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Piston Knurling

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  • #31
    I would put it together. At most you may get a little piston slap on start up when cold and maybe burn a little more oil.

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    • #32
      I just put the phone down, after calling a machine shop in Louisville that has been open since 1958. When I asked about piston knurling, without hesitation he said, "sure I can do that, no problem". So I guess I will be making a trip to Louisville sometime this week, after work.

      Thanks for all the advice and opinions folks! Will post pix of the pistons after they are knurled.

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      • #33
        Am I dreaming that some "knurlizer" machines put knurling on to form their logo or trademark?

        Similar to this -
        http://www.shorpy.com/files/non-skid.jpg

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Dan Timberlake View Post
          Am I dreaming that some "knurlizer" machines put knurling on to form their logo or trademark?

          Similar to this -
          http://www.shorpy.com/files/non-skid.jpg
          I dunno Dan,
          But, looking at this video, I do not see why that could not have been done: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uzZYPIGbZE

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          • #35
            I just dropped the pistons off at "Miles' Machine Shop" in Louisville, which has been open since 1958. Mr. Miles Sr. picks & chooses the jobs he'll do now days, and leaves the rest to his younger machinists; he will be knurling my pistons.

            Turns out, knurling is quite an art, best done by someone with experience, or under tut-ledge. Mr. Miles explained to increase a piston diameter .004", it must first be "knurled up" to .014", then cut back down to .004". The .010" removed is pointed surface material (actually only .005" of surface) that would quickly wear away if installed that way. Once cut back down, it leaves a knurled surface that is about as durable as ever, and with a better oil film.

            I am more impressed by this machine shop each time I go up there. luckily it is only about 25 miles from my house.
            Last edited by JoeHall; 03-10-2015, 02:59 PM.

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            • #36
              in school we did it for my friends car for like $110 complete engine did not want to do it right for $310 in 1972 it stopped the oil out the tail pipe for a while

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              • #37
                Originally posted by avanti1982 View Post
                in school we did it for my friends car for like $110 complete engine did not want to do it right for $310 in 1972 it stopped the oil out the tail pipe for a while
                I built a coffee table in high school wood shop; learned a tiny bit about wood work, quickly forgotten later. I haven't built another, and that one probably went into a dumpster. High school is a time for dabbling, but not perfecting. I would not let an auto shop student touch my car today, but may have back in high school.

                OTOH, I have no problem with work by a professional who has rebuilt motors since 1958. If he says a properly knurled piston will last as long as a regular one, I believe him, especially since personal experience is same.

                As with coffee tables, hopefully, anyone who knurled pistons in high school will not use the outcome as a measuring stick for professional work
                Last edited by JoeHall; 03-15-2015, 07:11 PM.

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                • #38
                  A good Machine Shop that wants to work on Studebaker engines is hard to find! I went to three of them before one would touch my Avanti heads a couple years ago. Remember when we were charged $2.00 a hole to grind valves??? I do.

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                  • #39
                    Not that my approval means anything, But, you did the right thing and can rest easy. I have knurled many sets, with good results.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Deaf Mute View Post
                      A good Machine Shop that wants to work on Studebaker engines is hard to find! I went to three of them before one would touch my Avanti heads a couple years ago. Remember when we were charged $2.00 a hole to grind valves??? I do.
                      In 1967 I knew a guy that charged a buck a valve to grind them. He did it as a sideline. His main job was a self employed junk car hauler, and they all went straight to the shreader. In 1967 he came to the service station to show his son-in-law and me the 1953 MINT Packard he had on the hook. He offered it to me for $50, and I was too stupid to buy it. It was mint, except the automatic tranny needed to be fixed. That's what happens when you're young and dumb and are blinded by Chevy headlights in your eyes. LOL

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                      • #41
                        Dan the perfect circle knurling process left PC's all over the pistons skirt. Doofus

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                        • #42
                          Ahh.... now I don't have to do is go digging thru all my old magazines and books to see if I was imagining things, again.

                          thanks Doofus

                          Dan T

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