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SBC Engine and trans into 2R16A

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  • Mrs K Corbin
    replied
    I'm not sure about the mode of failure, as i didn't do any sort of analysis. Just tossed them and got new. They were sleeved in stainless and brazed in, I do know that.
    They were NOT White Post if that helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • RadioRoy
    replied
    Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
    For the good of the order, what was the failure mode of your sleeved cylinder? Reason for asking is I've successfully used several, both brass and stainless, and want to watch for potential problems.

    jack vines
    I had several sets sleeved with stainless back in the late 80's. They leaked, rear wheel locked, and almost threw me and my little 51 Champion over the side of a mountain in the gold country. If I ever come face to face with a certain George F, from New England, I will tell him all about it. As far as I can tell, the sleeves were inserted without any Loctite or other sealant. The brake fluid leaked under pressure between the sleeve and the casting.

    After that, I had White Post do several cylinders in brass. Since that car sits in the garage a lot, those cylinders are now sticking and have to be replaced. Probably my fault for not using them often enough.
    Last edited by RadioRoy; 02-18-2019, 10:48 AM.

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  • Lynn
    replied
    Well, I would love to replace them. Would be much quicker too.

    Anyone have a source for front wheel cylinders for a 1949 2R16A?

    Tried to find some 6 years ago, but never did. IIRC, they each had different bore sizes front and rear, like 1.25 and 1 inch?
    I see wheel cylinders listed on ebay, but they are not staggered bore sizes, so I know they are not correct.

    Right now, I have no e-brake. I cleaned up the drum on back of the tranny, and had the band re -lined, but still need to fab a bracket assembly for the handle.

    I, too, would be interested in hearing how the sleeved wheel cylinders failed.

    Anyone have any experience with White Post for sleeving?

    Leave a comment:


  • PackardV8
    replied
    Originally posted by Mrs K Corbin View Post
    Replace if you can, DO NOT sleeve them. Maybe they can be bored oversized?
    I had a sleeved set fail within one mile of the Museum.
    For the good of the order, what was the failure mode of your sleeved cylinder? Reason for asking is I've successfully used several, both brass and stainless, and want to watch for potential problems.

    jack vines

    Leave a comment:


  • Mrs K Corbin
    replied
    Replace if you can, DO NOT sleeve them. Maybe they can be bored oversized?
    I had a sleeved set fail within one mile of the Museum. Almost lost the truck.
    Quick question: where is your emergency brake, and does it work? Mine was on the rear brakes, and when the sleeves failed, it soaked the rear linings.
    I lost all fluid, plus the emergency brake. Did you know that you can DRIFT (Power Slide) a 2R5? I found out the hard way.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lynn
    replied
    Thought I would update this thread. And yes, I know: THIS THREAD IS WORTHLESS WITHOUT PICS". No pics today, but will post some when I get a chance.

    Was able to get everything going excpet the PTO set up for the dump bed. The PTO that came on my Chevy trans (New Process five speed) was on the driver's side. The Studebaker four speed had it on the passenger side.

    The New Process has provisions to install a PTO on either side, but I could never get a definitive answer on which unit I needed. Got one cheap enough from another Chevy trans, but the gears were cut at different angle than the gear in the trans. So, just put block off plates where both of the PTOs were, and decided to deal with it later. Now, it appears it is later.

    Converted to using an electric over hydraulic pump set up. Got the idea from a member on this site that was selling his car hauler with the same type set up.

    I was able to mount the unit in the exact same spot as the old pump and reservoir were mounted. Even used some of the existing bracketry.

    Bought this unit listed on ebay: https://www.ebay.com/itm/401622716234?ul_noapp=true

    Beware of two things:
    1. The unit I recieved is not exactly the same as the one pictured. The instruction manual was for the one pictured, and the wiring is not all in the same place. Was able to figure it out, but the instruction manual is pathetic. Blurry pics of the wiring. Has an instruction to make sure you use the "proper" gauge of wire, but NOWHERE in the manual does it say what the "proper" size is. I went over board and used 2AWG battery cables, running the hot side through a 200 amp circuit breaker. I can manually trip the breaker if I want to. I probably want to, as I have twin 6 year old grandsons that like to push buttons and "help" me at the shop. That way, if one of them pushes the "UP" button in the cab, I don't have to worry about it.

    2. The hydraulic fitting that comes in this unit is not a standard size for anything hydraulic. I took the fitting and my old hose to the largest hydraulic repair and fab shop in OKC, and they had never seen a fitting like it. I ended up having to cut it in half, cut another fitting in half, and weld the two together to get my new hose to fit.

    Good news is the pump is quiet and smooth and quickly raises the bed. Maybe even a little faster than the PTO did.

    I do have a leak in the ram at full lift, but will wait for warmer weather before removing the ram and replacing the seals.

    One other issue to deal with. Since the truck has sat in my warehouse most of the winter, I lost the brakes. Crap. Leaking front wheel cylinders. I rebuilt them about 6 years ago. They were slightly pitted. I honed them the best I could, but guess that wasn't good enough. Plan to send the wheel cylinders out to be sleeved. Again, will probably wait for warmer weather.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lynn
    replied
    Put about 100 miles on it over the weekend. Picked up a dresser from our 25 year old. Went by two of my brother's homes, and Mom's. Went out to eat, and even drove home in the dark. I realize my old 6 volt headlights may have been due for a change, but I will tell you, it was a joy driving it at night, and I never could drive at night with the 6 volt headlights. And one was new.

    Cruises down the interstate at 65. Of course, it is turning 4000 rpm. I am hoping to find a mid 90's 3500HD rear axle assy with wheels and tires. Most have either a 4.10 or a 4.63 rear gear. Either one would beat this 6.66 rear. I can see why Studebaker used it with the 90 hp flat head six, but with this torque monster 350, there is no need for such a short gear in the rear. It is already more useable now than it was. It will be a dream to drive with a taller gear.

    Anyway, sorry for the crappy pic; it is one my brother took with his phone and emaile to us.

    I know I have mentioned it before, but I have AN ANGEL for a wife. Not just because she loves the old cars, but she helps me with all my hair brained projects (we are putting Corvette/Chevy Truck hybrid brakes on my 68 El Camino) and she ALWAYS thinks of everyone in the family before herself. I am the luckiest man alive.

    That's Sherri with me in front of my brother's house. Can't wait to re-upholster the seat and add some lumbar supports.Click image for larger version

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    Just looked at the picture. Lord, I am getting fat. Time to go on a diet.

    At least I still have my vision. Went to the eye doctor today for the second time since 1975 (at Sherri's insistence). Still test 20/15 at distance. Not bad for age 64. And no, I don't color my hair. Wash it with a bar of Zest, and dry it with a towel.
    Of course, like most of you guys, I have to wear the darn readers for up close stuff.

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  • r1lark
    replied
    Thanks for the update Lynn! Good to hear it's running well. Post some more pics!

    Leave a comment:


  • Lynn
    replied
    Drove the truck quite a bit over the weekend. It is really fun and pulls like a tractor. I used a Crane roller cam made for low rpm high torque applications. this one: http://www.cranecams.com/product/car...detail&p=23901

    Had Sherri follow me on the highway to pace the speedo. Expected it to be close because the truck this trans and speedo drive came from had a 6.50 rear with slightly taller tires than my 6.66 rear with 235 80R 17 Michelin tires.

    Dead on at 62 mph. BTW, this speedo was inoperative before. I disassembled partially and lubed it up and she is working perfectly. Has a little cap on top that I will lube each oil change.

    Hoping some time in the next year or two to find a mid 90's 3500HD with a bad engine or bad engine and trans. They normally have a 4.10 or 4.63 Dana 80 rear end with 13 inch drum brakes. I would be happy with either of those. Plus, it would have shocks and shock mounts. My truck has no shocks on the rear, and never did. It was an option!!!!

    Need to bleed the brakes one more time as I haven't bled them since installing the new MC, which was only bench bled. Plan to pull the front shocks and go through them to make sure they are OK. After that, I think I am done with mechanical things on this other than pulling the heater core and having it rebuilt.

    Having driven this one with the flat head 6, I can say for certain, I don't regret this swap one bit. Had a lot of fun, and made a very useful truck out of this. After I finish my next big project, I may even turn it into a car hauler.

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  • Lynn
    replied
    Thanks Roy. I have used the horn multiple times and it seems fine. No warm wires or any other indication of an issue.

    I almost used the Evans waterless coolant in this build, mainly because of the heater core. You can run it at zero pressure; in fact that is what is recommended.
    Anyway, heater core looks to be an easy R&R, so it will probably come out this week and go to the radiator shop next week just for insurance.

    Leave a comment:


  • RadioRoy
    replied
    Heater core maximum pressure is a good question for the radiator shop. From experience, I know the 7 pounds would be OK, but 15 might leave you stranded somewhere when/if the heater core finally goes. The radiator shop guys should know, if you tell them that it came from a zero pound original system.

    You might want to test the horn first to see if the 12-6 volt reducer has the chops to handle it without letting out the magic smoke.

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  • Lynn
    replied
    Don't know about YouTube. Maybe one of the kids will make a short and post it.

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  • Mrs K Corbin
    replied
    soooooooo Where's the YouTube drive report? LOL

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  • Lynn
    replied
    Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
    I was going to comment on 15 pounds into the heater core, but you already addressed that.

    I would not run the horns on the 12-6 volt converter. Horns take a lot of current. You could isolate the ground on one of the horns and run the two of them in series.
    Mine only has one horn. I don't plan to lay on it often anyway. So, limited ues, and half the current of two horns, I think I am fine.

    I am going to pull the heater core and have my radiator guy go through it. I have it bypassed right now. It's pushing 80 degrees here this week, so may wait until late summer early fall to address that.

    Roy: from your comment, I am guessing you would not try 15 psi to the heater core?

    I can look for a 7 lb cap.

    On another note, I did not have to put gaskets in the left side exhaust manifold. I had never tightened the bolts! Doh!

    Leave a comment:


  • RadioRoy
    replied
    I was going to comment on 15 pounds into the heater core, but you already addressed that.

    I would not run the horns on the 12-6 volt converter. Horns take a lot of current. You could isolate the ground on one of the horns and run the two of them in series.

    Leave a comment:

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