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Clock Success - Finally!!!

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  • Clock Success - Finally!!!

    Sometimes I think that you must hold your mouth right when working on Studebakers!!! Even though I cleaned the movement on the clock with 91% alcohol, oiled the bearings, the clock still didn't work. Today I got a brush from the art supply with a fairly long bristle. I used the 91% alcohol again. I was able to get to the bearing surfaces better with this brush. Suddenly, the clock started working and continues to work! I have connected it to a battery and will run it overnite to see if it will continue to work. If it does, will see if I can get it lubed somehow before putting it together again.

    I bought some reel oil, but it seems a bit thick. I thought about some sewing machine oil, but when I went to the sewing machine shop, the owner told me he didn't carry oil, but that he used either reel oil or gun oil. I asked about 3 in 1 oil and he told me that oils like that contain parrafin and leaves a residue, which is what clogs up the works, if there is no heat to keep the parafin melted. So he suggested gun oil or reel oil. So I continue to try to find some oil locally to lube the movement without buying a pint of watch oil that will last my family for the next 2000 years!![)]





    Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker
    Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

  • #2
    Congrats! It's a great feeling isn't it? So I assume you're no longer interested in the clock we talked about?

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    • #3
      Let it run a few days before putting it back together. You may need to pick it up and shake it every once in awhile.

      I had a FRIENDLY clock/watch shop GIVE me an ounce or so of oil... I have it in a small medicine bottle.

      I use a small artist brush to lube the parts also.

      No hurry on the webpage html then huh?

      Ray


      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
      Ray

      www.raylinrestoration.com
      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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      • #4
        I suspect most watch or clock repair shops will sell you some clock oil. Usually comes in a small 1 or 2 oz. bottle. Use a needle to apply the oil to the bearing points. Also a good idea to attach a diode across the points to reduce arcing and point burning and increase the life substantially. That has been covered previously in Turning Wheels and maybe other posts.

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        • #5
          ditto on the constant battery feed...better have the fuse in place...

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          • #6
            You might try a hobby shop for oil, also. They have very fine oil with needle applicators that are used for small trains, slot cars, etc. Not sure if the oil is right for the application, but many small trains and slot cars have very tiny gears that cant afford to be gummed up.

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            • #7
              Well, as luck would have it, I was in the process of putting the clock back in the dash and ... it stopped!!! Don' know if its the clock or the wiring. It won't rewind. haven't had a chance to test it yet. So, Keith I may still be interested in the clock you have... and Ray, I still need the web page HTML. Thanks for everyone's help.

              Half the fun of having an old car is to be able to 'tinker' on it!!?? I guess!!



              Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker
              Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

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              • #8
                OK Mike, I'll hold on to my 62 clock in case you need it. While I'm here, here's a link to Ray's clock repair page......

                http://www.raylinrestoration.com/Tec...lockRepair.htm

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