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  • avantilover
    replied
    I had no intention of installing one now, had thought if it came to a rebuild I might but it seems rather a hassle for a cruisng car that is basically running well. Sounded interesting but I should have guessed it was only for the Big 3.

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  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    Jack -
    And yes, a roller cam and lifters will fit and work in the Studebaker V8.
    Well...maybe not....
    If Toms or my heads are used to their full extent, a different design lobe (smaller base circle) needs to be designed without having the lifter fall out of the lifter bore...!

    Avanti -
    Yea, if you aren't going wild with other parts in the Stude engine, unfortunatly, at this point in time, it's not like an early Chevrolet, Ford, Chrysler engine where roller cams are already made and used daily...AND are "sorta/kinda" cheap.

    Mike

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  • avantilover
    replied
    Thanks guys, I'm not considering this as I only saw it yesterday and my car is OK, it seemed a good idea but once again if you have a GM, Chrysler or Ford all is available we independent folks get shafted again.

    Just heard my Ford Dealer is shutting it's night service tonight and I have to retreive my Lark (probably unsorted) so don't know what to do as I'm not a mechanic and don't wish to be.

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    "I would suggest to all readers who are considering an engine build to move up to one of the many new roller hydraulic cams offered for older engines. They make power like a freight train, idle slow and smooth with excellent vacuum, and remove all of the concern about zinc in the oil. I would not build an engine today - even in a restoration - with a flat-tappet cam. Roller hydraulic is the way to go."
    Yes, as the OP cites, it would be wonderful to have the choice of a hydraulic roller cam and kit for the street and a solid lifter kit for racing. And yes, a roller cam and lifters will fit and work in the Studebaker V8.

    No, it is unlikely to happen soon. Today, the only way to get to a roller cam is a custom order; the cam, lifters, springs, retainers, roller rockers and pushrods will total about $2500.

    Maybe, since you are in OZ, you might ask around. IIRC, even there the couple of custom cam grinders have looked at the project, but haven't seen enough volume and profit to go forward with it.

    FWIW, to make the freight-train power tantalizingly mentioned by Mr. Bohacz, also budget $2500 for professional head and valve work. There's no point in opening the valves quicker and higher if the intake port won't handle any more flow.

    jack vines

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  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    As Jeff sorta says...currently, there are no outlets, for easy to get Stude roller cams.
    I think there is one seller who "may" build a few, but as of yet, I've not got confermation from them.

    Both the cams and lifers will not be cheap. Probably in the $700 to $900 range, then add in the cost of new pushrods...!
    Then there is the distributer drive. If a roller cam is made it NEEDS to have a cast iron drive gear pressed into the back of the cam to make the distributer gear live a long happy life.

    THEN.......to make all of this work and money worth it....you have to sit down and pick a cam grind (lobe shape) to both, work within the Stude block confines AND to take advantage of todays cam design technology. The regular Stude guy most likely won't have this information at hand..!

    As one might surmise...it's not nearly as easy as it sounds.

    Mike

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    We've been kicking this around over on Sonny's Racing Studebaker's forum for several years.
    Yes, there are some advantages to a roller cam (and lifters) to reduce frictional HP losses.
    One big reason is the change in oil to remove the ZDDP.
    The OEM's mostly went this way to get away from flat tappets for this reason.
    But......
    In the Stude world our choices (right now) are limited, and expensive.
    We have had several cam manufacturers say they would make up roller cam blanks....for fairly substantial bucks, or big quantities.
    Who wants to commit to a hundred cam blanks, or a thousand cam blanks?
    Then you need the hydraulic roller lifters. You will need a Chrysler, or AMC roller lifter, and then you will need to make your own lifter alignment plates.
    (or hodgepodge them out of some other roller lifter parts).
    There are one or two people that will build you a cam, to your spec....for big dollars.
    And if you do have an 'all billet' cam built, you will need a bronze cam gear for the distributor.
    Some of the early/existing billet roller cams have the rear cam bearing and gear section cut off (bored out) of a stock Stude cam, and press (and weld) it onto the billet portion of the cam.
    This negates the bronze gear necessity, which is good because a Stude bronze gear is a custom machined part (read that $$$)
    Right now...today... there are several roller cams that have been built that are floating around and they are sold, re-sold, and re-re-sold and treated with great reverence.
    But even these are limited in that they are a fixed lift, overlap, and duration, so you are stuck with what they are.
    But your question is a good one, and one that stirs the soul of mortal Stude people everywhere.
    But it will take the opening of the Studewallet to make it happen.
    ( But, but, but....there's always a but...)
    If you can help us all make this happen, I'm in for a couple!
    Jeff

    Originally posted by avantilover View Post
    On page 81 of the October 2011 Hemmings Muscle Machines Ray Bohacz writes in response to a fellow with a cam question ....

    "I would suggest to all readers who are considering an engine build to move up to one of the many new roller hydraulic cams offered for older engines. They make power like a freight train, idle slow and smooth with excellent vacuum, and remove all of the concern about zinc in the oil. I would not build an engine today - even in a restoration - with a flat-tappet cam. Roller hydraulic is the way to go."

    Now I'm wondering whether such an item will fit in a Studebaker V8 and the thoughts of the mechanical types on list who know these things.

    Comments anyone?
    Last edited by DEEPNHOCK; 09-07-2011, 05:46 AM.

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  • avantilover
    started a topic Engine: Roller Hydraulic Camshaft

    Roller Hydraulic Camshaft

    On page 81 of the October 2011 Hemmings Muscle Machines Ray Bohacz writes in response to a fellow with a cam question ....

    "I would suggest to all readers who are considering an engine build to move up to one of the many new roller hydraulic cams offered for older engines. They make power like a freight train, idle slow and smooth with excellent vacuum, and remove all of the concern about zinc in the oil. I would not build an engine today - even in a restoration - with a flat-tappet cam. Roller hydraulic is the way to go."

    Now I'm wondering whether such an item will fit in a Studebaker V8 and the thoughts of the mechanical types on list who know these things.

    Comments anyone?
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