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seat frame rust removal?

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  • Interior: seat frame rust removal?

    I found and bought a set of Mors brand seat covers I called the person selling and made a deal I really can't get hurt too bad on. I like em' JDP says the basic frames are the same. My frames are in pretty good shape, no busted springs or really busted anything. The front seats even retain most if there original fabric which is very disgusting. That being said they of course have a thin-ish layer of surface rust all over them. So I'm wondering what is the cheapest/best way to get rid of this? I thought about electrifying them like is so seen up here but I'd need a big tank to do it. Do I even need need to remove this or is there a way around it? Any ideas?

  • #2
    Do you have a sand blaster near you? you could have them do a fast run over them with a blaster and epoxy prime them with black epoxy.

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    • #3
      If you have them stripped down to metal they are prime canidates for molasses. A large garbage can to stand them on end in would do the job. Flip it if its to tall.
      a wood box lined with plastic would work as well.

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      • #4
        Sand blasting and paint.
        Tom - Bradenton, FL

        1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
        1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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        • #5
          If the rust layer is thin, how about just painting the springs with POR-15?
          RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

          17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
          10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
          10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
          4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
          5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
          56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
          60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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          • #6
            Sand off as much rust as possible and "scuff up" the rest - Use Rust Oleum primer and paint. It will out last you.
            paul TK

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            • #7
              I'll check into the cost to snag a can of POR15 but I might just knpck most of it off and paint em'. I got the seat covers in the mail today and they look great! I checked and they fit my moatly intact seat almost perfect, just a little different at the top but that can be worked out when I cut the foam.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GThawkwind View Post
                I found and bought a set of Mors brand seat covers I called the person selling and made a deal I really can't get hurt too bad on. I like em' JDP says the basic frames are the same. My frames are in pretty good shape, no busted springs or really busted anything. The front seats even retain most if there original fabric which is very disgusting. That being said they of course have a thin-ish layer of surface rust all over them. So I'm wondering what is the cheapest/best way to get rid of this? I thought about electrifying them like is so seen up here but I'd need a big tank to do it. Do I even need need to remove this or is there a way around it? Any ideas?
                I did something some years ago to remove rust in a gas tank that may work for you. I had a cement mixer and jammed the gas tank in to the barrel with a shovel of sand in the tank and let it tumble all day in a horizontal position. The sand may tumble enough to clean your seat I don't know, it may be worth a try. Dave

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                • #9
                  Easiest and cheapest way is to soak in a tub of vinegar or molasses for a few days (anywhere from 2-3, depending on how thick the rust is). Just need to find a plastic container that is large enough. I use this technique all the time on steel parts and am always amazed at how well it works. Parts often look as new when you pull them out and rinse them.

                  Rinse the clean frames in a bath of baking soda and water to neutralize the acid and then dry immediately. Otherwise, you will get flash rust. Just prime and paint after that.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by WilburV View Post
                    Easiest and cheapest way is to soak in a tub of vinegar or molasses for a few days (anywhere from 2-3, depending on how thick the rust is). Just need to find a plastic container that is large enough. I use this technique all the time on steel parts and am always amazed at how well it works. Parts often look as new when you pull them out and rinse them.

                    Rinse the clean frames in a bath of baking soda and water to neutralize the acid and then dry immediately. Otherwise, you will get flash rust. Just prime and paint after that.
                    Good formula, I add lemon juice to the vinegar for an extra shot of acid, and yes it has to be prepted right away or you can see the rust reforming good stuff Dave

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                    • #11
                      I sand blasted the frames/springs on my '32 Studebaker and coated them with rattle can undercoating. Seems to keep the springs quieter...

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