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  • Fuel System: Electric fuel pump conversion question

    Hi all, this is my first post on the forum. Looking for some suggestion. I’m 23 years old and recently acquired a 1950 champion that I’ve been doing some work to and trying to understand the older systems. I’m currently working on upgrading the fuel system. I’ve got a brand new carb, just ordered new fuel tank and lines and am now looking to convert from mechanical pump to electric pump to avoid vapor lock issues. I purchased this electric fuel pump: https://www.summitracing.com/parts/atx-e8011. I’m currently looking into the whole regulator debate. I’m hoping somebody can give me advice as to what type of regulator to get or what’s worked best for them. Specifically, return vs. non-return regulators. I’m also under the impression that I should be keeping the pressure into the carb at around 4-5 psi, but a lot of the regulators I find range from 4.5+. Hoping for some suggestions or advice.

    Thanks,
    Brandon

  • #2
    Hi Brandon,
    I would limit the pressure to about 3.5 lbs as those early carbs' needle and seat are not intended for today's higher pressures. I have a '48 with electric pump and this limit.
    Bill

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Buzzard View Post
      Hi Brandon,
      I would limit the pressure to about 3.5 lbs as those early carbs' needle and seat are not intended for today's higher pressures. I have a '48 with electric pump and this limit.
      Bill
      Hi Bill,
      thanks for the response. Do you run with the mechanical pump and electric pump? If only electric pump, how do you regulate to 3.5 lbs? I can’t find a regulator that’s rated for that low.

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      • #4
        I'm using a Facet pump, 40178, which runs between 2 and 3.5 psi @ 15 gph, with no issues. My car has a Stromberg WW 2 barrel carb, so depending on the carb you're using " your results may vary". I also removed the mechanical pump when I installed the electric pump.

        You may also want to consider installing some type of inertia kill switch or an oil presssure safety switch

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        • #5
          Nice car BTW

          Comment


          • #6
            Most of what one finds in Jegs/Summit/Speedway is way overkill in both capacity and cost. The good news is your Champion needs about the smallest, least expensive electric fuel pump available and shouldn't need a regulator.

            jack vines
            PackardV8

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            • #7
              On my 41 Ford I used a Mr. Gasket fuel pump with their regulator.
              https://www.cjponyparts.com/mr-gaske...All%20Products
              It worked, but its not the best quality and the adjustments felt clumsy.
              I am going to go with the electric pump with regulator on my 60 Lark. I am leaning toward the Facet pump and I bought this Holley regulator:
              https://www.summitracing.com/parts/hly-12-804

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              • #8
                What jack said, if you do not run an Oversized Pump you have no need for a Regulator.

                A Big Pump WITH a Regulator System is done on High Performance, higher fuel usage, Muscle Cars so they have enough Volume and Pressure to run a return line to the Tank or in excessively Hot climates etc. On a 85 HP Six, no worries!
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                • #9
                  On my single barrel Lark I’m running a “Mr. Gasket” three psi unit and on this 289 Champ I’m running the cad-plated round unit from studebaker international. Neither have regulators, nor return lines. both are top notch.
                  Starting today after a month-long sleep, the electric fuel pump filled the carburetor on the Champ, once it changed its “tone” I knew the float bowl was full, started cranking and it fired right up.

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                  • #10
                    All Studes, including 6 cylinders, can benefit from a return line. It won't help hot restarts, but will help it smooth out much more quickly, once restarted hot. To run a return line, you need a 'T', located as near the carb as possible. You need a FP with extra volume, if you want to install a return line, or the motor starve, especially at higher RPM and/or under load. I like an in-line restrictor, and find about .030" hole in the restrictor is all that's needed for the return line to pump fuel back into the filler tube strong enough to hit the opposite wall of the tube. I locate the return line 3-4 inches down the filler neck, so I can easily check the stream.

                    I much prefer the Facet brand CUBE type pump over all others. It's available in various capacities, and I use the one with highest capacity in order to run a return line (forget the part number, but you can search the archives here). I still have this setup on the 56J, but converted both GTs to EFI 8-9 years ago.

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