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Towing an Avanti II ???

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  • Drive Shaft: Towing an Avanti II ???

    I'm going to check out a '72 Avanti II that's about 350 miles from my house. The plan is, if I buy it, to rent a tow dolly and tow it home. The Chevy engine is partially disassembled but all included. I would replace the two rear tires before the trip, as well as change the rear axle lube and remove the drive shaft. I will also plug the rear of the 400TH transmission. I have towed several vehicles with a tow dolly before but never a long trip such as this. Is there anything else I should do, that I'm missing? Oh yeah, make sure the ignition switch/column is unlocked so the front wheels can turn/steer? The car has no sunroof so I don't have to worry about it blowing open or off on the highway. I'm thinking windows down about an inch for some ventilation as the car has been garaged for a few years. Any tips or suggestions will be appreciated. Thanks.
    Last edited by thom; 09-20-2019, 09:19 PM.
    thom

  • #2
    I am not a big time user of Tow Dollies, I own a U-Haul Auto Transport Trailer.
    But I have used the Dollies a couple of times.
    What I remember is, the front wheels need to be locked straight ahead and are strapped to the Wheel "Pockets/Buckets" so they do NOT Turn because they are part of a turn-able Axle.
    I am sure the Rental Place will tell you the best way to use it AND the Instruction Decals that are always on U-Haul Equipment will also .

    What you plan to do with the Car sounds good, just do check for leaks and loosen the Rear Brake Adjustments, it has happened that stuck wheel cylinders/dragging shoes have created enough Heat to get the Shoes on fire from leaking Axle Seals, I have even removed the Shoes in worst cases.
    Last edited by StudeRich; 09-20-2019, 05:00 PM.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #3
      Just rent the car hauler. It's really not that much more, and the safety factor is huge.

      I wouldn't trust a dolly going that far. My $.02

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      • #4
        I was thinking more about the extra weight of the trailer than the cost of the trailer compared to the tow dolly. But, the trailers are aluminum aren't they? So probably not very heavy. The '03 Chevy 2wd ,1/2 ton truck does not have a towing package, but it does have a U-Haul hitch.
        Last edited by thom; 09-20-2019, 06:05 PM.
        thom

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        • #5
          U-Haul will probably tell you that you cannot tow a trailer with a 1/2 Ton Truck, they usually require a 3/4 or 1 Ton Truck, IF they go by the Corp. rules more than their Pocketbook.
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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          • #6
            So I might have to go with the tow dolly, <IF> I buy the car. IF I don't, problem solved. I've tried to learn as much as I can about "hog troughs" and other Avanti things to look for so I can make a wise decision when the time comes. The price seems right, but we shall see.
            thom

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            • #7
              Originally posted by thom View Post
              I was thinking more about the extra weight of the trailer than the cost of the trailer compared to the tow dolly. But, the trailers are aluminum aren't they? So probably not very heavy. The '03 Chevy 2wd ,1/2 ton truck does not have a towing package, but it does have a U-Haul hitch.
              They are actually quite heavy, but they pull and haul great. Uhaul would not let me haul an Avanti with my 2000 Silverado 4X4 but, I believe I could rent one now to haul with my previous 14 and now 19 1500 Ram 4X4.

              You should be OK with a dolly if you do as suggested, tow slow and check the tires frequently on the Avanti. BIAC, I'd still much prefer the trailer. I pulled my 83 Avanti back from Vermont (750 miles) on one of their trailers with my son's 2500HD GMC and it was an easy trip with no worries. You need to stop occasionally to let the folks admire yours though.

              Be sure you have good tires on the rear.
              , ,

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              • #8
                I have had a couple bad experiences with tow dollies. If possible I'd want to use a trailer. The U haul trailers as noted above are excellent, though steel and pretty heavy. The weight is inconsequential though to fuel economy.
                Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                • #9
                  Well...we are all adults here, and once you take possession it's yours. Life itself is a series of risks and I have already had my share. But, my thought is to haul not tow. The longer that vehicle has sat unused, the more suspect the dormant components are in terms of condition (lubrication?), degradation, etc. I confess that My opinion is very easy from the perspective of my recliner couch, computer monitor, and the fact that my wallet is not involved. Whatever you decide, I wish only for the best success in getting it home and a rewarding project completion!
                  John Clary
                  Greer, SC

                  SDC member since 1975

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                  • #10
                    I have rented a trailer from U-Haul and from different locations prior to buying my own trailer. Never a problem with a half ton truck and putting an Avanti on the trailer. I would certainly go that way before a dolly.
                    Mike
                    Fort Worth, TX


                    1964 Avanti R2 #R-4986

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                    • #11
                      I have towed vehicles both ways. If I could choose, the trailer hands down! Sometimes you don't have a choice or if the distance is short, you can get away with a dolly.

                      One problem with the dolly not touched yet, brakes. A good trailer will have brakes but the dolly doesn't. Adding 3,200 lbs to you vehicle is not conducive to safe stopping.

                      As noted by another, there are too many possible problems that can occur in route. A trailer is just that much more secure.

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                      • #12
                        Use a 3/4T truck or better. I towed my Hawk with my 3/4T Chevy and it was pretty much at the limit. Brakes were "challenged" with the 2T trailer and complete Hawk. The Uhaul site will only let you rent a trailer after to list the towing vehicle and the vehicle being towed. Tow dollies are only good up to 45mph and the driveshaft should be disconnected.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by spokejr View Post
                          I have towed vehicles both ways. If I could choose, the trailer hands down! Sometimes you don't have a choice or if the distance is short, you can get away with a dolly.

                          One problem with the dolly not touched yet, brakes. A good trailer will have brakes but the dolly doesn't. Adding 3,200 lbs to you vehicle is not conducive to safe stopping.

                          As noted by another, there are too many possible problems that can occur in route. A trailer is just that much more secure.
                          A lot of dollies have brakes, most of them the surge type so you don't have to have a brake controller.
                          I've towed my Kar Kaddy dolly nearly 20,000 miles and the only problem has been a flat tire.
                          Buy a $40 tire monitor from Amazon and install the senders on the dolly tires and the rear tires of the towed vehicle.
                          BTW, our 66 Daytona was on the dolly for most of those miles. The rear U-joint was disconnected and the driveshaft clamped to the muffler with several long radiator hose screw clamps. Just tape the caps onto the joint and wrap and tape to secure. Did not have to remove driveshaft and plug the trans. You can make it as difficult or as easy as you want.
                          sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
                          1950 Champion Convertible
                          1950 Champion 4Dr
                          1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
                          1957 Thunderbird

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