Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lark leaf springs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Frame / Springs: Lark leaf springs

    Are there any other Studebakers (or alternative vehicles) that use the same leaf springs as my 63 Lark Daytona
    My rear springs are a little saggy and the rear end sits a little too low. I have been scouring ebay US and there are a lot of springs listed and many will ship to the UK. However I can't find a listing specifically for the Lark. Studebaker International list the Lark springs but I can't quite run to $550 plus shipping. I've spent a lot of money on the car lately but my Mrs has just lost her job so I've got to watch the pennies a little until she finds employment.

    Any help much appreciated,
    Steve.
    The funniest thing about this signature is by the time you realise it says nothing important, it's too late to stop reading it.

  • #2
    Most all Studebaker cars '58 - 66 use a version of the same spring.

    If money is a problem right now, an option is to go to what you Brits used to refer to as a "breaker's yard." Find any car, van or truck with a leaf spring the same width as the Studebaker. Buy both springs for scrap price, cut off the eye from the main leaf and insert it under the Studebaker main leaf. That will stiffen it up enough, you may decide it's good enough to live with.

    jack vines
    PackardV8

    Comment


    • #3
      Dodge Chargers and other E bodied Chryslers of the late 60's and early 70' used the same spring as the Stude, short in front and longer in back. The only leaf that won't just bolt in is the main leaf, it is 2+ inches longer.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
        Most all Studebaker cars '58 - 66 use a version of the same spring.

        If money is a problem right now, an option is to go to what you Brits used to refer to as a "breaker's yard." Find any car, van or truck with a leaf spring the same width as the Studebaker. Buy both springs for scrap price, cut off the eye from the main leaf and insert it under the Studebaker main leaf. That will stiffen it up enough, you may decide it's good enough to live with.

        jack vines
        I'm pretty sure the Lark spring is shorter than the Hawk springs. At least the extra set of Stude springs I got with the Lark I had are. I was told they were for the Lark.

        Your breaker yard plan is a good one. I took three sets of springs from various vehicles and built a set of 1 ton springs for the rear of my '81/'82/'83 Toyota flat bed dually a few decades ago. It worked great! (re; '81/'82/'83. The cab was made from 3 wrecked cabs; '81 from firewall forward, left half of cabin '82, right half '83. Much like now, I had more time than money then.)
        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Bring the springs to a spring shop and have then re- arced

          Comment


          • #6
            I think I'll measure up the springs and see what will fit. I have contacted a couple of companies about re-arching, unfortunately none of the companies I found here in the UK will give quotes until they've pulled the springs apart. Fair enough, I understand there may be broken leaves etc. But they won't give a guide price for the basic "disassemble, re-arch, reassemble" job. I hate that because it's a case of "once I have your springs and pulled them apart, your'e f***ed mate!!" and the price can be pulled from a hat. I know I'm unfairly mistrusting a trade before I've used them but after buying my car from a trader and finding hell knows how many faults and bodges to put right (listed many on a previous thread about my car should never have passed a UK MOT test) I'd rather know what I'm roughly going to pay out. I've already spent a lot of time and money correcting a car that was meant to be ready to go. The British are meant to be a polite, honest and trustworthy bunch. Agreed.....until it comes to the motor trade.
            The funniest thing about this signature is by the time you realise it says nothing important, it's too late to stop reading it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Adding a leaf could be just what you need. I did that on my Commander and love the result. It not only raised the rear about an inch, but also stiffened the ride just a bit.
              "In the heart of Arkansas."
              Searcy, Arkansas
              1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
              1952 2R pickup

              Comment


              • #8
                I think adding a leaf what I'll do and see how it goes. Thanks guys.
                The funniest thing about this signature is by the time you realise it says nothing important, it's too late to stop reading it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I re-arched the leaf springs on my 53 a few months ago. I took my time and am happy with the results.

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYWfYyYQ2kA&app=desktop

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HImEhw1UUoQ&app=desktop
                  64 Champ long bed V8
                  55/53 Studebaker President S/R
                  53 Hudson Super Wasp Coupe

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Options exist that do not require removing/disassembling the springs. There are "helper springs" available that clamp onto the existing spring. They do not require taking the spring apart. Some do not alter ride height (having a delayed point of contact) and others do. A popular 60's/70's alteration was to use extended shackles at the rear to raise the car to clear wide tires. However that changes the pinion angle and possibly roll steer. There is also the option of air shocks. Using a dual rather than single tube will allow for adjustments independently.

                    As to springs from other cars keep in mind that leaf springs have some form of a locator (often a pin) for the rear axle. So even if the spring is of the correct length, the locator may not be in the proper location.
                    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by wittsend View Post
                      A popular 60's/70's alteration was to use extended shackles at the rear to raise the car to clear wide tires. However that changes the pinion angle and possibly roll steer.
                      Only if taken to the extreme as was typical then. If only enough longer to to return the vehicle to factory ride height, no I'll effects will be had. Remember too, there is a designed opperational range from the factory. As long as you remain within that range, factory design performance can be expected.
                      sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The 65/66/67/68 Mustangs use the same width springs. I have a friend who restores Mustangs and always has plenty of excess spring for me to disassemble and cut to fit Treblig

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          One thing I might add to my previous post. Try to get a spring with the centering hole where you can use it as is. The only springs I had at had at hand were from a 62 Lark. Since my car is a 52, the spring center was different and I had to drill new holes. Not too bad, but unnecessary if you get the right springs.
                          Just cut the main leaf slightly shorter than the main leaf on your car, raise the car safely, unbolt the spring pack, slide in the extra leaf and re-tighten everything. No need to remove the spring from the shackles. I had some longer center bolts, but found I didn't need them. I also used new spring clamps from a Mustang that I had on hand.
                          "In the heart of Arkansas."
                          Searcy, Arkansas
                          1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                          1952 2R pickup

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X