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Thread: Now you can have your own Steam Locomotive

  1. #1
    Silver Hawk Member
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    Jan 2008
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    Bay City, Mi., USA.
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    Now you can have your own Steam Locomotive

    For sale on Ebay, pay for it then "drive" it home. Probably hard to ship.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/233227123031?ul_noapp=true

    Bob
    , ,

  2. #2
    Speedster Member
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    Mar 2018
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    Los Altos CA, USA
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    Fly and drive?

  3. #3
    Speedster Member
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    Green Bay WI
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    Honey.......look what followed me home (you said we NEEDED a new Weber grill), this would take care of all the drift wood on the beach and NO fire pit regulations!! Sherm / Green Bay 63R1089

  4. #4
    Silver Hawk Member
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    I believe that there are fewer than a dozen 2-10-4 steam locomotives left in North America, mostly ex-Santa Fe. It would be a shame to see this one scrapped. It is/was a very modern locomotive, built right at the end of the steam age. OTOH, as some museums have found out, the larger and more modern a steam locomotive is, the more it costs to restore and maintain it. That's why most operating RR museums stick to old, small steam locomotives. Another reason to be thankful that the Union Pacific went all in on the restoration of the 4014.

  5. #5
    President Member junior's Avatar
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    calgary, alberta, Canada.
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    Ran when parked... just sayin' wondering how much that monster weighs, and would it be remotely possible to transport on a road? cheers, junior

    1954 C5 Hamilton car.

  6. #6
    Silver Hawk Member
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    Just a guesstimate, about 250 tons (not counting tender), about 5000 horsepower and 96,000 pounds of tractive effort. Locomotives that large are normally delivered by rail, for both weight and height considerations. Even on a low, multi-wheel trailer, they are too tall to fit under power lines -- and they can crush things like sewer and water pipes. In 1962,I watched the movement of a much smaller Southern RR 4-6-2 locomotive a few miles from the closest rail head to the Smithsonian Institution, where it is still on display. It required two 12-hour nights and a specially built trailer. Steel plates had to be laid on the roadway ahead of it as the tractor trailer moved at 1-2 mph.

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