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1963 Lark Daytona Convertible 4 speed production numbers

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  • 1963 Lark Daytona Convertible 4 speed production numbers

    I know production numbers have been a topic covered in the past, but I havent been able to find any answers really specific to my question. I know that 1015 1963 Daytona convertibles were built, but does anyone have an idea of how many Daytona convertibles were built with a V8 and a 4 speed in 1963? I have a nice original 63 Daytona convertible with a V8 and a 4 speed and would love to know. Thanks!

  • #2
    Sorry I don't know, but I myself have a very rusty '63 Daytona convert with 259 and a 4 speed (black with red bucket seat interior). I would like to find one in very good condition, are you looking to sell yours?
    sigpic
    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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    • #3
      Milaca, I’m not looking to sell my car at this time. I like it way too much! Anyone else have an idea of production numbers?

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      • #4
        This question comes up often about Numbers of, Sorry to have to say it like it is... "not-significant ENOUGH Cars", they have not been counted until someone spends the Time and Money to research the Productions Orders to count them.

        Of course I know what you owners will say: my car is important to me, and many actually ARE Significant, like: Convertibles are Rare, 4 Speeds are in some models, Fleet Vehicles, Taxis, Police Cars etc. etc.
        But unfortunately, basically Only '63 and '64 Jet Thrust (Avanti Powered) Larks, Lark Types and GT Hawks HAVE been counted. Just because they are THE Most Significant Models, does not mean others are not, but the demand for that info has not YET gotten that important to enough owners.

        So, how many of you are ready to go to the Studebaker National Museum for a Week and Pay the Hourly Fee?
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #5
          I’ll offer a guess about 25% were 4 speeds.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Alex Dragone View Post
            I know production numbers have been a topic covered in the past, but I havent been able to find any answers really specific to my question. I know that 1015 1963 Daytona convertibles were built, but does anyone have an idea of how many Daytona convertibles were built with a V8 and a 4 speed in 1963? I have a nice original 63 Daytona convertible with a V8 and a 4 speed and would love to know. Thanks!
            I agree with your 1015 number. As has been said, someone would have to research all of the 1963 production orders to get the exact numbers that you are seeking. My guesstimate is 200 - 250 with V8 and four speed.

            As an aside, are you related to the Dragones of Connecticut that used to deal in collector cars in the 1970s? They tried to buy one of my 1953 Commander Starliners.
            Gary L.
            Wappinger, NY

            SDC member since 1968
            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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            • #7
              I believe George Krem noted that there were 21 R1 and 31 R2 1963 Convertibles. The transmission breakdowns were:
              4- powershift
              4- flightomatic
              2- 3 speed manuals
              31– 4 speed
              11- heavy duty flightomatic.

              In the case of jet thrust engines, 60% were 4 speeds. I’m not suggesting that 60% of all 63 convertibles were 4 speeds.
              Last edited by abkco; Today, 12:58 PM.

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              • #8
                Is it my imagination, or were there significantly more 1964 convertibles surviving then 1963? I realize that ownership is always in flux, but until recently I knew where about five of the 64's were, in the state of Washington, but only one 63, and I haven't seen that one in five or six years.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
                  Is it my imagination, or were there significantly more 1964 convertibles surviving then 1963? I realize that ownership is always in flux, but until recently I knew where about five of the 64's were, in the state of Washington, but only one 63, and I haven't seen that one in five or six years.
                  Yes, that it is common for the last of something to survive better than prior years. I guess that it is because you can't get another new one. It is similar for Hawks. I believe that the survival rate of 1964 Hawks is much higher than that for 1963s. For example, the guy that I bought my '64 Hawk from had purchased a new Hawk every model year from 1956 through 1964 including two new 1964s. He kept the second 1964 about ten years when I bought it from him.
                  Gary L.
                  Wappinger, NY

                  SDC member since 1968
                  Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                  • #10
                    Thanks Gary, so others have noticed the same thing. I have two 1962 Daytona converts, and a 63 Daytona htp, but the 1963 convertibles are really rare today. A young family man showed up at one of our Seattle meetings, a number of years ago, never to be seen again. That's the last time I saw one. Anyone out there have one out there that they would like to share with the forum members?

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