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  • Engine: Here we go again!!!

    I was in a local auto repair shop today and an elderly gentleman suggested that the 289 engine in my GT Hawk was built by FORD. Of course he did not believe me so I pushed the issue by telling him that the early Cadillac V8's were more aligned to the Studebaker engines.

    Can anybody give us here a complete genealogy of the Studebaker engines so that in the future we can correct our misguided brethrens.
    Peter Bishop
    Director,
    Northeast Zone

  • #2
    Originally posted by PeterHawk View Post
    I was in a local auto repair shop today and an elderly gentleman suggested that the 289 engine in my GT Hawk was built by FORD. Of course he did not believe me so I pushed the issue by telling him that the early Cadillac V8's were more aligned to the Studebaker engines.

    Can anybody give us here a complete genealogy of the Studebaker engines so that in the future we can correct our misguided brethrens.
    It's probably not a bad idea to post the data but I find that most folks that bring up the Ford thing are only making conversation and could not give a rat's patoot about the genesis of the engine nor care to be corrected. I've found it much easier to just mention that Studebaker did cast there own blocks and let it die. Much less angst at the shows.

    Remember, When arguing with an Idiot, he'll bring you down to his level and then beat you with experience.

    Bob

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    • #3
      I always tell people that seem to be in the "know" about Studebakers, that Studebaker had been building 289 engines much earlier
      than Furd has.
      That usually ends the "know it all" conversation and sometimes turns into a question and answer conversation.
      George King
      Grants Pass, Oregon
      64 Station Wagon with fixed roof (Canadian Car)

      66 Station Wagon with fixed roof. Project car, complete For Sale...

      64 Wagonaire sliding roof South Bend car. For Sale...

      63 GT Hawk

      51 Champion Starlight Coupe For Sale...

      Comment


      • #4
        IIRC.....Ford's first OHV V8 was a 239 made in 1954.....

        Originally posted by Orestudeguy View Post
        I always tell people that seem to be in the "know" about Studebakers, that Studebaker had been building 289 engines much earlier
        than Furd has.
        That usually ends the "know it all" conversation and sometimes turns into a question and answer conversation.
        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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        • #5
          Jeff, wouldn't that be a Y-8?????
          Jamie McLeod
          Hope Mills, NC

          1963 Lark "Ugly Betty"
          1958 Commander "Christine"
          1964 Wagonaire "Louise"
          1955 Commander Sedan
          1964 Champ
          1960 Lark

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          • #6
            I was talking about the 289 ci engine, not the first V/8's...
            Most of the conversation's I have heard from people is that they are referring to the 289 Ford engine, not the first V/8
            George King
            Grants Pass, Oregon
            64 Station Wagon with fixed roof (Canadian Car)

            66 Station Wagon with fixed roof. Project car, complete For Sale...

            64 Wagonaire sliding roof South Bend car. For Sale...

            63 GT Hawk

            51 Champion Starlight Coupe For Sale...

            Comment


            • #7
              Bumped to restate the request: Can anybody define the evolution of the OHV Studebaker engines?
              Peter Bishop
              Director,
              Northeast Zone

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              • #8
                Thats really easy Peter. The Studebaker V-8, although had some things in common in looks with the Cadillac, was mostly different, such as solid vs. hydraulic lifters ect. The Caddy came out in 1949, Studebaker in 1951 & the Ford V-8 in 1954, although it had nothing in common with the engine Ford later came out with that was the supposed engine Studebaker used, the small block 289 in late 1963 (64 model year). By that time the Studebaker 289 had been in production for 7 years (1957 model year). I would ask then when was the last time you saw a Ford 289 with the distributor in the back?
                59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                64 Zip Van
                66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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                • #9
                  There are many other coincidental engine sizes as well.
                  Look at all of the 350's , Chevy,Olds , Pontiac , Buick , Chrysler.
                  327 , AMC , Chevy , Packard
                  307 Chevy , Olds
                  260 Ford , Olds
                  And many more. I've challenged a couple of loud mouths to interchange any major part of 289 Ford to Stude for $500 , and they fade.
                  BTW the first Ford OHV V8 was the 239 which was the first in the Y block series that became the 272 , 292 , 312 etc . It was not an evolution
                  of the Flathead.
                  Last edited by shifter4; 06-29-2011, 04:10 AM. Reason: omission
                  Bill H
                  Daytona Beach
                  SDC member since 1970
                  Owner of The Skeeter Hawk .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Warren Webb View Post
                    Thats really easy Peter. The Studebaker V-8, although had some things in common in looks with the Cadillac, was mostly different, such as solid vs. hydraulic lifters ect. The Caddy came out in 1949, Studebaker in 1951 & the Ford V-8 in 1954, although it had nothing in common with the engine Ford later came out with that was the supposed engine Studebaker used, the small block 289 in late 1963 (64 model year). By that time the Studebaker 289 had been in production for 7 years (1957 model year). I would ask then when was the last time you saw a Ford 289 with the distributor in the back?
                    Warren, I like the distributor info and I'll use it as a retort. I still would like to know the evolution of the Stude 289. I know its predecessor was the 259 but what came before the 259 and were the earlier sizes machined from the same original forged casting?
                    Peter Bishop
                    Director,
                    Northeast Zone

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                    • #11
                      were the earlier sizes machined from the same original forged casting?

                      It was a casting, not a forging, only the crank was forged.

                      Well, lets put it this way. All the sizes, 232, 224, 259, 289 and 304 were all machined from the same basic casting, first made in 1951 as the 232. Not that the casting wasn't changed, but it is today possible to bore and stroke a 232 to become a 289.

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                      • #12
                        You're on the right track, Peterhawk. The 232 was underbored for half a year in 55 to a 224, then bored again to the 259 in 55. In 57 it was stroked to the 289 and then you could get it supercharged! All the same block, as far as I know. The R series came later and you could bore the block to 304.? before water jacket limits required sleeving the cylinders. I'm sure someone will provide more detail.
                        Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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                        • #13
                          Thanks to all for the clarifictions. Now I have the info for the next uninformed critic.
                          Peter Bishop
                          Director,
                          Northeast Zone

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                          • #14
                            Wasn't the 289 available in the 1956 President ?
                            South Lompoc Studebaker

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                            • #15
                              If I remember right, the Sky Hawk, in '56 had a 289 engine. It certainly would have been at least an option in the President.

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