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Did you know Packard made the Studebaker V8?

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    AMC bought the long idle 232 tooling when Studebaker decided to switch to Chevy motors in 1965. AMC chose to re-arrange the cubic inches a bit differently than Studebaker had. But either way, those 232 cubic inches performed admirably!

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  • Deaf Mute
    replied
    I was informed at a mall car show a few years back that my Avanti was rear-engine, hence no grill. (He was talking to a friend of his and didn't know it was my car he was talking about.) I let him continue on down the row of cars and when he came back up the backside of the row, I opened the trunk just before the two guys got to the car. I don't remember what I pulled from the trunk, but this guy's buddy asked him again about the rear engine. I then took the opportunity to tell them about the Avanti, invited them under the ropes, opened the hood so they could see the chrome and stainless, and let them actually sit in the drivers seat of an Avanti. ... I ain't so bad after all!

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  • Mark57
    replied
    Discussion is Moot

    Actually, all of this discussion is moot as Jim's Landcruiser (a '51) has a Studebaker 232 V8 powerplant which was built and installed quite some time before Packard came on the scene.

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  • StudeMann
    replied
    Actually, I was correct regarding the Studebaker Packard merger. HE said Studebaker bought Packard but I informed him that Packard bought Studebaker.

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  • Packard8
    replied
    Originally posted by rknight89 View Post
    I think I have a '61 Kaiser Lark. It has the Packard 259 V-8 that Ford used in the Falcon and early Mustang but they called it a 260. When Studebaker got bought by GM in the '60s and went to Canada, they sold all old the engines to AMC. Except for the 289. Everyone knows that was used by Ford. Chrysler bought the rest of the leftover parts and built the 360 Dodge engine which had interchangeable parts with the AMC 360 used in the big Jeeps...Hence...The Kaiser Jeep. Who doesn't know that!!! Now it's in print on the computer. It MUST be true!
    You should write a Auto History book

    Leave a comment:


  • Packard8
    replied
    Originally posted by swvalcon View Post
    Packard8. THe guy could be right. Maybe someone put a ford 289 in it. I saw one with a 454 chev so I guess chev must have had something to do with the Avanti also. Seems to me it was a 4 seater corvette they didnt want so they sold the plans to Studebaker. Now we have a whole bunch of new rumors to run with.
    I'm sure he thought that all Avanti's had a "Ford 289". Amazing what you can learn by standing in the shadows at a car show and listening .......

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  • swvalcon
    replied
    Packard8. THe guy could be right. Maybe someone put a ford 289 in it. I saw one with a 454 chev so I guess chev must have had something to do with the Avanti also. Seems to me it was a 4 seater corvette they didnt want so they sold the plans to Studebaker. Now we have a whole bunch of new rumors to run with.

    Leave a comment:


  • rknight89
    replied
    I think I have a '61 Kaiser Lark. It has the Packard 259 V-8 that Ford used in the Falcon and early Mustang but they called it a 260. When Studebaker got bought by GM in the '60s and went to Canada, they sold all old the engines to AMC. Except for the 289. Everyone knows that was used by Ford. Chrysler bought the rest of the leftover parts and built the 360 Dodge engine which had interchangeable parts with the AMC 360 used in the big Jeeps...Hence...The Kaiser Jeep. Who doesn't know that!!! Now it's in print on the computer. It MUST be true!

    Leave a comment:


  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
    The more interesting and/or exciting fiction makes difficult work for the mundane facts.

    My daily newspaper carries a Saturday auto enthusiast column by a writer who disseminates one or more easily fact-checked mistakes each week. Two weeks ago he ran a quote from the original owner of an early Lark 259" V8 hardtop who said something like, "It has the powerful Packard V8 and my wife was always getting speeding tickets." How a guy has owned a car for fifty years and still hadn't gotten that straightened out boggles the mind. How the other guy can get paid for expert writing about cars is even more inexplicable.

    jack vines
    Similar situation here. There must be a special test that these guys have to pass or union they have to join before they can get these jobs. Just think -- in the pre-Google days, they would have had to go to their local library to check their facts.

    Leave a comment:


  • SN-60
    replied
    When My Dad bought His new '55 Studebaker President State Sedan, The dealer (Tony Kibart of Kibart Motor Sales, Brockton, Mass.) assured Him it was powered by a Packard V8, and My Dad, who wasn't a 'car guy', always said that His Studebaker had a Packard V8 under its hood!

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  • Packard8
    replied
    I had my Avanti at a car show and a guy said to his kid "Uncle Fred had one just like that, with a Ford 289 motor"

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  • jnfweber
    replied
    Originally posted by mmagic View Post
    I had remembered that the "merger" was technically an acquisition by the Packard Corporation of Studebaker for reasons like tax loss carry forward advantage etc. Wikipedia says it was that way as well.

    "The Studebaker-Packard Corporation was the entity created by the purchase of the Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana, by the Packard Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan, in 1954. While Studebaker was the larger of the two companies, Packard's balance sheet and executive team were stronger than that of the South Bend company."

    I'm afraid your friend was right.
    James J. Nance was President & Chief Executive of Packard Motor Car Company since 1952 and became president of Studebaker-Packard. He found Studebaker's financial situation to be in such dire straights that he had to engineer the deal with Curtis-Wright which allowed the enterprise to continue. He had tried to engineer a 4-way merger with Nash, Hudson, and Studebaker but that was not to be. I am including an interesting link regarding this Packard Executive. He can credited to saving Studebaker at that time.

    http://auto.howstuffworks.com/1956-p...-executive.htm
    Last edited by jnfweber; 09-02-2013, 09:36 PM.

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    The more interesting and/or exciting fiction makes difficult work for the mundane facts.

    My daily newspaper carries a Saturday auto enthusiast column by a writer who disseminates one or more easily fact-checked mistakes each week. Two weeks ago he ran a quote from the original owner of an early Lark 259" V8 hardtop who said something like, "It has the powerful Packard V8 and my wife was always getting speeding tickets." How a guy has owned a car for fifty years and still hadn't gotten that straightened out boggles the mind. How the other guy can get paid for expert writing about cars is even more inexplicable.

    jack vines

    Leave a comment:


  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Originally posted by mmagic View Post
    I had remembered that the "merger" was technically an acquisition by the Packard Corporation of Studebaker for reasons like tax loss carry forward advantage etc. Wikipedia says it was that way as well.

    "The Studebaker-Packard Corporation was the entity created by the purchase of the Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana, by the Packard Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan, in 1954. While Studebaker was the larger of the two companies, Packard's balance sheet and executive team were stronger than that of the South Bend company."

    I'm afraid your friend was right.

    Leave a comment:


  • sweetolbob
    replied
    Originally posted by JRoberts View Post
    So does this mean that the R7 or 8 Studebaker V-8 found in the limited production in 1965 and 66 was a 352 Packard V-8?
    Now there's a man with a great memory, good call back.

    Leave a comment:

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