Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

In-Line Electric Fuel Pump

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fuel System: In-Line Electric Fuel Pump

    I have a '54 Land Cruiser, stock w/232 V-8.

    Anybody ever installed an in-line electric fuel pump? My car has one, installed by the previous owner. I'm guessing because the gas tank was so gummed up that the manual pump couldn't handle the load to pull the fuel up. I had the tank rebuilt and new lines. Now it seems like there's too much pressure coming up to the carb. I turn on the electric in-line pump prior to start and within seconds it's spewing fuel out the edges of the sight glass. I thought about removing the electric pump, going back to stock. But I live in Colorado and it gets hot in the summer and I thought the electric pump might help supplement the manual pump.

    Thoughts?

  • #2
    Install a pressure regulator just prior to the carburetor. They are inexpensive and easy to install. I keep mine set at 4 to 5 lbs.
    Others may have a better idea.

    Comment


    • #3
      The electric inline fuel pump is indeed a good idea to supplement the stock pump.
      Mine is on a manual operated switch out of site under dash.
      In hot weather after making a stop and shutting off the engine, fuel boils out of the carb and underhood lines.
      Turn on the electric pump, let it run till you hear it load up, engine starts immediately. Let the pump run for a minute or two to let cooler fuel reach the carb.
      I have tried turning off the pump as soon as the car is running and it will begin to stumble due to the hot fuel in the hot lines under the hood. Turn the pump on again and the stumbling stops.
      Also handy when you run out of gas, or if the stock pump gives up while on the road. Just make sure you don't pump fuel into the crankcase due to a ruptured pump diaphragm.
      There is information about 6 volt inline pumps here: http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/efuelpumps.html
      South Lompoc Studebaker

      Comment


      • #4
        I put a Carter on my 259 powered Lark, daily driver.
        #P60504
        It's an inline, simple connection, even comes with a filter. About 4psi with a large enough volume to feed the 259 in everything I've put it thru so far. Been on about a year+ with zero complaints. It's even VERY quiet while in the car. Even outside, you need to listen for it.

        Would recommend it to anyone with a stock / mostly stock Stude V-8 engine.

        Mike

        Comment


        • #5
          I would check the sediment bowl gasket first thing as it has probably shrunk to nothing. most electric fuel pumps will work as is but need a filter BEFORE the pump to strain out junk in tank. you have a bad gasket as bowl normally runs completely full. Luck Doofus

          Comment


          • #6
            Spewing fuel at the sight glass is from the gasket taking a vacation--replace it. The electric pump, as mentioned above, was more likely installed for "hot restart" and starting after sitting awhile, to take the load off the starter and fill the carb faster. It doesn't "suck" fuel very well, depends on gravity feed, so it wouldn't help any if the gas wasn't getting out of the tank from "gunk". If you cleaned it out, all the better, will prevent future problems, but I would add a filter in line from the tank to the pump as a precaution.

            Comment


            • #7
              Electric pumps are dangerous; unless you install a inline switch that turns off when the engine stops. A Switch activated by oil pressure and then the switch is bypassed in the start position or by a manual momentary contact switch.
              Ron

              Comment


              • #8
                I have always been curious as to why an oil pressure cut off switch would be thought of as a safety switch. During most collisions, that might sever the fuel line and cause a fire, the engine doesn't stop running, thus the pump keeps going. If safety is a primary worry then install an inertia switch, not only stops the pump, but also shuts the engine down if wired correctly.
                http://www.dealtrend.com/deals/elect...w4177/8139320/

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you use a momentary oil pressure switch the electric pump will only run until you build oil pressure (long enough to fill the carb) and then the mechanical fuel pump takes over. This is the best way to install an electric pump with no worry about pumping gas into the crankcase if the mehcanical diaphragm breaks (and keeps you from excessive cranking when starting with a dry carb).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I wasn't thinking about a collision but more of a broken fuel line spraying fuel all over the place. Be double safe; use both an oil pressure switch and a inertia switch. My 96 Ford Bronco has a inertia switch and the 95 Chevrolet diesel has a oil pressure switch. Both the way they came from the manufacture.
                    Ron

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      And they will never malfunction either,right? Just wire it to ign term to toggle switch to pump. That way you can use it incase of mechanical pump failure and for start-ups. Just like in aircraft.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have a 2 way switch on my Hawk, one side is momentary contact (you have to hold the switch on) the other throw is fixed (you don't have to hold it). I was told it is some kind of marine item, I have no more info on it, I found it at a swap meet. I also have a piece of gas line hose to bypass the mechanical pump, if it quits, to prevent filling the crankcase with gas.-Jim

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X