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SBC Engine and trans into 2R16A

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Lynn View Post
    Had to have the gas tank re-configured because of the enormity of the Chev truck 5 speed. It is ready to be picked up.

    I have decided to go with a bigger modern radiator, so will be selling my original, which was just cleaned and rodded last year.

    Can anyone confirm that the 2R5 radiators have the same bolt pattern as my 2R16A? I am guessing that they are the same, as the cab is the same, and I beleive the radiator support is the same. There are vendors with radiators made specifically for 49 - 52 C cab pickups such as this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/151546810362...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

    Would like to use a shelf unit, if possible.

    Thanks in advance for any help.
    Dunno if you got an answer to this and your other question. All 2R, 3R, and E-series trucks used the same radiator support, so the mounting holes should be the same. It got bigger in 1956. There were several different radiators used in the 2R trucks, but the same standard-duty unit was used in all 2R6 through 2R16 models. However, there was also a HD version -- so you could have either. Trucks with Champion engines normally got a smaller unit with wider mounting ears. If buying an aftermarket unit, make sure it's not one intended for use with the Champion engine.
    Skip Lackie

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    • #47
      Thanks Skip. No I did not get a direct answer to the size question. But, I assumed they were all the same based on this ad: http://www.ebay.com/itm/191986985047...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

      Pretty hard to beat at $200 and free shipping. I paid more than that to bring this one up to 100%.
      That aluminum radiator is supposed to cool a V8 engine without issue.

      My truck had the big six (245) and I can see three rows of tubes in the radiator, so I am guessing it is the hd cooling radiator.

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      • #48
        If/when you decide to sell the old radiator, drop me a PM or post a price.
        Skip Lackie

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        • #49
          Skip, were you asking me about the radiator I have that I plan to sell or someone else that posted here??

          Thanks,
          Treblig

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          • #50
            I am going to try my original radiator first. It has a larger core than the aftermarket one, and both are 3 row cores.

            If I do decide to sell it, I will let you know.

            Lynn

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Treblig View Post
              Skip, were you asking me about the radiator I have that I plan to sell or someone else that posted here??

              Thanks,
              Treblig
              Thanks. That question was addressed to Lynn. I have a 3R6, and having a spare OEM radiator appeals to me.
              Skip Lackie

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Lynn View Post
                I am going to try my original radiator first. It has a larger core than the aftermarket one, and both are 3 row cores.

                If I do decide to sell it, I will let you know.

                Lynn
                I suspect that your original radiator may turn out to be marginal with the SBC. Studebaker had to modify the radiator support to accommodate larger radiators when they began to install the 289 in 1956. And they went to even bigger radiators when they added the 2-ton HD model 3E40.
                Skip Lackie

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                • #53
                  PM sent to you Skip.

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                  • #54
                    Gas Tank install

                    Haven’t posted pics in a while.
                    Got the gas tank back today. Had the “hump” shortened 4 inches, which moved the filler neck 4 inches forward, allowing me to mount the tank 4 inches farther back than stock. I think would have been enough, but there was definitely room to go 4.

                    Measured 4 inches from the stock mounting bolts; drilled four new holes and she mounted up fine. Used all the factory mounting hardware. Even the wires for the sender (which still works) were long enough to reach.

                    Here are pics of the tank after modification.
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                    Pic installed looking from outside the truck.

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                    Pics of the tank from underneath.
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                    Pick of the filler neck, and another showing that I can still access the sender from in the cab without having to pull the tank. The neck came up right in the middle of the hole. I love it when a plan comes together.
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                    Finally, a pic of the drum park brake and the stubbed drive shaft yoke on the trans. Plenty of room now.

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                    Now have to install the driveshaft pieces and measure for a front driveshaft Studebaker/Chevy hybrid.

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                    • #55
                      Motor mounts

                      Forgot about my lucky parts book find. I had posted on another web site (yenko.net) where I know a lot of guys that have old GM parts books. If you look at my very first post in this thread I was bemoaning the fact that none of the sources for parts have any books for the "medium duty" GM trucks from 1972 era.

                      Anyway, I received a PM from a guy who said he had what I needed. Offered to mail it, and if I approved of it we could work a deal. I give him my address, and next messaage I get he says he mailed it to me, and not to worry about paying for it.

                      Turns out several years ago he was desparate for a pair of brackets for rear sway bar mounts on his 1970 Yenko Duece (if you don't know what a Yenko Duece is, you ought to look it up). Anyway, the brackets are virtually impossible to find, and are not reproduced. Only the Dueces and a few others got the F41 suspension in 1970. Most guys that need them end up either fabbbing a pair or cutting them off a donor car. Because they are welded on to the subframe, they seldom can be removed cleanly enough to be usable. Long story short (too late for that) I had a pair of NOS brackets that still had the GM part numbers on them. I had purchased them in 1976 thinking I was going to adapt them on my 69 Z/28 and add a rear sway bar. When I restored the car, I couldn't bring myself to weld on the subframe. After all the car only had 26,000 miles at that time (has a bit over 28k now) so I wanted to stay factory original, and passed on the welding plan. I sold him the brackets at about 10% of market value. I like to see rare cars restored correctly, and wasn't looking to make a killing. I didn't even remember his name, or his screen name. He so appreciated my kindness years ago, that he sent me the parts book for free.

                      It is over 1000 pages, and covers EVERY part on every Chevy medium duty truck (1.5 ton to 2.5 ton... 40 50 60 series) from 1946 to 1972. So, first night I had it I am combing through looking for part numbers for little stuff I needed. Entered part numbers in ebay and got everything in one night, including new rear motor mounts, top and bottom.

                      Pic of LH side mount. NOS.
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                      Last edited by Lynn; 11-23-2016, 07:52 PM.

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                      • #56
                        Nice work on the gas tank. I would never have attempted something that had to fit that precisely. I have seen a couple of UNMODIFIED C-cab trucks where the sender hole in the factory tank doesn't line up very well with the hole in the cab floor. Assume you will be using the Chevy power steering unit in your truck. Stude hung the Hydrovac unit on their big trucks right behind the gas tank (with the vacuum tank right behind that), which would make moving the gas tank rearward a bigger challenge.

                        BTW, I have a fairly extensive collection of Chevy parts books, and probably have a copy of that 46-72 medium-duty truck book in my stash. Not that you will need that one, but would be glad to loan any of them out should you need something else. The gods are smiling at you if you found everything you needed in that Chevy parts book. I have found them to be much more difficult to use than the Stude books for a number of reasons: (1) Illustrations are "typical" and rarely match the vehicle I'm working on; (2) Discontinued parts are not listed at all; (3) Fasteners are listed in a separate book and are rarely associated with their use; and (4) The sheer number and variety of vehicles and drive train and trim combinations the books cover greatly complicates the listings to the point that something simple (a light switch) requires four pages of text. (Number (4) is not their fault, of course, but a result of GM's size and the wide array of vehicles they offered. But I do fault them for the other three items.) The Stude parts books are much better laid out and illustrated.
                        Skip Lackie

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                        • #57
                          Thanks for the offer Skip. I agree 100% on the parts book. Unbelievably complex. Discontinued parts are not an issue in this case, as the book covers 1972 parts, and was printed in 1979. One of my parts had been superceded (I got the old number out of this book), and I was able to cross it over to the new number with an internet search. Takes some patience, but eventually, I found the right numbers.

                          Staying with manual steering. With the modern Michelin radials, it really isn't that hard to steer, expecially with the giant steering wheel. Easier than my 69 Z/28 with the quick steering arms and no power. I had a later model box from a WS-6 Firebird on the Z and will probably put it back on. Simple bolt on that doesn't hurt the originilaity of the car.

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                          • #58
                            Getting close to firing this thing up. Got the drive shaft shortened. $72 and that included a new U-joint. They were able to use the front yoke on the studebaker driveshaft and the output flange from the Chevy. There is a production U joint that is two sizes (one cross shaft is longer than the other) to make it work.

                            Had to drill one hole in the firewall to put carb linkage through. Built a little relay system and drilled two holes in the floor to mount it. Did not have to change the location of my gas pedal. The linkage "pushes" where most Chevy carbs "pull". I just removed the little fitting for the old Powerglide kickdown lever and hooked the linkage up to that. Got the carb rebuilt last night.

                            Have the aluminum radiator fitted. Had to adapt it way down and over to the passenger side just a bit to get the lower hose fitting to clear the fan. I am sure they call it a "bolt in" because almost everyone uses an electric fan, but I didn't want to to that. Would have had to upgrade from the standard alternator that I already had. It is fine other than the mud dobber nest inside. Took it apart and checked it out, and all is good.

                            Also, on the radiator, because it is so low, there is a huge gap from the top of the radiator to the top of the support. I am filling that gap with a sheet of aluminum (actually an old Police station sign that was here when we moved in... I like to repurpose things). Used another piece of the same sign to make a filler plate for the driver's side of the radiator (big gap after moving it to the passenger side 3 inches). I am using a stainless steel flex fan (free... stole it off my 68 El Camino and installed a proper clutch fan as God intended... already had the blade, just had to buy a new fan clutch for $17). Ordered a spacer for the fan that will put it about 1/2 inch from the radiator. My hope is, that with the fan that close, I won't need to build a shroud.

                            Got the alterntor mounted with the old Chevy truck mounting system. Had to change lower pulley because the giant 4 groove pulley that came on the Chevy interfered with the flex fan. Fortunately, the lower pulley is nasyt looking ,but will be barely visible once its all together. I just happened to have a belt the right size. I am either living right, or have worked on way to many projects.
                            Will post some pics this week.

                            Relocating the battery to the passenger side frame just behind the cab. Didn't feel like building a box, so bought this one on ebay: http://www.ebay.com/itm/261865981047...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT Got it installed tonight, along with a good 00 negative cable to ground. Also put two heavy duty ground cables between the engine and fram. I KNOW this is supposed to be positive ground, but it was already operating as negative ground before I got it. Only thing that didn't work right is the ammeter... it read backwards. Hoping I can switch wires and fix that. Because I am running HEI, I need to switch to 12 volt. I have an adapter to step down to 6 volts for the coil. Will my horn handle 12 volts? Or do I need to step it down as well?

                            The battery tray doesn't exactly fit the character of this build which I consider a bit of a hack build, as I haven't worried about making things especially pretty, just functional.

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                            • #59
                              Re radiator shroud: Am surprised the 2R16 didn't already have a shroud. Anyway, if it turns out you need a shroud, there should be plenty of used ones around. Many Stude trucks came with two-piece shrouds, with notches for the lower radiator hose in a variety of locations.
                              Skip Lackie

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                              • #60
                                Waiting on that first drive report!

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