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  • Engine: oil pan gaskets replacement

    can the oil pan gasket on a 60 hawk 289 be replaced while moyor is in the car? how about timing gear cover?

  • #2
    Both Jobs certainly CAN be done In the Car, but you MAY wish you had pulled the Engine.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #3
      I agree with Rich, I am in the middle of the process right now. Ready for the pan to go in in the morning. It is a real PITA! Next time, the motor will come out! Lol. Wish me luck on no leaks! 😉

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      • #4
        This guy has good videos on a total overhaul on the studebaker 289. This is the timing cover and pan install video (on engine stand)
        hope this is allowed to post...
        https://youtu.be/H-JqZ2M7Aq0

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        • #5
          I agree! It took me an hour to remove the engine in my Hawk, and an hour to put it back. It was a bitch to replace the pan gasket even with the engine out and upside down. I can't imagine trying to do it in the car. Besides, it gives you the opportunity to clean and paint the engine compartment, and engine. Also, while its out you can remove and replace the core plugs (freeze plugs) and clean out the water jackets; I got a quart of crud out of mine. I used brass Ford small block replacememt plugs, they were cheap. I also used a sealer called "The right stuff" for the pan, it was recomended here and is great, but very messy, and not cheap. While you have the pan off, it's a good idea to straighten and reinfiorce the flange. I used 1"x .125" flat bar. It's been a year or two and no sign of any leaks.
          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_0833.JPG Views:	0 Size:	138.2 KB ID:	1830381Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_0835.JPG Views:	0 Size:	104.8 KB ID:	1830382

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          • #6
            I have done it both ways on Larks and now refer to pull the engine and fix ALL leaks freeze lugs etc.. Even with the car on a hoist, it is not easy.
            Bob
            Bob
            Welland Ontario
            60 Lark Convertible
            64 Daytona
            sigpic
            "They were meant to be driven ... so keep on cruizin"

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            • #7
              I've done a couple V8 pan gaskets with the engine in the car, working off a concrete floor, no lift and found putting a car jack with a piece of wood between the jack and the pan helped to keep the pan up in place while getting the pan bolts started helped. Don't forget about the rear main seal, which requires more work, but the time to do it is when the pan is removed anyway. There are instructions for the rear seal in the service manual and threads here on the forum (as a minimum do the lower rear main seal, it's relatively easy, the upper one can be a bear to get out and back in and is more work).
              Dan Peterson
              Montpelier, VT
              1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
              1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

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              • #8
                When I had my engine out for a refresh this winter I put it together on an engine stand. Once back in about 20 minutes into it's initial run the SOB started leaking. I had also repainted, so I was not in the mood to pull the engine again. I did it in the truck. Trucks are easier and I have a lift. The second time was the charm no leaks!
                1962 Champ

                51 Commander 4 door

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                • #9
                  I have replaced far more oil pan gaskets with motor in the car than out, including 56J's Packard 352, and Studebaker 259/289. It takes me about 3-4 hours to pull a motor, and 8 hours to reinstall it. I prefer to have all four wheels up on ramps, with dual 4x4s under each tire for evermore height (wish I had a lift). I use a creeper, it is messy, and a PITA, but I take my time and have learned a few tricks along the way. I once had the same oil pan off a 56J about 3-4 times because I could not get the rear main seal to stop leaking after installing a HiPo, 1990s GM oil pump and a modern, neoprene seal for 1980s-90s GM. Eventually I got it all sorted out, and the GM pump and seal work great, but what a PITA that learning curve was! I hope to never have to change another oil pan gasket, but if I had to change one tomorrow, would not pull the motor just for the sake of changing the oil pan gasket/rear main seal. JMHO

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kurt View Post
                    When I had my engine out for a refresh this winter I put it together on an engine stand. Once back in about 20 minutes into it's initial run the SOB started leaking. I had also repainted, so I was not in the mood to pull the engine again. I did it in the truck. Trucks are easier and I have a lift. The second time was the charm no leaks!
                    That happened to me once with a Stude V8, the machinist had cracked the block while removing the rear 1/4" pipe threaded coolant drain plug. Neither of knew it was cracked till I had it all back together, in the car, and fired it up. Had to swap blocks and do everything all over again. Talk about a PITA!

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                    • #11
                      Crazy thing was I couldn’t find anything wrong. It leaked like A sieve. Anyway, I redid the seal and pan gasket and so far it is dry.
                      1962 Champ

                      51 Commander 4 door

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                      • #12
                        I have heard that installing the Rear Main Seal in Backwards will do that.
                        StudeRich
                        Second Generation Stude Driver,
                        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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