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HVA Article - Studebaker First Muscle Car?

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  • HVA Article - Studebaker First Muscle Car?

    Check out this interesting article from the HVA:
    https://www.historicvehicle.org/stud...t-muscle-cars/
    Last edited by Commander Eddie; 10-14-2016, 12:36 PM.
    Ed Sallia
    Dundee, OR

    Sol Lucet Omnibus

  • #2
    Originally posted by Commander Eddie View Post
    Check out this interesting article from the HVA:
    https://www.historicvehicle.org/stud...t-muscle-cars/
    Great article. Well worth reading.

    Stu Chapman

    Comment


    • #3
      I enjoyed the read but the definition it seems of a muscle car was a compact two and four door car offered along with the respective manufacturers intermediate and full size two and four door family sedans. The V8 engines from the bigger lines were installed into their compact offerings. The 57 Rambler Rebel with the 260 V8 was AMC's stand alone compact offering with electronic fuel injection and is considered to be the first muscle car based on the definition. The 59' Lark compact offered the 259 V8 years before the "big three" offered a V8 in their compacts but the full size and intermediates were no longer being produced by Studebaker. Later on, the personal segment (Mustang, Camaro, Firebird and the like) came along and these can indeed be compared to the 53' Starliner.

      Comment


      • #4
        The HVA article was interesting and well-done, but the discussion over who had the first muscle car will likely continue after all of us are dead and gone.

        Tony (Post #3), the new-for-mid-year 1956 AMC V8 was never offered at 260 cubic inches. It was introduced at 250 cubic inches mid-year and grew to 327 cubic inches for 1957 Rambler Rebels, Nash Ambassadors, and Hudson Hornets. It was also offered later at 287 cubic inches, and was phased out by the end of the 1966 model year.

        An excellent book was published in 2007 devoted to the unique and incredibly fast 1957 Rebel: The Amazing Rambler Rebel, by William H. Lenharth. I have a copy here; an excellent read.

        Regarding the Bendix Electrojector fuel injection system planned for the 327 Rebel, Mr. Lenworth states,

        [Due to developmental problems that were never resolved (my preface; a conclusion of many of his paragraphs], "There has been discussion about how many Rebels [actually] received the Bendix Electrojector system. The number appears to be somewhere between six and zero, although the official number is zero.However, in several factory photo display models, Rebels are shown with a fuel-injection engine. One could assume that at least one show car must have received the fuel injection system." BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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        • #5
          This brings to question since the Jet Streak kit made it to a parts number, certainly one was built even if never released for production . That would certainly be the true definition of a muscle car! Imagine tooling down the road in a 374 twin 4bbl Isky cammed solid lifter Golden Hawk!
          Bez Auto Alchemy
          573-318-8948
          http://bezautoalchemy.com


          "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

          Comment


          • #6
            To me, this is a very enjoyable and well written article. Plain, matter of fact, information, no negative or outlandish "know-it-all" attitude from the author. Kind to Studebaker, and its competitors. While the title might indicate an attitude of "argument" was to come in the reading, I see nothing that looks like a "hill to die on" point of argument established by the author. Instead, he laid out a sequence of facts, and allows the reader to reflect and develop his own conclusions.

            The fact that he mentions a number of vehicles that followed, the Studebaker trend... this article (to me), presented all in a positive way. I leaves you with a sad tug of heartfelt emotion regarding the end of Studebaker auto production, instead of condemnation so often presented.

            I'll leave the discussion (about who was first) to you true "car fans." But as a "Studebaker fan," I enjoyed reading this article that validated some of my knowledge, and reinforced my grasp of time perspective and sequence. Thanks Ed for posting the link.
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

            Comment


            • #7
              Many think that the first muscle car was the late-30s (1937?) Buick Century, which paired the smaller Buick body with the large OHV straight-8 from the larger Buick body.
              -Dwight FitzSimons

              Comment


              • #8
                Well this brings a question, what car was the first to be an S/S car in NHRA? Where Muscle cars began. Answer, 1956 Studebaker Golden Hawk
                Last edited by clonelark; 10-16-2016, 08:40 AM.
                101st Airborne Div. 326 Engineers Ft Campbell Ky.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                  The HVA article was interesting and well-done, but the discussion over who had the first muscle car will likely continue after all of us are dead and gone.

                  Tony (Post #3), the new-for-mid-year 1956 AMC V8 was never offered at 260 cubic inches. It was introduced at 250 cubic inches mid-year and grew to 327 cubic inches for 1957 Rambler Rebels, Nash Ambassadors, and Hudson Hornets. It was also offered later at 287 cubic inches, and was phased out by the end of the 1966 model year.

                  An excellent book was published in 2007 devoted to the unique and incredibly fast 1957 Rebel: The Amazing Rambler Rebel, by William H. Lenharth. I have a copy here; an excellent read.

                  Regarding the Bendix Electrojector fuel injection system planned for the 327 Rebel, Mr. Lenworth states,

                  [Due to developmental problems that were never resolved (my preface; a conclusion of many of his paragraphs], "There has been discussion about how many Rebels [actually] received the Bendix Electrojector system. The number appears to be somewhere between six and zero, although the official number is zero.However, in several factory photo display models, Rebels are shown with a fuel-injection engine. One could assume that at least one show car must have received the fuel injection system." BP
                  Thanks for the 327 info. My source said 250 for the 57 Rebel. (260 was my typo) In any event the 57' Rebel fits the criterion for the definition of muscle car as is universally accepted. I agree that GM, Ford-Mercury, and Chrysler fans will argue 'till the end of time perhaps due to embarrassment but it seems obvious to me the Rebel was first based on the definition and time line.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As I understand the definition (big engine in a smaller, lighter body) the '56 Golden Hawk qualifies as a muscle car. And, it precedes the '57 Rebel by a year. But, Chrysler people would also argue for the '55 Chrysler 300. And, Buick people will argue for the late-30's Buick Century. Do you remember why it was named the Century? Because it could hit 100 MPH. So, Buick was thinking performance even in the late 30's.
                    -Dwight FitzSimons, Editor, GVC chapter

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dwight FitzSimons View Post
                      As I understand the definition (big engine in a smaller, lighter body) the '56 Golden Hawk qualifies as a muscle car. And, it precedes the '57 Rebel by a year. But, Chrysler people would also argue for the '55 Chrysler 300. And, Buick people will argue for the late-30's Buick Century. Do you remember why it was named the Century? Because it could hit 100 MPH. So, Buick was thinking performance even in the late 30's.
                      -Dwight FitzSimons, Editor, GVC chapter
                      Yep, we discussed all those cars here: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...not-Studebaker

                      Craig

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
                        This brings to question since the Jet Streak kit made it to a parts number, certainly one was built even if never released for production . That would certainly be the true definition of a muscle car! Imagine tooling down the road in a 374 twin 4bbl Isky cammed solid lifter Golden Hawk!
                        Actually the "Jet Streak Kit" did make it to parts-on-the-shelf status ...well at least the Air Cleaners did.

                        I still would like to do additional research to see what if any hand John Z. DeLorean had in stuffing that Packard 352 and his famous Twin-Ultra-matic in a '56J's engine compartment. Also like to research what if any hand John Z. had in the "Jet Streak Kit" with Dual 4-bbl., etc. as it was cancelled right around the same time in 1956 when he jumped from his Studebaker-Packard Engineering job to GM-Pontiac.
                        Last edited by 56Golden; 10-17-2016, 06:17 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 56Golden View Post
                          Actually the "Jet Streak Kit" did make it to parts-on-the-shelf status ...well at least the Air Cleaners did.

                          I still would like to do additional research to see what if any hand John Z. DeLorean had in stuffing that Packard 352 and his famous Twin-Ultra-matic in a '56J's engine compartment. Also like to research what if any hand John Z. had in the "Jet Streak Kit" with Dual 4-bbl., etc. as it was cancelled right around the same time in 1956 when he jumped from his Studebaker-Packard Engineering job to GM-Pontiac.
                          Me too! In all my decades of SDC membership, I don't recall ever reading or hearing of Delorean's name, as having a history, or employment with Studebaker/Packard. It could be that I have come across it before and dismissed it as insignificant, or don't remember. Or, in light of Delorean's late career legal troubles and business failings, have caused folks to shy away from acknowledging his involvement. At that time in his career, how influential could he have been? Apparently, at one time, GM held him in high esteem. My thinking is that he must have had skill, talent, and promise, to be able to even attempt to establish a car company sporting his name for a hood ornament.
                          John Clary
                          Greer, SC

                          SDC member since 1975

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jclary View Post
                            Me too! In all my decades of SDC membership, I don't recall ever reading or hearing of Delorean's name, as having a history, or employment with Studebaker/Packard. It could be that I have come across it before and dismissed it as insignificant, or don't remember. Or, in light of Delorean's late career legal troubles and business failings, have caused folks to shy away from acknowledging his involvement. At that time in his career, how influential could he have been? Apparently, at one time, GM held him in high esteem. My thinking is that he must have had skill, talent, and promise, to be able to even attempt to establish a car company sporting his name for a hood ornament.
                            John, I do not consider what I read on Wikipedia as "fact" ...but I often use it as a 'starting point' for leads when doing my own research.

                            Here you go John ...enjoy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_DeLorean

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Read my response to that story for a different take on the "First Muscle Car" debate.
                              peter lee

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