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Replacement for 16-inch Split-Rim Wheels on a 1949 2R10

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  • Replacement for 16-inch Split-Rim Wheels on a 1949 2R10

    Greetings! i have read in this forum in the past, but i have not contributed to it. i am grateful for the accumulated knowledge present here.

    Our 1949 2R10 3/4-ton pickup is becoming a 1950 2R11 with the installation of a 245 engine and overdrive transmission. We are hoping that soon we can travel on highways -- even Interstates -- without being run over by SUV drivers deep in telephone conversation.

    The 2R10 came with six-lug, 16-inch, split-rim wheels, and we have a none-too-small fortune in bias-ply rubber mounted on them -- 7.00 x 16 rear, 6.50 x 16 front. We should like to find some conventional wheels in the correct six-lug bolt pattern that would allow us to mount modern, tubeless radial tires for everyday travel and reduced maintenance. We should keep the split rims to "show" the truck, but mount the radials to work it.

    Does anyone know what wheels would replace our split rims for this purpose, and where to look for them?

    God's Peace to you.

    d

  • #2
    Welcome to SDC.

    The desire for a 16"-6-lug wheel interchange has been discussed extensively here and over on the Studebaker Truck Talk forum. Bottom line; there isn't one. The Budd wheel used on our trucks is unique. It is possible to have one of the custom wheel makers do up some tubeless wheels for you, at considerable expense.

    Personally, I have never seen anything wrong with the OEM split rims. I've run Michelin 215/85-16" radial tires with tubes in them on the split rims for thirty years with zero problems. They look great, wear like iron, ride and handle well at 85+MPH. I wouldn't even consider changing, as I consider the Budd wheel part of the 3/4t style. Without them, it's just another truck. As always, your truck, your money, your decision.

    jack vines
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      You probably should also post this question over on the Stude truck forum:

      http://www.network54.com/Forum/23885/

      There's a frequent poster there who knows a LOT about truck wheels. Don't forget -- Stude didn't make the wheels themselves. They bought them (and some other HD truck components) from outside suppliers like Budd. Many other truck manufacturers used these same components. All that said, I believe Jack Vines already gave you your answer. Unless you want to pay someone like Stockton Wheel to cut out your wheel centers and graft them onto modern rims, you're pretty well stuck with what you have.
      Skip Lackie

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      • #4
        pay someone like Stockton Wheel to cut out your wheel centers and graft them onto modern rims,
        Yes, this works, as I mentioned earlier.

        No, the end result doesn't look right to my eye. The modern 16" drop center rims are so much deeper, the scallops which give the Budd wheel center its' characteristic look have to be cut away.

        Maybe, if one were willing to go to 19.5" rims and tires, the Budd centers could be retained. However, having used the Budd split rims with modern radial tires and tubes for thirty years with no problems, I just don't understand why anyone would find it necessary to spend large money to get rid of them.

        jack vines
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          Thank you, sir. We ask the questions because we need to know the answers, whether or not we want to know. i have seen your inquiries in other forums on this topic, so i know that you have sought the correct answer as well.

          i'll continue to run those good, new bias-plies on our truck, and hope to find a set of wheels that we can use without the difficulties that split-rims present for the unwary. Not many tire shops, these days, will work with the Budd wheels. Those wheels give the truck a distinctive appearance and declare that it's ready for heavy duty. We need the tall tires on the rear, but i wish they were wider than they are. (Long ago, 7.00 x 16 tires seemed "wide," but today they appear skinny, and they are.)

          God's Peace to you.

          d

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          • #6
            Not many tire shops, these days, will work with the Budd wheels.
            Even today, truck tire shops in Indiana will have no problem with split rims. There are still many farm trucks running them. The current Michelin 215/85-15 radials with tubes are perfect for the Budd wheels. They look much more ready-to-haul-heavy, they ride and track better and none of us will live long enough to wear out a set on a Studebaker truck.
            PackardV8

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            • #7
              Even small out of the way places like Prince Edward Island handle them--but you have to go to a big truck/farm truck/other heavy equipment place which still has the proper equipment to handle them SAFELY, not a car place nowadays. By the way, they also happen to be EXCELLENT places to go to if you want stuff like KING PINS redone on a Studebaker--they understand that technology and stuff like zerks just fine!
              Last edited by Jim B PEI; 10-20-2010, 07:15 PM.

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              • #8
                Up to now i've had no personal experience with split rims, except for the 1949 Studebaker two-ton truck that my father owned close on 60 years ago (7.00 x 20 front, 8.25 x 20 rear). At some point i may look for some tube-type radials, as Mr Vines has suggested. i may also see about some custom wheels. We'll see how the truck runs with the "Big Six" in overdrive on those bias-plies.

                Thanks to all for your interest in this problem.

                God's Peace to you.

                d

                Comment


                • #9
                  Not nit picking, but that rim is not a 'split rim'.
                  There are two 'flats' on the wheel lip, and two 'flats' on the lock ring (no split).
                  Line them up after letting all the air out, and the ring comes off.
                  Clean, and de-rust, and prep, and paint the wheels and rings and put them back together.
                  Take them to a truck tire shop that has a 'cage' and reinflate.
                  Very servicable.
                  Yes, a modern wheel is an improvement, but don't be so quick to condemn the stuff from that era.
                  With proper training (emphasis on 'proper training') this is a good system, and can provide excellent service.
                  HTIH
                  Jeff


                  Originally posted by eirenetheou View Post
                  Up to now i've had no personal experience with split rims, except for the 1949 Studebaker two-ton truck that my father owned close on 60 years ago (7.00 x 20 front, 8.25 x 20 rear). At some point i may look for some tube-type radials, as Mr Vines has suggested. i may also see about some custom wheels. We'll see how the truck runs with the "Big Six" in overdrive on those bias-plies.

                  Thanks to all for your interest in this problem.

                  God's Peace to you.

                  d
                  HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                  Jeff


                  Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                  Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                  • #10
                    Best thing I ever did is have mine powder coated white.

                    jack vines
                    PackardV8

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