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The Studebaker Pledge

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  • The Studebaker Pledge

    Item sent to dealers about 1952

    Click image for larger version

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ID:	1885030Click image for larger version

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ID:	1885031 Click to expand
    So.....if I'm 'pre-approved' why do you want me to fill out an application?

  • #2
    And in maintaining those quality standards, many of us can proudly say, "I rebuilt this car !"
    "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

    Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
    Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
    '33 Rockne 10,
    '51 Commander Starlight,
    '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
    '56 Sky Hawk

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    • #3
      Quite amazing with all that emphasis given to quality and durability, they still released the Skybolt OHV 6.
      With their vaunted extensive Laboratory and Proving Ground testing, how could they not have known of its inherent susceptibility to self destruction ?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jessie J. View Post
        Quite amazing with all that emphasis given to quality and durability, they still released the Skybolt OHV 6.
        With their vaunted extensive Laboratory and Proving Ground testing, how could they not have known of its inherent susceptibility to self destruction ?
        True, but you don't have to go that far up from 1952 to find an example that contradicts their statements. The '53 models were notorious for their sloppy assembly quality when they were new.

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        • #5
          As if I really could, I tried to resist commenting ...but here goes...my thoughts are that the Studebaker Corporation suffered from a lack of generational successive VISIONARIES. Key persons with genius business acumen to take risks, make decisions, and strategical moves that maintain its core strength come hell or high water. No succession of Henry Fords, Howard Hughes, Westinghouse, Rockefellers, Ted Turners, Lee Iococcas, (and the list goes on).

          It wasn't the assembly workers, dealers, and day-to-day employees. In my opinion, it was the upper echelon of management, who lacked the vision, passion, and lost the importance of legacy and heritage. In my opinion, the results of this lack of diligence made the corporation susceptible to what I consider "mercenary investors," who dipped in and played the company, but ran at any sign of difficulty. I also think they made half-hearted attempts at diversity by dabbling in marginally profitable holdings that weakened the automotive core. Add to that, in their weakened state, it made them the perfect prey for organized labor(striking Studebaker first) to use them to strike fear in their larger competitors by showing the so-called "Big Three," what could happen to them if they didn't knuckle under to their wage demands.

          In my hillbilly opinion...it was at the very top of the Corporate Leadership chart that lost sight of the Studebaker Pledge.

          Thankfully, thanks to the SDC and its generations of members...the legacy soldiers on!
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

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