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50 Champion, ignition coil wires

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  • 50 Champion, ignition coil wires

    I am replacing the coil and did not notice which wires went where.
    There are three wires, two go on one terminal and the third on the other. The terminals are marked + or - . I need some help please.

    Dick
    Mountain Home, AR
    http://livingintheozarks.com/studebaker.htm

    Dick
    Mountain Home, AR
    http://www.livingintheozarks.com/studebaker2.htm

  • #2
    Got it figured. The - terminal wire goes to the distributor and + is the energized side.

    Dick
    Mountain Home, AR
    http://livingintheozarks.com/studebaker.htm

    Dick
    Mountain Home, AR
    http://www.livingintheozarks.com/studebaker2.htm

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Dick,

      I have the single wire going to the coil from the side of the distributor and the the other two wires come from the wiring harness. At least one of those goes to the ignition. I wasn't aware the coil was wound with a polarity but since it is positive ground and current goes to ground, I'd say negative pole is switch wire. Positive pole grounds to distibutor housing. This would be where I'd do something stupid like put the battery cable on loose and try to crank it over. Have hopped out of the car quick many times just in case I'm wrong. HA!

      Where is Mr. Biggs for the ultimate technical answer?

      Cabrina Dieters
      Murfreesboro TN
      1950 Starlight Coupe

      Comment


      • #4
        Too fast for me. Plus I'd be backwards. Glad you got the baby going!!

        Comment


        • #5
          http://www.studebakerparts.com/stude...es/50-wire.jpg

          The above is a wiring diagram for 9g, 1950 Studebakers. The + side of the coil goes to
          the ignition switch (battery voltage). The negative side has two wires. One goes to distributor
          and the other goes to a kickdown switch. I'm pretty sure of the wiring but couldn't see the
          coil polarity in my car.
          The 1950 Champion Starlight
          Santa Barbara
          CA

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          • #6
            I've been having trouble with ignition after the car is warmed up good, about 15-20 miles. It was suggested it might be the coil, so a new coil seemed to be in order. I'll drive it to work tomorrow, about a 40 mile round trip. We'll see.


            Dick
            Mountain Home, AR
            http://livingintheozarks.com/studebaker.htm

            Dick
            Mountain Home, AR
            http://www.livingintheozarks.com/studebaker2.htm

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Dick,

              I always had trouble with the coils in my car, too. Particularly during hot July and August weather. Fellow at work told me the easiest way to check the coil was at night by grounding the main wire to the block and looking for a good spark. After the first time I learned to wrap my arm in a nice heavy towel just in case it was working fine. HA! Much cheaper version of electo-shock than anything a shrink could recommend. The ultimate Studebaker aversion therapy.

              Cabrina

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              • #8
                If the car is a '50, and it has the original six volt system, then it has positive ground. That means the (+) terminal should go to the points, as it's the points which provide a ground to the coil primary when they close. The (-) terminal should go to the ignition switch. If there is a third wire present, it should go to the overdrive kick-down switch, and that should be attached to the same terminal as the wire from the distributor. If the car has a radio, there may be a suppression condenser attached to the coil bracket, and it will connect to the (-) terminal.

                The car WILL run if the (+) and (-) terminals on the coil are reversed, but if it's connected backwards, you may have a miss at high speeds or with a hot engine. The spark at the plugs DOES have some polarity to it, and it tends to jump the gap easier if the polarity is correct. The coils are marked so that if the primary terminals connect to the corresponding terminals on the battery, then the secondary polarity will be correct.

                If you don't know which of the three wires is which, simply turn on the ignition, and use a test light to see which one has juice in it. That one goes to the (-) terminal, and the remaining two go to the (+).

                Hope this helps.

                Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for the postive ground system explanation, Gord. Glad my set-up is OK. (+) to distributor. (-) to ignition and my other mysterious (-) must be to the radio. I have my (+) kickdown switch wire running from the distributor and not the coil. Would it be better to move that terminal to the coil?

                  Thanks,
                  Cabrina

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Cabrina, generally speaking, if A and B are connected by a wire, anything that is supposed to be connected to "A" can be equally well connected at "B".

                    You can't stretch this generalization TOO far, like by connecting the starter solenoid to the "B" terminal on the voltage regulator because it is connected to the battery. The wire/terminal in question has to able to handle the load. Generally, the exact points chosen to make connections in a car harness are based on convenience (to manufacture) and to minimize the amount of wire used (to save money).

                    I'm not sure what your third mystery wire is. The radio suppressor, if present, looks just like an ignition condenser, and is usually screwed to the coil bracket. It connects to the same terminal of the coil as does the ignition switch, NOT the distributor side. You may find a similar suppressor on the generator, connected to the "ARM" terminal (the larger stud).

                    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I changed out the coil yesterday and drove the Starlight to work and back today. It never missed a beat, 20 miles home in 97 deg. heat at 30-60 m.p.h. Hopefully, problem solved. Next project, rear axle seals. (Rt. rear leaks a litte)

                      Dick
                      Mountain Home, AR
                      http://livingintheozarks.com/studebaker.htm


                      Dick
                      Mountain Home, AR
                      http://www.livingintheozarks.com/studebaker2.htm

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'll bet you turned some heads back and forth from work, Dick. That is a beautiful baby!! And thanks again Gord. I think I'll leave the overdrive kick down switch wired to the distributor stud.

                        Cabrina

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