Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 121 to 157 of 157

Thread: 1964 Daytona Hardtop Rescue Effort

  1. #121
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36

    Update........It's Alive!

    Thanks Nox. I actually did drive it on Tuesday!

    It started right up after filling the fuel bowl thru the vent tube. The timing needed a little adjustment, but the idle mixture and the dwell was right on. After going thru the heating and cooling sequence to cure the VHT coating on the exhaust, it was time to drive. Thank goodness the T-10 shifted great! Just a little chatter out of the clutch starting off in first gear, but I think that will go away since it wasn't doing that before. The handling is great, hopefully will be even better when the new front coil springs go in.

    Last night I started on the bodywork. First area is the passenger side rear wheelwell, in front of the wheel. A relatively small hole that needs repair. Spent about an hour on it cleaning off the undercoating and developing a plan of action. This should not be too complicated to repair. Below is a picture of the area, just below. Note the factory paint that is still on the metal, it was protected by the undercoating. Will post more pics later this week of the repair. After that is done, it will be time to pull the drivers side door and rear quarter off to replace the forward inner rear quarter panel (the panel that has the 'rear' door post, where the lock plate is).



    More to follow...................
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  2. #122
    Golden Hawk Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Wappingers Falls, New York, USA.
    Posts
    22,267
    Why pull the door off. It seems to me that this is just asking for extra work.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  3. #123
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by studegary View Post
    Why pull the door off. It seems to me that this is just asking for extra work.
    Because the drivers side door is as lumpy as a sack of potatoes and the hinges are terrible! It will be replaced with a NOS door and NOS hinges.
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  4. #124
    Golden Hawk Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Wappingers Falls, New York, USA.
    Posts
    22,267
    Quote Originally Posted by r1lark View Post
    Because the drivers side door is as lumpy as a sack of potatoes and the hinges are terrible! It will be replaced with a NOS door and NOS hinges.
    Thanks! That makes sense. From your post, I got the idea that you were pulling the door relative to the rust repair.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  5. #125
    President Member Noxnabaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1,070
    Congratulations! Not that I would wanna have a 60's Studebaker rather than a 50's but for the rest!!!
    (I used to have rust in all 4 corners of the floor/walls; cut-&-weld cured that fast.)


    Josephine
    -55
    Champion V8
    4d sedan

  6. #126
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by studegary View Post
    Thanks! That makes sense. From your post, I got the idea that you were pulling the door relative to the rust repair.
    The rust I'm starting on is on the passenger side, but that's pretty much it on that side. But the drivers door and outer rear quarter and the front portion of the inner rear quarter will be replaced with NOS stuff.
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  7. #127
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Got a chance to work on the rust repair this week. Love working in 95 degree weather and what feels like 90% humidity

    See picture in post #121 showing the starting point.

    Anyway, got everything cut out..........and of course had to cut further than originally thought to get to good solid metal. So much for "take a flat piece of sheetmetal, form it on the sandbag, and weld it in". The first piece was a fairly complicated 90 degree piece, with an added formed/curved area that forms the seal between the inner rear quarter and the outer rear quarter. The second piece was easier, but still needed a c-shaped flange formed.

    Unfortunately it looks like I didn't take a picture of the first piece before welding it in, but you should be able to get a good idea of what it looks like from the pictures. I like to use plug welds to attach pieces like this, but had a lot of trouble plug welding to the floor pan........my fault since I should have done a some grinding of the weld areas after sandblasting, and also because I naively believed the wonderful weld-thru primer that was $20 a can could actually be welded thru. So the welds to the floor look kinda ugly but they are solid welds.

    Double click the pictures to bring up larger ones.

    Still cutting, with the hole getting larger each time:
    DSC04820.jpg

    I use CAD to design the repair pieces: Cardboard Aided Design :
    DSC04824.jpg

    First section, installed, shown from inside the wheelwell:
    DSC04831.jpg

    Another pic, from inside showing the rest of the first section:
    DSC04830.jpg

    Second section, ready to weld in with holes for plug welds and weld thru primer on the places that can't be reached for paint after installing:
    DSC04829.jpg

    Final fit up of the second section, mainly to mark the plug weld 'underneath' locations so the "weld thru" primer can be removed in those areas.
    DSC04833.jpg

    Tomorrow is supposed to be a nice day, so we will get this welded in, clean up the weld thru primer overspray and coat inside and out with self-etching primer, and get some paint on the sections. Then some seam sealer, and undercoating on the outside. And some POR-15 on some floor areas around the repaired areas.

    Anyone know of a modern undercoating product that matches the look of the thick factory asphalt undercoating? I've been using 3M but it's no where as thick.......so you can definitely tell where the original undercoating ends and the 3M starts.

    Also this weekend, get the passenger side rear quarter window and regulator out, clean/paint, replace the window rollers and cat whiskers, reinstall, and get the window working smoothly. Then it's time to move to the drivers side for major work (new door, new outer rear quarter panel, and new inner rear quarter (forward section that has the door lock post).
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  8. #128
    President Member Noxnabaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1,070
    Cool!
    (A wee bit much overlap for my taste, but on the other hand I don't overlap at all & now that I did put louvers on the hood I got almost a millimeter gap on one whole side on one of them to fill... & when people ask me to weld their stuff in this manner & they say they don't mind overlap & I figure it's their car & still only do about one mill that mostly melts into the weld anyway, just can't help it.)


    Josephine
    -55
    Champion V8
    4d sedan

  9. #129
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Nox, unfortunately my welding skills are mediocre at best, so I'll tend to use butt welds only where the repair will show.

    Inside the car, the new pieces will be hidden by the seat so they were overlapped (in some areas flanged). Not sure I would have ever gotten the more complicated section to fit correctly with consistent gaps everywhere if I had tried to butt weld that one.
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  10. #130
    Golden Hawk Member jclary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Greer, sc, USA.
    Posts
    10,607
    Quote Originally Posted by r1lark View Post
    Nox, unfortunately my welding skills are mediocre at best, so I'll tend to use butt welds only where the repair will show.

    Inside the car, the new pieces will be hidden by the seat so they were overlapped (in some areas flanged). Not sure I would have ever gotten the more complicated section to fit correctly with consistent gaps everywhere if I had tried to butt weld that one.
    Paul, allow me to offer a wee bit of encouragement. First, I must confess that I have not taken the time to read all your progress on this project. Attempting to be a caregiver to my 97-year-old mother and finally paying enough attention to my wife's health (she works so hard to care for others to the risk of her own health), has kept me from spending as much time monitoring the forum as I once did.

    Regarding butt-welds vs overlap welds...done properly, I think both methods are acceptable. In either case, once the task is completed, key to success is to get the repair sealed away from oxygen exposure. Working in industrial sales over the years, I was often tasked to develop, innovate, and engineer custom systems to solve specific problems in order to gain success in a very competitive environment. Having exposure to such a variety of work-related challenges and my auto hobby worked very well for the benefit of both interests. Many of the methods required for huge manufacturing facilities are the same in a backyard garage, just on a smaller scale. Even in what the average "layman" assumes is a highly automated manufacturing process, folks may be surprised at how much human hands are involved. That is especially the case in our older vintage cars. For example, the body panels of our late 1940's and 1950's cars were not necessarily one piece stampings. Where they were joined together, there were flanged edges for an even "overlap." However, especially in non-cosmetic areas, once you strip away the "leaded" seams (or body filler), you often find hammer marks where the seams were hand-peened together. Sometimes these overlaps will be as much as a half inch. The key is to seal them up from moisture and exposure to oxygen (air).

    So, my encouragement to you is to keep welding, massaging, forming, drilling, fastening, and banging away! You are making great progress! There is no "assembly line speed," to worry about...no supervisor to pick at you, no union boss to suck up to, or any other deadline, except to one you set for yourself. For undercoat or sealer, I suggest you consult with a reputable supplier of auto finishing and paint. I have been out of the industry for over a decade now and I'm pretty sure new products have probably come along. A good supplier will want you to succeed as it reflects back to their success. If they can't answer your questions, they probably can refer you to someone who can.

    When you're done...I want a ride!
    John Clary
    Greer, SC
    [IMG][/IMG]
    SDC member since 1975

  11. #131
    Golden Hawk Member 8E45E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    , , Canada.
    Posts
    16,203
    Quote Originally Posted by jclary
    However, especially in non-cosmetic areas, once you strip away the "leaded" seams (or body filler), you often find hammer marks where the seams were hand-peened together. Sometimes these overlaps will be as much as a half inch.
    The key is to seal them up from moisture and exposure to oxygen (air).
    Good advice! Even factory-finished seams are prone to failure:



    Craig

  12. #132
    President Member Noxnabaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1,070
    I didn't mean to be rude, I'm just a bit picky myself with overlaps & I see your cardboard pieces are just as mine, but when the final plate is tried in place you could (if you want to be as silly & picky as me(!)) trim off a wee bit more, I'm just nervous about rust between the plates.
    & as stated above: sealing in time when still warm & dry is the winner in any case.
    & you should see my welds... Not smoth or fancy at all!


    Josephine
    -55
    Champion V8
    4d sedan

  13. #133
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by Noxnabaker View Post
    I didn't mean to be rude, I'm just a bit picky myself with overlaps & I see your cardboard pieces are just as mine, but when the final plate is tried in place you could (if you want to be as silly & picky as me(!)) trim off a wee bit more, I'm just nervous about rust between the plates.
    & as stated above: sealing in time when still warm & dry is the winner in any case.
    & you should see my welds... Not smoth or fancy at all!
    Nox, I didn't take your comments as rude at all! I wish I could do all the welds as butt welds but it would take me twice as long (and it takes me a long time as it is ).

    John Clary, thanks for the encouragement. The seams are definitely getting seam sealer, inside and outside. And on the outside, there will be undercoating over that.

    I used some 3M/Dynatron seam sealer today but didn't like it. It skims over so quickly that the time to smooth it out is very very limited. Anyone have any good seam sealer recommendations?
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  14. #134
    President Member Colgate Studebaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Citrus Springs Florida
    Posts
    1,111
    I've used SEM in the past and it worked very well. I don't know where you'd get it but it shouldn't be hard to find. Bill

  15. #135
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Thanks Bill, I'll check into it. My favorite parts store carries the SEM line.
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  16. #136
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36

    Update on Work Completed

    Been a little while since I've updated the progress on the Studebaker Rescue '64 Daytona hardtop. Following is a summary with pictures:

    Finished the rust repair in the front of the passenger side rear wheelwell, including self etching primer, paint, seam sealer, and undercoating:




    Don't know why this following pic is rotated 90 degrees clockwise???


    Coated front portion of the inner rear quarter and the floorboards close to it with POR-15 (still have to apply the seam sealer):


    Removed passenger side rear quarter window, polished stainless frame, cleaned rust from lower channel and coated with Dupli-Color Rust Fix and painted with Stainless Steel spray paint. Cleaned area between inner and outer passenger side rear quarter (under r/q window), vacuumed out, made sure drains were open, and coated seam with POR-15.......but no pictures of this . Cleaned and lubed the passenger side rear quarter window regulator. Removed passenger side r/q window upper retainer, polished, installed my patented new improved catwhisker substitute, and reinstalled:




    The passenger side r/q window lower rubber stop was missing, and I didn't have a new one and SI doesn't list them (at least not in the catalog). So.......made one and installed it. Here is the cobbled up one (on right) next to an original on my '62 Daytona hardtop:

    Made some 'flathead' bolts (washers welded to the end of a 1/4"-20 bolt and the head cut off, countersunk them into a 1/4" piece of conveyer belt and JB weld epoxied them in, then used 3M super adhesive to glue a larger rubber block to that. Looks a little different, but is the same height & width and works just fine. Here is a pic of it installed in place:


    Got some NOS outer r/q catwhiskers with clips so will install the passenger side tomorrow and get the window and regulator back in. Will get some pics of all that.

    Next will be to pull the passenger side door window glass, vent window, and regulator........clean and POR-15 the bottom of the door, replace window rollers, clean/lube, and reinstall everything.
    Last edited by r1lark; 07-20-2018 at 09:04 AM. Reason: grammer and spelling correction (for studegary)
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  17. #137
    Golden Hawk Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Wappingers Falls, New York, USA.
    Posts
    22,267
    "Last edited by r1lark; Today at 08:54 PM. Reason: grammer and spelling correction (for studegary)"

    If you were doing that for me, then you should also correct "grammer" (sic) to grammar.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

  18. #138
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    That was for you Gary .

    Usually I just correct spellin'........................
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  19. #139
    President Member Noxnabaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1,070
    Making my own stuff is what I also do many times, nice to see your solutions!


    Josephine
    -55
    Champion V8
    4d sedan

  20. #140
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36

    New Studebaker Rescue Video!

    New Studebaker Rescue video has been posted on YouTube - first in a series of rebuilding the vent window assembly.

    Link: https://youtu.be/KuKKrFr-vdA
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  21. #141
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36

    Studebaker Rescue - Part 2 of the Vent Window Rebuild Videos

    Part 2 of the Studebaker Rescue '64 Daytona vent window rebuild series. This one deals with installing a new lower pivot (the one that always seems to break) with semi-tubular rivets as was originally done.

    Video Link: https://youtu.be/qlqz6sbmUuY

    Studebaker Rescue Video #39 Vent Window Pivot Replacement_Capture.jpg
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  22. #142
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36

    Drivers Side Sheetmetal Replacement

    Started on the biggest job to be done to the '64 Daytona - replacing the front half of the inner rear quarter panel, the outer rear quarter panel, and the door, all on the drivers side. This car had been sideswiped and the drivers side door and rear quarter had been 'sort of' replaced. By sort of, I mean not a very good job was done on the replacement with less than perfect used parts. The door striker post (guess that's called the 'B pillar'?) was sort of straightened. I saw all of this when I purchased the car, so planned this work from the start......obtaining NOS door, rear quarter, and front half inner rear quarter from Newman & Altman. (Oh yeah, that was about 1988 . Picked it all up at York, and remember complaining to Dennis about the cost of the inner panel......and he knocked about 50% off that piece.)

    In the process of taking the old stuff off - rear quarter and rocker is off:


    Damage to bottom half latch pillar on inner rear quarter, I had no hopes of ever getting this straightened out; note the bent up and badly straightened rocker also. It's a lot worse than it looks like in the picture:


    NOS front half of inner rear quarter panel:


    Inner r/q panel part number sticker:
    DSC04990 resized.jpg

    You can see my 'centerline' pink string in the first pic. This is stretched front to back at the exact centerline of the car, and gives me something to measure to while taking my reference measurements. Luckily even though the latch pillar got pretty bent up, the inner r/q did not get bent inward. All the measurements to center match the passenger side perfectly.

    Next step is to carefully cut the old front half inner rear quarter out. The 90 degree flange will need to be repaired under the inner r/q panel where the rocker bolts to it, and a small rust area on the floor replaced. After that, surface rust cleaning and POR-15 onto the floor, and then fit and tack weld the new inner r/q panel in. (Yep, I know I'll have to grind the POR-15 off on the spots where the welding has to be done.) Then the new rocker panel and outer rear quarter can be test fit.

    More pictures to follow as the work progresses.
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  23. #143
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Had a decent day today, although it was rainy out. Managed to work between showers. Took a while to drill out spot welds, cut welds, cut with the recip saw, etc on the inner rear quarter panel. But did get it out, and got all the small pieces cut off. Tomorrow it's supposed to rain again, and the next day, and the next day, and the next day............ But, I can be making repair panels. Underneath the big 'foot' right at the door lock pillar (post), there was some rust so that will need to be cut out and replaced. also, the front of the rear wheelwell has some rust (like the passenger side) that will need to be repaired also. Following are some pics.

    This pic shows some of the drilling spot welds and cutting welds on the big 'foot' right at the door lock pillar (post):


    Spotwelds drilled out where the inner r/q panel ties to the roof sail panel:


    Front half inner r/q panel is out!! and all the remaining pieces removed:


    Some rust in the floorboard under the 'foot', will need to cut out several inches past the white outline to get a good foundation for the foot to be welded to:


    Area of front inner wheel well that needs to be repaired; you are looking from inside the car towards the tire (the tire is covered with a towel). Much better access than the passenger side now that the outer r/q and front part of the inner r/q are off:


    Hopefully more progress tomorrow, making patches. Doubt that I'll be able to weld any of them in though because of the rain, but we will see.
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  24. #144
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Well, I see it's been over a week since I posted an update. My younger son came in for a week from Scottsdale AZ and we have been doing family things most of the week.

    Got the rusted area cut out. Went farther than the rust so the 'B' pillar (the post that the door striker attaches to, which is part of the front half inner rear quarter) would have fully solid new metal to be attached to. There is internal (guess 'underfloor' is a more descriptive term) bracing in this area that provides a solid support for the B pillar. Here is a pic of the floor cut away, and some of the factory spotwelds marked on the underfloor bracing. The underfloor bracing is thick stuff; didn't measure it but it's more than 1/8". Note the number of spot welds that attached the floorboard to the bracing in this area.......and I'm sure there were some that I couldn't find also. I'll plug weld the new floor section to the bracing.


    There is some pitting on the braces, but not as bad as the picture makes it look........plus as mentioned the braces are really thick. After cleaning up the braces, a rust conversion (Dupli-Color Rust Fix) was used to kill the remaining rust as shown in the pic below. It's since been painted, but I'll have to remove the coating in the areas where the floor piece will be plug welded to the bracing.


    Here are a few pics of the replacement floorboard piece. This has already drilled with 5/16" holes for plug welding to the braces, but don't have a picture of that. Besides the plug welds, the floorboard seams will be butt welded to the existing floorboard.




    As mentioned, the floorboard replacement piece has been drilled for the plug welds, and the underside has been coated with self-etch primer and VHT Epoxy Chassis Paint (except for the areas around each plug weld which were masked off with small squares of tape). Hopefully tomorrow afternoon after work, do one final cleanup of the original floorboard where the butt welds will be made, and get the coating off the plug weld areas on the bracing, and get this piece welded in (or at least get started). Tuesday is an off day from work so hopefully can finish the welding and start on the repair of the front part of the rear wheelwell.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  25. #145
    Speedster Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    367
    I love these photos as they help me to realize I can do a bunch of these repairs myself. Thanks for doing this!

    Do you have a brake to bend the metal? It seems like that would be a needed tool for this work.

    Thanks

  26. #146
    Speedster Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    367
    Also, the videos you create are SUPER helpful, please keep those up!

  27. #147
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Thanks creegster! Glad this helps some folks, same reason I do the videos. (I'm just slow because I got roped into doing consulting work after I retired, has really cut into the car time.)

    I have a brake, but it's a cheapie Harbor Freight one that really can't bend the thick floorboard metal too easily. I did one of the two bends on the offset with the brake, but the other bend was done with a MAPP torch and a piece of 1/4" square stock. The 90 degree bend was done with a piece of angle iron and the MAPP torch also (and some scrap steel plate, lots of clamps, etc). The tweaks to curve it slightly were done against one of the vertical support posts in my basement . You can do this stuff with minimal fancy tools, it just takes longer. No English Wheels, power hammers, etc here. I do have a leather shot bag (actually has sand in it, instead of shot) and some nylon hammers that help me make compound curved pieces, one body hammer and three dollies, etc.

    I've got several more videos to put up on YouTube, on the vent window refurb so stay tuned.
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  28. #148
    Speedster Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by r1lark View Post
    Thanks creegster! Glad this helps some folks, same reason I do the videos. (I'm just slow because I got roped into doing consulting work after I retired, has really cut into the car time.)

    I have a brake, but it's a cheapie Harbor Freight one that really can't bend the thick floorboard metal too easily. I did one of the two bends on the offset with the brake, but the other bend was done with a MAPP torch and a piece of 1/4" square stock. The 90 degree bend was done with a piece of angle iron and the MAPP torch also (and some scrap steel plate, lots of clamps, etc). The tweaks to curve it slightly were done against one of the vertical support posts in my basement . You can do this stuff with minimal fancy tools, it just takes longer. No English Wheels, power hammers, etc here. I do have a leather shot bag (actually has sand in it, instead of shot) and some nylon hammers that help me make compound curved pieces, one body hammer and three dollies, etc.

    I've got several more videos to put up on YouTube, on the vent window refurb so stay tuned.
    Even more wonderful, useful information. Keep it up, its great!

  29. #149
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36

    New Video - Continuing on the Vent Window Refurb

    Latest video installment, continuing with the vent window refurbishment.

    Here is the link: https://youtu.be/WPIEJDZ7gvA


    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  30. #150
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Working around thunder and showers today, got the floor panel welded in, welds ground down, and primed with self-etching primer. A lot of welding with all the plug welds, plus the seam welds. The seam welds are butt welds, so was a series of small tacks - whew, that takes a while!

    Here are a few pics. First, the panel clamped in place, ready to start welding. The plug welds holes are 5/16" diameter. Pretty much the plug welds match the factory spot weld pattern, remember that these spot welds firmly attach the floor panel to the underfloor bracing below, then the striker pillar posts welds to the floor pan:

    By the way, I hate those black China clamps. They don't stay straight like the real ViseGrip ones.

    Here is the panel with all the welding done (except a few plug welds on the where the old and new 90 degree flange mates up). Couldn't get a shot from underneath, but got really good penetration on the butt welds (even though they don't look very pretty):


    Welds all ground down and primed with self-etching primer. The back side butt welds were primed also:


    Next step is to test fit the new inner front half rear quarter so I can get the patch made for the front wheel well. That will be Friday since Wednesday and Thursday are work days (plus it is supposed to rain too).
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  31. #151
    President Member tsenecal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Elko NV
    Posts
    1,043
    Making progress! Sounds like not too much more rust repair, and you can start on the more enjoyable parts of the restore. It will be a good solid car when you're done.

  32. #152
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by tsenecal View Post
    Making progress! Sounds like not too much more rust repair, and you can start on the more enjoyable parts of the restore. It will be a good solid car when you're done.
    Thanks Tom! Yes, making progress. Hopefully tomorrow will show even more progress - test fitting the inner r/q panel, and start cutting out the areas under the driver's feet that are thin. Supposed to be a nice day here tomorrow..........fingers crossed!
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  33. #153
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Got the inner r/q panel fit up yesterday, but it took a lot more time than I expected. Had to do some massaging on the floorboard where it was pushed up, but that wasn't too bad. It was figuring out what was causing the panel not to fit correctly that was the hard part. No pictures of the inner r/q fitup .

    Today was a short day on the car, since we had a work day at church this morning. Did get several things done though. The inner r/q has a 'tab' that welds to the outer flange of the floorboard, but the flange is inset in this area. The inset does two things - keeps the tab from interfering with the rocker panel fit, and also allows this tab to be fastened solidly to the outer end of underfloor bracing. I knew this inset was supposed to be there, but chose to wait until the new floor piece was installed before making it. Here is a pic:


    Also had to reinforce an area on the flange that has two outer rear quarter & rocker panel mounting holes; this area of the flange had been bent and stretched and the holes were somewhat out of shape once the flange was straightened by some hammer and dolly work. This area was reinforced by adding a plug welded doubler plate behind it with the correct size holes. Sorry, no pic.

    Last area to repair was another r/q and rocker panel mounting hole just in front of the rear wheel, this is a double thickness here with the flange plus a thicker underfloor brace. The flange had some rust so got it cut out, made a replacement piece with the correct hole, and butt welded it in. Welds were ground down and smoothed, and a coat of self-etching primer put on. Did get a pic of this:


    Next step is to use some self-drilling/self tapping screws to temporarily attach the inner r/q panel in its correct location, then test fit the rear quarter and rocker panel to make sure everything lines up. This is why I wanted to fix the mounting holes now. Stay tuned.
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  34. #154
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Update................can't believe it's been almost a month! A four day vacation in Gatlingburg/Pigeon Forge TN last week, plus an extra long work week this week (4 days ) has slowed progress.

    Cleaned up the back half of the inner rear quarter. Found a little rust out at the bottom rear, but also a poorly done repair along the rest of the bottom covered in undercoating (pic taken before scraping this undercoating off):


    Had to cut out a long strip at the bottom and make a new piece. New piece was flanged and plug welded in. Here it is with welds ground down and self etching primer before applying the seam sealer. For some reason don't have a pic of after seam sealer and painting:


    Got the front half of the inner rear quarter positioned correctly, and temporarily bolted in with self drilling screws. Plan is to put the outer rear quarter panel and new door on to check fit and gaps before welding the front half of the inner rear quarter in:




    The rear quarter fits really good, and the door opening is square. A quick measurement seems to indicate the door gaps will be good. Dug out the NOS hinges and NOS door:




    Got the old hinges off, and the new hinges on last night. Friday will fit the door and make sure it will align properly with the front fender and rear quarter. If it does (fingers crossed), the door and outer rear quarter can come off and the new front half inner rear quarter welded in.

    Next will be fixing some rust in the very bottom of the drivers side cowl post, and replacing about an 18" square piece of the drivers floorboard. I've got an older Classic Enterprises panel for that so hopefully the stampings will match up.

    More as it happens.
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  35. #155
    President Member 62champ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Kentucky Bluegrass
    Posts
    3,296
    Paul - always enjoy seeing your progress - great way to document what you have done and is great encouragement for those of us who need a boost from time to time on what we are working on.

    As a side, my cousin Gary, back in 1995, bought back his high school/college car from the person he sold it to. It was parked in a field with some other parts cars in 1977 and had not moved until we put wheels/tires on it to pull it home.

    Gary, his brother, and my Uncle met me in South Bend for the May swap meet and show in 1996. He was blown away by the Studebaker museum's '64 hardtop. I had talked with the curator at the time and when I asked him a detail question about the car, he walked over, took down the rope and let Gary go over it with a fine toothed comb. I think he ended up taking two disposable cameras worth of photos about details on the car. Gary passed in 2010 and his son now owns and works on the car.

    Photo below is the day we pulled the car out of the field and started looking at what needed to be done. Worst rust was some pin-holes in the left front floor board (carpet/jute padding had been removed before it was parked) - every piece of interior was trashed - but that is what Texas does to anything like that which sits outside...


  36. #156
    President Member r1lark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
    Posts
    4,250
    Blog Entries
    36
    Thanks Patrick for the kind words. That Daytona you posted the pic of looks like a good project. A Texas car! To me, replacing interior is much easier than rust repair.

    Has Gary's son made progress on it?
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

  37. #157
    President Member 62champ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Kentucky Bluegrass
    Posts
    3,296
    I know it was painted a few years ago and the interior is done. I think it is mostly detail stuff. He drives it on a regular basis which is the most important part. He has five kids, so his time has its limits - but they all love grandpas Studebaker.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •