all for brag. Now I kick myself for paying someone to paint all those hoods and fenders.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm really impressed with your work. Plus what a GREAT dad you had too. He is part of the equation that made America great.
                  1942 Packard Clipper Custom Touring Sedan * 1952 Studebaker Champion Regal * 1954 Studebaker Commander Regal Starlight * 1967 Thunderbird Hdtp * 1969 Continental Mark III * 1969 Mercury Marquis convertible * 1972 Buick Riviera * 1973 Continental Mark IV * 1978 Glass Top Lincoln Town Car * 1983 Mercedes 300SD * 1986 Dodge RAM 4WD * 1999 Infiniti Q45

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nice stuff indeed!!!

                    I teaches my wife how to do good paint-work with just a roller & brush & now she's amazingly good at it, much better than me (more determent), so with the right kind of stuff & concentration you can do wonders...!
                    [SIGPIC]
                    Josephine,
                    -55 sedan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You can also use the driveway paint booth, also known as a couple of EZ-up's and plastic...
                      The overnight wait, where you can also use the plastic to keep stuff off the cleaned surface...



                      and the "booth", plastic all over the place while you spray..
                      '53 Commander
                      Art Morrison chassis
                      LS6 ASA/4L60E

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Nice work ... I just prefer to sand out any bugs rather than risk visiqueen blowing into my work!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Nice work and car. I am a little biased; learned to drive on a '63 Galaxie.
                          1957 Studebaker Champion 2 door. Staten Island, New York.

                          "Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think." -Albert Einstein

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you paint outside and the sun is shinning brightly on your work, it can cause some really dull results. The paint dries too fast in the hot sun, and turns very dull. Of course, since you say you always color sand and polish, maybe that is not too big a problem. I once painted a pickup with single part paint outside, and the side in the shade looked a really different color than the side in the sun... But, that was single part paint...
                            Corley

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Corley View Post
                              If you paint outside and the sun is shinning brightly on your work, it can cause some really dull results.
                              I like to paint in the morning when it's cool, no hard sun light, few bugs and little breeze. Have an older friend who had a body shop... His work was always dirty just from dust generally in the air.... and he didn't change the filters on the booth too often. Now that he sold the shop we have him painting outside at the farm and his work is much better.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X