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Cutting Swage / Swedge To Remove Drum From Hub

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  • Brakes: Cutting Swage / Swedge To Remove Drum From Hub

    All Stude factory drum & hub assemblies came with the studs swedged, to permanently mount the drum onto the hub. To swedge, is to slightly mushroom the base of the stud, just above the surface of the drum. Problem is, if a replacement drum is ever needed, the swedged on drum was designed to be permanent. I suppose back in the day, drum and hub assemblies were readily available. But today, only drums are available, and hubs must be swapped over from the old drums.

    I plan to install new rear drums on a GT, so looked in the archives here, but found only a couple of older threads on swedge cutting. One poster provided a link to Goodson Tool Company and swedge cutters sold there, but those tools (1/2" and 9/16") were too small for the 1/2" studs on our Studs, so I dunno how he used them. There was some difference of opinion on what it takes to do the job; most insisted it required a machinist, with drill press or mill, but one guy insisted he used a 5'8" hole saw from a hardware store, and cut the swedges himself. Since no tool is actually available for our Studes, I decided to take a chance and follow the guy's advice on a hardware store 5/8" hole saw. A hole saw that small was not available at any local store, so I ordered one on Amazon, and chose a Lenox brand. It came in today and, after about 15 minutes per drum, I had removed both hubs. The swedge material (actually just mushroomed stud base) is soft, and the hole saw cut it like butter. I stopped the cut when it was even with the surface of the drum, then tapped the hub with a brass drift, and it simply fell out. As for how many swedges the Lenox would cut before it dulled, I'd estimate at least two more.

    So, for anyone who wants to replace their front or rear drums, which were swedged on at the factory, just use a Lenox brand, 5/8" hole saw (remove the pilot drill). Do not try anything other than a 5/8", as it has a perfect ID and OD to do the job as nicely as is probably possible in a machine shop. The snug ID keeps the saw centered, and the 5/8" OD is same size as the holes in the drum. Also, use a drill with variable speed trigger, and keep RPM to around 350, and keep the cutting surface well oiled.
    Last edited by JoeHall; 08-12-2019, 06:06 AM. Reason: To correct spelling

  • #2
    Well Joe good job, but NOW where are you going to get a Swedging Tool to re-swedge the New Studs?
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #3
      Brand X drums from the factory had a thin flat "Speed Nut" pressed onto 1 stud to keep drum in place as assy rolled down the line. nissan and probably other imports used 1 counter sunk screw to do the same. Luck Doofus

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      • #4
        I cut the swedges with the same cutter Joe used, to replace the studs on my left rear drum with right hand studs. However, I cut the remains of the swedge after I popped the drum off, and found no need to reswedge the new studs.

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        • #5
          I have installed two AMC rear ends in Studes, and they did not use swedging. Also, the Fairborn flanged axles do not use swedging. Also, SI sells drums only, so I am betting lots of folks have installed them onto old hubs, without swedging them on. Further, thanks to Mike Super's tip posted here a few years ago, I also have brand x drums on the rear of the other GT, and they are not swedged, and doing just fine. So I am not gonna worry about swedging this pair of drums either.

          Here is a link to Mike Super's post back in 2013:https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....085#post724085
          Last edited by JoeHall; 08-10-2019, 11:01 AM.

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          • #6
            I have a curious question, is there any risk of the studs turning while trying to remove a wheel if they are not swedged?

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            • #7
              The studs either have splines, or else an interference fit in the flange. They wont turn, unless you drove them out, and then tried to drive them back in.

              And when did "swage" become swedge?
              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gordr View Post
                The studs either have splines, or else an interference fit in the flange. They wont turn, unless you drove them out, and then tried to drive them back in.

                And when did "swage" become swedge?
                I probably flunked spelling in school so it's a little late now. According to Webster swedge is, "variant spelling of swage". So take your pick. Webster's definition doesn't quite fit either, since Studebaker used a hydraulic press to perform the swedge/swage. But then, Webster's definition is in referral to when the word was first coined, in 1812.

                Hopefully, everyone here knows what we are talking about.

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                • #9
                  Wife's 57 Silver Hawk has new drums all round. each stud is staked in 4 places for drum retention. Luck Doofus

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                  • #10
                    +1 on the 5/8" hole saw. When we did it to my Lark drum, the pro-swager who'd done it before, brought out an older axle and used it as
                    a makeshift hammering surface, and we used a small hand sledge to flatten the edges of the holes, post drilling. Worked like a Champ.

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                    • #11
                      Perhaps not the approved method but, on two occasions I have swapped hubs to new drums and extracted the studs with the drum laying on a concrete floor and a single forceful blow with a 3 lb sledge without removing the swage. But I was reassembling with new studs with fresh splines and drew them together with an impact wrench; have had no issue and no broken drums.
                      Other's luck may vary.
                      "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                      Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                      '33 Rockne 10,
                      '51 Commander Starlight,
                      '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                      '56 Sky Hawk

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                      • #12
                        I simply see no reason to re-swage the studs. Once the wheel is on, and lug nuts torqued down, where is the drum gonna go? I am more concerned that the base of the studs's size match the holes in the drum, and protrude all the way through the drum. If there is any mismatch, the drum holes quickly become oblong-ed.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
                          I simply see no reason to re-swage the studs. Once the wheel is on, and lug nuts torqued down, where is the drum gonna go?
                          X2. I recall some OPEL in the 60's had nothing to hold the drums onto the hubs, except the wheels.
                          Thanks for reporting about this.
                          sigpic

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by gordr View Post
                            The studs either have splines, or else an interference fit in the flange. They wont turn, unless you drove them out, and then tried to drive them back in.

                            And when did "swage" become swedge?
                            After searching the archives here, I pulled up threads with both spellings, with most under the correct spelling (swage). So, for the sake of making our archives as useful as possible, I included both spellings in the title here.
                            Thanks.
                            Last edited by JoeHall; 08-12-2019, 06:06 AM.

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