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  • South Bend Demolition Map

    Depressing, isn't it?

    Last edited by StudHawk60; 05-11-2011, 12:56 PM.

  • #2
    Tragic. A real shame. All we have now is pictures.

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    • #3
      "All we have now is pictures."

      Disagree: we have all our lovely cars that came from this plant, plus a world class museum and record center.
      sigpic

      Mike Barany

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      • #4
        This is not a post about Studebaker automobiles. I was referring to the buildings. Can you walk into one of the original buildings and see where your Studebaker was built by getting in your Studebaker? "All we have now is pictures".

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        • #5
          When buildings become run down and are crumbling, they need to be torn down, no matter how we feel about them. They are no longer useful to anyone. Of course, the one Studebaker building that still exists is the administration building. At least we have that.
          I also agree with White Hawk that, at least we have our beautiful cars, which came from those buildings. Plus a world class museum for us to visit. I can't wait until 2012 for the Int'l Meet. I fully intend to revisit that great museum.
          '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
          Smithtown,NY
          Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by StudHawk60 View Post
            Depressing, isn't it?

            From what I have seen building #62 (if thats correct) more than likely will survive, but buildings #84 & #113 ( if thats correct) may become victoms to the wrecting ball from there exterior condition apperance. This is only from my perspective. But it is a shame that all those buildings were so neglected.
            Tom
            sigpic

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            • #7
              I used to be a Realtor in Chicago in the years prior to the bubble bursting. (1993-2007) I saw a lot of old industrial buildings converted to loft condominiums. I always thought it was a shame that some of these Studebaker buildings were not converted but I suppose there never was a market for lofts in South Bend.

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              • #8
                The Street map is correct to todays street lay out: however, in the days of auto production Prairie Avenue (SR23) was a straight diagonal roadway going past the foundry (building-85) , building 72 (Note the corner being cut off to accomidate the then Prairie Ave), past the Drive-a-way Yard , under the rail line right of way bridge and on to the intersection of South Street and Chapin Street. The N.Y.C and G.T.W. rail line was elevated in 1927-28.

                From the coal yard going southwesterly a portion of Prairie Avenue was utilized for factory worker parking. The parking was parellel to Prairie Ave.
                sigpic

                Mike Barany

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tahiti Coral View Post
                  I used to be a Realtor in Chicago in the years prior to the bubble bursting. (1993-2007) I saw a lot of old industrial buildings converted to loft condominiums. I always thought it was a shame that some of these Studebaker buildings were not converted but I suppose there never was a market for lofts in South Bend.
                  Actually there have been some old industrial buildings converted to luxury Condos in South Bend, but they have one thing in common ...a great view of the St. Joesph River. Unfortunately, the Studebaker buildings only have a great view of ...other Studebaker buildings.

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                  • #10
                    "Unfortunately, the Studebaker buildings only have a great view of ...other Studebaker buildings."

                    Excellent observation!

                    Too bad there was not a significant Studebaker plant landmark (such as the Oliver Plow Works smoke stack) to retain.
                    Last edited by White Hawk; 05-12-2011, 08:08 AM.
                    sigpic

                    Mike Barany

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by White Hawk View Post
                      The Street map is correct to todays street lay out: however, in the days of auto production Prairie Avenue (SR23) was a straight diagonal roadway going past the foundry (building-85) , building 72 (Note the corner being cut off to accomidate the then Prairie Ave), past the Drive-a-way Yard , under the rail line right of way bridge and on to the intersection of South Street and Chapin Street. The N.Y.C and G.T.W. rail line was elevated in 1927-28.

                      From the coal yard going southwesterly a portion of Prairie Avenue was utilized for factory worker parking. The parking was parellel to Prairie Ave.


                      Yeah, I modified the streets on the map to their current config.

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                      • #12
                        "Unfortunately, the Studebaker buildings only have a great view of ...other Studebaker buildings." Should be had, not have.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by White Hawk View Post
                          "All we have now is pictures."

                          Disagree: we have all our lovely cars that came from this plant, plus a world class museum and record center.
                          True, we have an excellent museum and it's great that we have the archives, the cars, AND one top of that, Studebaker International in the Chippewa Aviation plant. However, (aside from the Chippewa plant) you can't see where your cars were built anymore. Sure, the buildings had their negatives but there was something special about them. The HISTORY in them was incredible, and THAT is what I wish could have been saved from demolition more than anything!
                          Chris Dresbach

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