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  • Studebaker Parts Depots

    I had posted information on a related site with re to Studebakers various parts depots. Locations and addresses changed over the years but when the axe fell in December 1963 these (below) were in operation. It is my understanding that some of the parts were returned to Plant 8 in South Bend but most were scrapped. I have heard only one story about anyone getting any of the thousands of parts from one of these locations and that was the Pittsburg depot (Allison Park). I am including only a few images of the actual depots but do have others.
    Attached Files
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  • #2
    Thanks, Richard. It is interesting, to me, that there were two locations (different purposes) in the New York City area. Didn't A&M Garage get some of this stock?
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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    • #3
      Thanks for sharing! Really enjoyed the articles and the pictures.

      Mark

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      • #4
        A question I have long wondered....did Studebaker provide service and support for its horse drawn wagons and equipment after production ceased?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
          /Cut/ It is my understanding that some of the parts were returned to Plant 8 in South Bend but most were scrapped. I have heard only one story about anyone getting any of the thousands of parts from one of these locations and that was the Pittsburg depot (Allison Park)./Cut/
          Well most of us know very well where the San Fransisco Parts Depot in Burlingame, CA went, Frost and French Studebaker in Los Angeles bought it all including the Clark Forklift.
          F&F sold it to the Thoms Bros. along with F&F's 8E7-122 Overdrive Red Champ Pickup. So currently the Parts reside at Studebakers West in Redwood City, CA right back to Northern Calif. AGAIN!

          The Los Angles Depot on 44th. St. was combined into the San Fransisco Depot before it was sold to Frost & French Studebaker Dealership.
          So "Some" of these Parts might have been up and down the Coast THREE Times!

          That's Three Warehouse Stocks we do know about.
          Last edited by StudeRich; 01-12-2021, 07:22 PM.
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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          • #6
            To follow up after what Rich posted, the Pittsburg depot inventory was bought out by the late John Bradel. Barry Hackney bought the remnants of that inventory from the Bradel family about 4 years ago.

            Side note; going to look at the Bradel inventory was my job interview with Stephen. We drove up there right after New Year’s.. The parts were stored in a 3 story wooden barn that was well over 100 years old, and there was 6 inches of snow on the ground. Having spent all of my life living in the southeast, I don’t own clothes warm enough to handle a Pennsylvania winter. My toes and fingers are still thawing out.

            There was a depot inventory in Texas that was purchased by an individual but at the moment I can’t recall who it was. I think that may be where some of Bo Markham’s parts came from? If not, he’d know where they went.

            I’ve heard rumors that the Kansas City(?) depot inventory was used as filler to build an overpass.

            If Tony Caralla’s (A&M Garage) inventory was supplemented by of one of the depots, then the majority of it was scrapped after Tony died. But a small portion of it was bought by Dan Peterson in Vermont, and his inventory was purchased just a few months ago by Stephen Allen’s. There are a number of boxes labeled “AM” that we’ve been sorting through.

            It’s pretty fun to follow the trail these inventories follow after so many years. Some of these parts have traveled literally around the world before finally getting used on a Studebaker.

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            • #7
              Dick: Is there any record of what dates each of the Depots closed? It seems unlikely they would have all closed at the same time; perhaps the smaller ones would have closed first? Any record of that? BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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              • #8
                To add to what Matt said above about Tony Caralla's parts. I bought a small remnant of his Studebaker parts inventory from his grandson who was still running A&M garage doing general auto repair. Sadly his grandson told me that after Tony passed the family tried to sell the parts to local club members, who came and bought a few of the parts, however as the building where they were stored had been sold and no buyers were found they ended up being sold for scrap. I was a few weeks too late by the time I heard about them.
                Dan Peterson
                Montpelier, VT
                1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
                1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

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                • #9
                  I purchased a large amount of the parts from the Kansas City and Dallas depots through various dealerships that got the parts directly from them, after the close down. Also, purchased a large portion of Tony Caralla's parts from his daughter after he passed away.

                  Bo
                  Bo

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                  • #10
                    Oh good Bo glad to hear you got some of Tony's parts. From what the grandson said it was the parts in the basement of the house where he lived that went for scrap.
                    Dan Peterson
                    Montpelier, VT
                    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
                    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

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                    • #11
                      Dan,

                      Tony originally had the vast amount of his parts in a basement storage beneath a 5 story apartment building. I don't remember if he owned the building, or what? I remember the daughter was living in one of the apartments. About a year, or so after he passed away, the brother and I went up to scrounge parts at Newman & Altman and from Dennis Dupont, Bill Cathcart and a few other folks. On the way back South, through NY, we stopped in to visit with his daughter Louise (I think that's right) and loaded my 1 ton and 40' goose neck trailer full. The stuff was pigeon holed in every little space you could find. It took us 3 days to load everything. I'm being modest when I say I think we were a little over loaded. It didn't look like we even made a dent! After that, she'd send me a couple page lists periodically. She and a helper would box the stuff up and ship it in bulk. I still have some of those unopened boxes after all these years. She marked on them what was inside and I've never gotten around to opening them to see. I trusted her.

                      I just remembered that the building was sold at some point, which plays in with the remainder of the parts being moved to the grandson, which you mentioned. I think that most of the stuff that was scrapped was boat anchor. I've seen some of the stuff you sold to Stephen and I'm amazed at what I saw. NOS Hawk tail light housings!!!!!
                      Last edited by Bo Markham; 01-16-2021, 05:51 AM.
                      Bo

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                      • #12
                        Bill Cathcart purchased my stock (truck and trailer load) in about 1991. So probably some of what I had in NY retired to FL.
                        Gary L.
                        Wappinger, NY

                        SDC member since 1968
                        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 64V19816 View Post
                          A question I have long wondered....did Studebaker provide service and support for its horse drawn wagons and equipment after production ceased?
                          It did, to a point. One of the old dealerships I bought out in the 90's still had it's original sign from horse drawn wagon days (I still have it) and bits and pieces when it closed up in 66. I had to haul off lock, stock and (no pun intended) barrel. Some of the old company parts order invoices listed wagon parts ordered up to about 1933. My grandfather (father's side) was still using his old wagon into the 50's. Sadly, he and the wagon departed this world at about the same time. Both were pretty well worn out at the end.

                          Bo
                          Bo

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                          • #14
                            Here is some more background on the Allison Park Depot inventory. Sorry for the length of this story but it was fun reminiscing.

                            When Studebaker went under, the depot remained for a year or two then they hired a junk man to haul all of the parts to the dump. Before the parts were to be removed, personnel were ordered to damage the parts so they couldn't be resold. Several items were hit with a hammer, but they didn't put a dent in the vast amount of parts there (pun intended).

                            Sometime around 1967/68, the junk man made many trips to remove the parts but instead of heading to the dump, he piled them up in his back field! There was a mountain of parts.

                            In the late 1960s, my dad got rear ended in his 62 GT Hawk. He went asking around town for a trunk lid and someone told him that the junk man had some parts and might be able to help. Dad went to the junk man's home to buy a trunk lid and ended up buying the whole works!

                            It took many, many truck loads to move the parts to our farm north of Pittsburgh. As Matt said, we added two floors to the barn to help accommodate the inventory. That wasn't enough room so many parts were also in the garage, house, with the rest were stored outside for awhile. Outside were rows of NOS sheet metal including about 50 NOS Packard fenders wrapped in the thick paper and filler padding material. I spent many summers as a teenager working in the barn organizing and tagging the parts including about 200 rocker panels, for example. There was simply a lot of everything. It was hot up there in the barn during the summer and we made some progress, but there was still much to do.

                            Dad was a smoker. One day he was smoking and walked too close to the Packard fenders stored outside. Within a short period of time, the pile was on fire and he lost about 40 NOS fenders that day. It was sad but there was still at least a hundred fenders left inside and outside including C/K front and rear fenders and hoods and many other items.

                            Harold and Sara Hendricks were a Stude parts dealer from Punxsutawney, PA, a couple hours away. During the early 70's and 80s, Harold made regular trips to the farm to buy parts. I remember him digging out boxes of NOS 55 coupe front grille ends and other items. He left with a truck load each time. We would take a load ourselves to Reedsville then York every year starting in the early 70s. We made a lot of good friends during this time and would arrange to set up swap meet spots next to buddies Paul Johnson and Tom and Dave Shrock every year. It was fun.

                            We took a moving van to the Cincinnati National meet in 1976 filled to the top with good items. We placed 10 NOS in the box R1 Avanti chrome air cleaners on the table in a stack. As soon as they were placed on the table, a guy asked how much. Dad said $25 each. The guy said, "I'll take them all." Later that day, we took a walk down the swap meet aisle and noticed that same guy was a vendor and he had them on his table for $50 each. Dad was furious about this and didn't understand how someone could (in his mind) take advantage of him like that.

                            Anyway, when mom and dad passed, the remaining inventory went up for bid. Matt (with Stephen Allen) did come to look at the parts but it was a very blustery day in Pittsburgh and they didn't last long before jumping back in the truck and heading south for warmer weather (I don't blame them, it was that cold). Barry Hackney from Texas was the high bidder. He picked up the first load of parts just prior to the South Bend 2017 meet and drove straight there to vend. He sold many items but barely put a dent in his truck and trailer load. Later, he came back for a few more loads and now it is all gone. There was so much stuff that, when arranging the parts for viewing, there were still many boxes that we didn't even look through after all of these years. Barry spent a full day looking around and he still didn't see everything. He said, "I'm about done but let's look in these two boxes and call it a day." We opened them up and there were about 30 NOS main wiring harnesses untouched and perfect after all of these years.

                            In addition to the parts, mom and dad had about 70 Studebakers from 1914 to a 1967 Avanti II. All of these are gone now too. So, you can see that I grew up around Studebakers and have seen, touched, and handled more Studebaker parts over the years than I can ever describe. I still enjoy attending meets and driving and working on my own Studes. It has been an interesting and fun ride.

                            Hope you enjoyed this story. Jeff Bradel
                            Last edited by studefan; Yesterday, 10:13 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Great story Jeff, thanks for sharing.
                              Paul
                              Winston-Salem, NC
                              Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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