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Best way to clean differential (57 GHawk) without getting crud in from the tubes?

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  • #16
    A little confusing as to what has and hasn't been accomplished yet. But, if you need a case spreader you can make one yourself. Three pieces of steel (two notched to grip tool), four bolts (one set rounded and slightly tapered to grip the holes). A McPherson spring compressor (two threaded portions) and a short piece of pipe to hold the bolts on a common point. Doesn't take much but use a dial indicator. This was on my Dana 44 (Sunbeam Tiger) and their manual called for .007. Not sure what Studebaker recommends. Just don't mess up the shims!
    Attached Files
    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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    • #17
      Hi Barry- I was told imperatively by a Jaguar specialist that I should "use Petrol" (that's Gasoline where you fellers come from!) to flush out the Axle casing. Petrol will be bad enough but thinners might be just a bit too volatile. I think the suggestions made by others here are really helpful, particularly those about 'rodding and scraping' and particularly about keeping the pinion nose upmost. When I did mine I also went as far as using a spray bottle to spray solvent up into the gear case (axle supported horizontally with open side down) as a last flush to remove any abrasive left in bearings and walls etc. Any remnants are let to just flow out with the wash into a tray. I used this technique again recently to flush the engine after having the sump off for a while ( working outside with wind blowing some days- I couldn't help feeling some grit adhereing no matter what I did to protect it )
      Steve

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      • #18
        Ron, I have a 63 Avanti in the shop now. on it there was a small hole in the drivers side axle tube that was covered by a bracket that secured the brake line between the wheel cylinder and the junction block. The hole faced the rear and is mid level on the axle tube. Lou Cote

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        • #19
          Hi. Just wanted to add, that the vent hole was just as Lou said, under the brake line bracket on my 1960. mineral spirits should work, but if it were me, I would just get parts washing solvent at the parts store. The good stuff is still available here, and I use it in my parts washing sink. As for cleaning the tubes, you should be able to soak a rag with solvent, and pull it down the tube from the carrier end to the end of the axle with a piece of wire .

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          • #20
            Originally posted by dynolou2 View Post
            Ron, I have a 63 Avanti in the shop now. on it there was a small hole in the drivers side axle tube that was covered by a bracket that secured the brake line between the wheel cylinder and the junction block. The hole faced the rear and is mid level on the axle tube. Lou Cote
            Thanks, that's where I've been looking and prodding, but it sure is disguised with crud really well. At least I'm looking in the right place.
            Ron Dame
            '63 Champ

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            • #21
              I finally found that sucker, it was almost at the spring U bolt at about 4:00
              Ron Dame
              '63 Champ

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              • #22
                Assuming you have the rear end off the car, and you can wash out the tubes with a hose..........try Easy Off oven cleaner. It will get that crud out of the tubes. A toilet brush with a stick attached to it will help.
                John

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by dynolou2 View Post
                  Ron, I have a 63 Avanti in the shop now. on it there was a small hole in the drivers side axle tube that was covered by a bracket that secured the brake line between the wheel cylinder and the junction block. The hole faced the rear and is mid level on the axle tube. Lou Cote
                  That is amazing considering those holes appeared up to 1957?

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Hawklover View Post

                    That is amazing considering those holes appeared up to 1957?
                    Not sure I understand...............are you trying to say that the very small vent hole in the Dana axles were not there after 1957? If so, I'll have to disagree with that, since all my Studebakers (various years up to 1964) have these vent holes.

                    As Lou mentions above, the hole usually has the big circular brake line clip covering it.
                    Last edited by r1lark; 04-02-2021, 06:16 PM.
                    Paul
                    Winston-Salem, NC
                    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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                    • #25
                      LOL I mean the hole where the zerk went in for lubing purposes (rear bearings)

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                      • #26
                        Sam, (Hawklover), the Zerk Greasing Hole and it's Vent Hole were not being discussed here as you found out, but they were not supposed to be on 1957 on & Later Cars, but obviously there were some Early '57's that used the remainder of the Stock.
                        StudeRich
                        Second Generation Stude Driver,
                        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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