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After-market wheel studs

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  • After-market wheel studs

    Working on the '58 Scotsman and hoped to convert my left threaded driver side hub and drums to right threaded wheel studs. As a p/t parts driver for our local Autozone, I searched for the studs using year, make & model. Our computer gave me a Dorman number for a box of 10 for my car. Great! Took both the drums and new studs to my machine shop only to get a call a day or two later saying the new ones are slightly larger and won't work. The owner of the shop said this has become a common occurrence lately with after-market studs.
    He suggested I contact a Stude vendor for NOS right threaded ones, which I have. Wondering if anyone else has had a similar situation, whether with studs or anything from off shore..?

  • #2
    Dorman 610-036

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    • #3
      The Studebaker studs are a BIG press fit. They are smooth with no serrations and if I remember right they are .020" larger than the hole they fit into. A much heavier press than most.
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Press..????? Put a few large washers on the thread size, then the lug nut and a socket wrench to pull them thru...
        64 GT Hawk (K7)
        1970 Avanti (R3)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 64V-K7 View Post
          Press..????? Put a few large washers on the thread size, then the lug nut and a socket wrench to pull them thru...
          OK, but how do you get the old ones out without a press?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 64V-K7 View Post
            Press..????? Put a few large washers on the thread size, then the lug nut and a socket wrench to pull them thru...
            Have you tried it with Studebaker studs? True, that will work with most makes serrated studs, but not the Stude ones. Well, without having the hub securly fastened in a big vice and using a large breaker bar with a long piece of pipe for a handle; then you'd probably mess up the threads and have to start over.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              It's the Dorman 610-036 I was using and the fit is wrong, says my long-time & trusted machinist. I'll live with left threads before I ruin my hubs.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tomnoller View Post
                It's the Dorman 610-036 I was using and the fit is wrong, says my long-time & trusted machinist. I'll live with left threads before I ruin my hubs.
                Over the last couple of months, I have pressed about 20 old studs out, and 20 Dormans. I used a 12T press, and hod no problems whatsoever. I do recall when a local machinist had trouble pressing the old ones out he was not familiar with swaging which Studebaker practiced. I schooled him but do not even bother to use his services for studs anymore, since I now have an easy way to remove the swag. Perhaps yours still has part of the swag in place?

                I also noticed when I pressed old studs out of an OEM 56J hub, it had serrated studs, whereas all the others were non-serrated. Further, the 1956 hub had a much cleaner cut around the swag. So I guess quality of parts and labor both began to decline sometime after 1956.

                As for clearance, I'd guess there was about .005 interference fit for the studs and holes I dealt with. Just tight enough for the 12T press handle to get firm, but still easy to operate.

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                • #9
                  Currie Enterprises has a good selection of wheel studs and they have a good variety of sizes, a serrated stud .005 over will press in very easily and be very tight. If the exact size isn't available you can drill the hub to fit. I had used a drill that was .005 under the stud and it pressed in ok.

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                  • #10
                    Why not purchase some NOS Studebaker wheel studs - 196930, then you know you have the correct size?
                    Dan Peterson
                    Montpelier, VT
                    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
                    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

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                    • #11
                      Just as cheap to order from Stude Intl, I just take an angle grinder, cut mine off, knock em out.

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