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  • 49 2r5 transmission

    Need help on making a 49 2r5 more road friendly. It's a 4 speed with a 4.83 rear end. Need to get Motor rpms down, and run 50-60mph.

  • #2
    A 3-speed with overdrive solves your problems neatly. The over drive ratio is 0.7 so your net axle ratio becomes about 3.38:1, about all the small 6 can handle. Jerry Kurtz can provide the transmission. You will need to get the driveshaft cut, welded, and rebalanced. You will then have 5 useable transmission speeds, better and cheaper than just changing the rear end ratio. You may need a new bell housing, but they are available.
    Gary Ash
    Dartmouth, Mass.

    '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
    ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
    '48 M5
    '65 Wagonaire Commander
    '63 Wagonaire Standard
    web site at http://www.studegarage.com

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    • #3
      I agree with Gary! I did this conversion several years ago with a 2R5 w/straight 3 speed, and the OD really made a difference, especially on the highway (not freeway tho!). My biggest hassle was finding all the electrical parts, as I was also going to 12 volts, but everything else went pretty smooth.

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      • #4
        It might be less complicated to change the rear end gearing. The 4 speed would be able to deal with a higher geared rear axle ratio with no problem.

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        • #5
          Unless it has been replaced with a more modern unit, the 4-speed in a 1949 2R5 would be a non-synchro Warner T9, which many people feel is best used as a boat anchor. While there are a few masochists who enjoy double-clutching at every shift, most of us prefer something that has synchros in at least second and third.
          Skip Lackie

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          • #6
            Thanks Gary,
            I spoke with Jerry yesterday. He said all his transmissions were 3sp column shift, but if I sent him a jeep shift he could make it floor shift. I'm not really sure how to proceed. I'd prefer the 4sp because not many came with one, and I'm leaning toward rear end gearing, but don't know how difficult this approach will be. I would appreciate any input you can regarding re-gearing the rear end.

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            • #7
              You may have trouble finding lower-ratio gears to fit that axle.
              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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              • #8
                The 3-speed with overdrive transmission has many advantages over just changing the rear axle ratio. With overdrive, you get five speeds: 1, 2, 2nd overdrive, 3, 3rd overdrive. Sure, 2nd overdrive and straight 3rd are not too different, but there are times when driving in stop-and-go traffic or entering a highway on-ramp, that 2nd overdrive is useful. When you are in 3rd overdrive, the engine speed drops to 70% of normal 3rd gear, so it turns your 4.82 rear end ratio to an equivalent of 3.37. Generally, you will be using 1, 2, 3, 3rd overdrive, so it's like a 4-speed but you only have to lift your foot off the gas an instant to shift, not move a lever. With 6.00-16 tires (~28.5" diameter), you'll be turning about 2400 rpm at 60 mph in overdrive using the 4.82 rear end. The Champ 6 will be very happy there, and you can go 65-70 mph if the road is smooth and your brakes are up to it.

                First gear in a T9 4-speed is 6.4:1 ratio, great for pulling stumps, but not useful for more than a few seconds starting off. Second gear in the T9 is 3.09 ratio, closer to what most 3-speed boxes use for 1st gear. Conclusion: 1st gear in a T9 is about useless if you are not hauling rocks in your truck.

                Studebaker provided 4.82, 4.55, and 4.09 ratios in the Dana 41 axle. If you found a 1950-ish Ford F1 truck or Ford/Mercury station wagon in a junk yard, you might get a 3.91 (or thereabouts) ratio. There may be some 1947-51 Kaisers or Frazers with 3.73 ratio gears in a Dana 41, just go find one in a junk yard. There are not any gears that I ever heard of for a Dana 41 that get down to 3.5 or lower. If you do want to swap ring and pinions, you also need a different carrier in the rear - very hard to find. And, if you have the axle apart, it's a good time to install all new bearings, and that is not cheap.

                If you put a 3.31 ratio rear end in your truck, using a later Dana 44 truck axle up through 1955, that poor little Champ 6 would grunt and groan to get you going as you slipped the clutch a lot with a standard 3-speed. Later Dana 44 axles are 3 inches wider.

                My 1948 M5 has the 4.82 axle and 3-speed with overdrive, 6.50-16 tires (6 ply). It cruises nicely at 60-65, has been over 70 mph, but bumps at high speed are uncomfortable. It "rides like a truck". Dragstrip time was 24.5 seconds at 49 mph for the quarter mile. Yee haw!
                Gary Ash
                Dartmouth, Mass.

                '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
                ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
                '48 M5
                '65 Wagonaire Commander
                '63 Wagonaire Standard
                web site at http://www.studegarage.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gordr View Post
                  You may have trouble finding lower-ratio gears to fit that axle.
                  I put a 3.54 ring and pinion out of a lark in my '50 2R5 when I put in the Lark's 259 and automatic.
                  Drove it first with the old 5.13 gears; was like a '53 Olds hydro across the street!

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                  • #10
                    There is an outfit in CA, called Gearvendors, (www.gearvendors.com) that makes underdrive/overdrive for restoration or classic vehicles. I'm sure that they are not cheap, but may be an option that would work for you.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks Gary! Great information! Much appreciated!!!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tsenecal View Post
                        There is an outfit in CA, called Gearvendors, (www.gearvendors.com) that makes underdrive/overdrive for restoration or classic vehicles. I'm sure that they are not cheap, but may be an option that would work for you.
                        Yes, the Gearvendors unit is a really nice setup. Those considering it should be aware of a few things:

                        1. The Gearvendors overdrive is only .78 instead of the more typical .70 of the T86/T96 or the .72 of the T85/T89. It is better than the .82 of the Stude 5-speed trucks.

                        2. FWIW, the typical Gearvendors installation costs $3500 - $6,000

                        Rvs Trucks Cars Racing Install & Driveshaft RVs&Trucks
                        A $2,895 $2,695 $850
                        B $2,995 $2,795 $850
                        C $3,095 $2,895 $950
                        D $3,295 $2,995 $950
                        E $3,395 $3,095 $950
                        F $3,495 $3,295 $950
                        G $3,695 $3,695 $1050
                        H $4,995 $4,995 $2,000

                        jack vines
                        PackardV8

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