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  • #31
    Clutch linkage

    This is difficult to explain, even with pictures. Hard to explain what was (no “before” pics) and what I ended up with.
    I have all the clutch linkage worked out. I re-used the original operating shaft assembly, albeit cut into pieces. I really like the Studebaker operating shaft / release shaft set up. There was just no way to use it on this Chevy bell housing. There was a shaft operated clutch bell housing used back in the 70’s or 80’s by Chevrolet and GMC, but the ones I found for sale were very expensive. McLeod sells one for racers, but even more expensive. And, the chance that I could have gotten everything to line up was slim at best. So, built a two bell crank solution that hopefully works well.

    The original shaft and bushings were in great shape. No discernable wear on the part of the shaft that goes to a bushing on the frame. Cleaned it up and lubed it. I cut the end of the shaft off, and welded it to a 9/16 bolt that threads in to the Chevy bell housing where the bell crank stud was originally (on the Chevy). That way I get the exact same location for my engine side bell crank. I cut down the Chevy bell crank assembly. It is exactly on inch inside diameter on the engine side. I placed two bronze bushings in it with one inch OD and ¾ inch ID. The Stud operating shaft is ¾ inch so it is a tight fit with no slop. The end of the shaft already had a hole in it, so a ¾ inch washer and cotter key keeps everything in place.
    For the engine mounted bell crank, I cut a 1.25 inch hole in a bracket, and welded it to the tube and the other bracket (probably overkill, but I am using a massive 13 inch clutch, so this bracket will take a lot of force). Her are pics of the bell crank stud and the engine side bell crank. I drilled extra holes in case my geometry is off a bit, and I need more travel or more leverage.
    Click image for larger version

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    Back to the frame mounted bell crank. As stated, the shaft is exactly ¾ inch. I drilled a ¾ inch hole in a ¼ thick piece of steel to weld on the end (after cutting off part of the shaft). I used another ¾ bronze bushing mounted in another ¼ inch pieces of steel with a one inch hole and used a ¾ inch collar to space it to where I wanted. The mounting steel is bolted to the MC/Clutch stabilizing bracket to keep everything in place.

    Click image for larger version

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    Here it is in place on the frame. All lubed up and ready to go. Also, a pic of the area where it mounts (with nothing there). Again, multiple holes so I can correct any geometry issues. Hardest part was getting the return spring hooked on the other side of my home made cross member mount. Everything is tight here, because the new bell housing dwarf’s the old one (going from a 10.75 inch clutch to a 13 inch clutch).

    Click image for larger version

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    And here we are with it all hooked up. The “hanging” heim joint will support the rod that goes to the clutch release fork. It is in the exact same position it was in when this engine / trans was in the Chevy, so I know it lines up. I built an adjustable rod using DOM tubing, 5/8 od and 3/8 id with nuts welded to each end.

    Click image for larger version

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    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by Lynn View Post
      This is difficult to explain, even with pictures. Hard to explain what was (no “before” pics) and what I ended up with.
      I have all the clutch linkage worked out. I re-used the original operating shaft assembly, albeit cut into pieces. I really like the Studebaker operating shaft / release shaft set up. There was just no way to use it on this Chevy bell housing. There was a shaft operated clutch bell housing used back in the 70’s or 80’s by Chevrolet and GMC, but the ones I found for sale were very expensive. McLeod sells one for racers, but even more expensive. And, the chance that I could have gotten everything to line up was slim at best. So, built a two bell crank solution that hopefully works well.

      The original shaft and bushings were in great shape. No discernable wear on the part of the shaft that goes to a bushing on the frame. Cleaned it up and lubed it. I cut the end of the shaft off, and welded it to a 9/16 bolt that threads in to the Chevy bell housing where the bell crank stud was originally (on the Chevy). That way I get the exact same location for my engine side bell crank. I cut down the Chevy bell crank assembly. It is exactly on inch inside diameter on the engine side. I placed two bronze bushings in it with one inch OD and ¾ inch ID. The Stud operating shaft is ¾ inch so it is a tight fit with no slop. The end of the shaft already had a hole in it, so a ¾ inch washer and cotter key keeps everything in place.
      For the engine mounted bell crank, I cut a 1.25 inch hole in a bracket, and welded it to the tube and the other bracket (probably overkill, but I am using a massive 13 inch clutch, so this bracket will take a lot of force). Her are pics of the bell crank stud and the engine side bell crank. I drilled extra holes in case my geometry is off a bit, and I need more travel or more leverage.
      [ATTACH=CONFIG]58695[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]58696[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]58697[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]58698[/ATTACH]


      Back to the frame mounted bell crank. As stated, the shaft is exactly ¾ inch. I drilled a ¾ inch hole in a ¼ thick piece of steel to weld on the end (after cutting off part of the shaft). I used another ¾ bronze bushing mounted in another ¼ inch pieces of steel with a one inch hole and used a ¾ inch collar to space it to where I wanted. The mounting steel is bolted to the MC/Clutch stabilizing bracket to keep everything in place.

      [ATTACH=CONFIG]58699[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]58700[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]58701[/ATTACH]

      Here it is in place on the frame. All lubed up and ready to go. Also, a pic of the area where it mounts (with nothing there). Again, multiple holes so I can correct any geometry issues. Hardest part was getting the return spring hooked on the other side of my home made cross member mount. Everything is tight here, because the new bell housing dwarf’s the old one (going from a 10.75 inch clutch to a 13 inch clutch).

      [ATTACH=CONFIG]58702[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]58703[/ATTACH]

      And here we are with it all hooked up. The “hanging” heim joint will support the rod that goes to the clutch release fork. It is in the exact same position it was in when this engine / trans was in the Chevy, so I know it lines up. I built an adjustable rod using DOM tubing, 5/8 od and 3/8 id with nuts welded to each end.

      [ATTACH=CONFIG]58704[/ATTACH]


      That's pretty cool!! Looks a lot like something I would do. I find that it's more fun to figure things out for myself than it is to simply "buy" my way out of it. It takes time, but in the end it's very satisfying.

      treblig

      Comment


      • #33
        Yeah, Gil, I came very close to buying everything needed for hydraulic. Anyway, hope I am close on the geometry.

        BTW, when you said: "Looks a lot like something I would do." , I took that as quite a compliment.

        Hope you are back up and going full steam ahead soon on your daughter's Hawk.

        Comment


        • #34
          Haven't posted in a while. Been getting the engine together. Settled on exhaust manifolds that won't interfere with anything. Need to sandblast and coat the passenger side manifold.
          Decided to paint the engine flat black and adapt some Studebaker Thunderbold decals on top. Hey Studebaker did use Chevy engines at the end.

          Running an HEI and had to run all the plug wires under the manifolds because of the style I was using.

          Also had to weld on an adaptor so I could use a universal dipstick in the side of the pan. The drivers side manifold clears the steering box, but interferes with the block mounted dipstick tube. I threaded the hole, and plugged it with a pipe plug.

          Can't decided if I am leaving an oil fill tube on the front of the manifold. I don't need it, as there are fill plugs in each valve cover. But, it would be easier to fill at the front, and be less likely to spill. If I decided to keep it, I will paint it black as well.

          I was excited to learn that my temp sensor would reach on the passenger side, and I could still hook up an IDIOT light on the driver's side. Then I realized I did not keep the little adapter that the sensor screws into on the old flathead. Or, at least I haven't run across it yet. The guy I gave the engine to is just walking distance from our house, so I can check with him tomorrow.

          Click image for larger version

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          • #35
            Got the GIANT NP542 trans cleaned up and resealed. I normally work on manual transmissions on the bench. This one is so heavy, I had to lift it with the hoist and mount it to the bell housing that is bolted to an engine stand.

            It needed a new front bearing retainer, and believe it or not, I found an NOS one very reasonable. Purchased a complete gasket and seal kit. I was shocked to find NO GASKET on the shift tower. Removed the driver's side PTO, as it would interfere with the gas tank, & I really don't want to relocate the gas tank, although, it could be done without too much trouble. I am hoping to find the correct passenger side PTO for this trans. For now, I am just covering both PTO holes with plates.

            It came equiped to mount one on either side. Strangly, the driver's side meshes with a straigth cut gear, and the passenger side meshes with a beveled gear. That means there is no chance the old PTO off the Studebaker trans would work. All the gears in that trans are straight cut, including the PTO. If I cannot get the right PTO set up, I can run the dump bed from the PS pump. I got a good pump set up for a remote reservoir with this truck engine and trans. Still, I would have to plumb the thing and get the correct valves to run the dump bed. I would RATHER just hook up another PTO.

            I am at least going to investigate whether I can make the Studebaker park brake set up work on this transmission. Plenty of places to bolt things. Just depends on whether I can get the drum machined to fit this output shaft. I am pretty sure I can fab some brackets to hold the band in place and mount the lever so that it comes up in the same place it did on the old trans.Click image for larger version

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            Last edited by Lynn; 12-11-2016, 08:41 AM. Reason: spelling

            Comment


            • #36
              Got two pieces of good news today. Found the adapter for the temp probe, so I can use my original mechanical gauge.

              Also, the New Process Trans does not have a park brake assembly on it. May have had one at one time. The drum on my Studebaker trans had a 3 inch hole to center on the output flange. The flange on the New Process needed a 3.75 inch hole and new holes for the studs. I will post pics of the two output flanges side by side when I get a chance. Anyway stopped by a good buddy's shop today to see if he could machine the holes I needed. No problem. Had it done before I was ready to head home. Perfect fit. Now I need to fab up brackets to hold the band and the activation mechanism.

              Pics to come.

              Comment


              • #37
                Love the problem solving, keep posting. Bob

                Comment


                • #38
                  Well, I won't be posting any fab work for the park brake. Buddy took me to an place five blocks from my office that I didn't even know existed. Tons of old trucks and truck parts. The owner is a super nice guy. I started out looking just for a passenger side PTO to fit my NP542 trans. They guy had about a dozen old NP transmissions sitting out in the yard. One has a PTO and it has the 9.5 inch park brake drum and all the bracketry for it. I also needed a new speedo drive. I bought EVERYTHING from the shifter back for $50. I get to go back and pull it all myself tomorrow or Fri. Part of the backet bolts on the side, and part is integral with the rear seal holder. Sweet deal.
                  Last edited by Lynn; 10-20-2016, 07:37 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Well, I was wrong again.
                    The tranny I got the park brake assy off of was apparently designed for a 9.5 inch drum and mine is designed for a 10 inch drum. I coulnd't use the anchor bracket for the park brake drum and had to fab one.
                    I brought home the rear bearing retainer from the yard which would have worked to hold my mechanism (adjusting link & inner and outer cams) in place. But, believe it or not, between Wed. when I went to look at it and Thurs when I went to get parts off, they moved all the transmissions, and broke the end off that would have held all that together. It was aluminum, so not all that strong anyway. The real holding power is from the bracket on the driver's side. So, I cut the one off the bearing retainer on the Studebaker trans (at least it is iron) and welded it to some scrap steel with holes punched for mounting.

                    Will try to post pics tonight. Worked on it until 11 last night and need to go down and clean up my mess. We did get the engine and trans assembly in the truck (hopefully for the last time). I got the clutch linkage hooked up and it is nice and smooth. So... as Carl the greenskeeper would say: "So, I got that going for me".

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Problem Solving

                      As with most engine tranny swaps (other than direct bolt in stuff) there are always challenges and, as Bob said, problem solving.

                      Here are comparisons of the old and new park brake drums and output flanges. You can see the new is much heavier duty.

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                      As stated above, thought I had a sweet deal all ready to go. I got the park brake parts from a New Process trans, but apparently not the same model as mine. They made about a 100 different units. The brake drum I brought home is 9.5. The old Studebaker drum is 8, so nice upgrade. I had already had the Studebaker brake drum machined for the NP output flange and was ready to bolt it up and fab brackets. Put the 9.5 drum on in anticipation of a bolt on with the new drivers side locating bracket.


                      As you can see in the pic, my old bracket was broken. New one is fine. But…. apparently my transmission (NP542L) came with a 10 inch drum. I am guessing that the bosses where the bracket bolts on the driver’s side were machined down ¼ inch more on the units that got a 9.5 inch drum. I had already cleaned up and resealed the trans and didn’t want to grind away on it.
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                      That meant I missed it by, as Maxwell Smart would say “by that much”. The tape measure said ¼ inch. I had to fab a bracket to locate the band ¼ inch farther in. See pics. The driver’s side bracket takes all the abuse, and must be strong enough to hold the truck by the band. The passenger side bracketry simply locates the pin and provides a place for the actuator to squeeze the band.

                      New bracketry: Click image for larger version

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                      I ended up cutting the steel bracket that was integrated on the Studebaker rear bearing retainer and welding it on the broken bracket from the driver’s side. Happy to say it all lined up well and looks like it will work. I CAN (if I have to) make an adapter bracket for the Studebaker park brake handle assemble to work, but am hoping I can go back to the parts truck and find the Chevy handle assembly. No big deal either way.


                      One more surprise, and I am hoping this is the last surprise. The transmission is so much bigger, and with the 9.5 inch park brake, I can’t get the gas tank in the same position it was in. I had planned to have the tank cleaned up anyway, so when I took it to the radiator shop this morning, I explained to my radiator guy (2nd gen guy in a dying art, a real craftsman) what my problem was. He is going to shorten the “hump area by 3 inches, relocate the filler neck and I can mount the whole gas tank back 3 inches from where it was. Its always something. If I had anticipated this, I could have located the entire engine trans assy about 2 inches forward, and avoided this. But, I think I am better with it back where it is for two reasons. 1. My shifter is in almost the exact location it was before. It is ¾ inch to the right by design to allow clearance for the left exhaust manifold. 2. If I was two inches farther forward, no way I could use the same manifold. Perhaps I would find another, but who knows. The cost of modifying the tank is not much more than having it cleaned out properly anyway.

                      With help from my ANGEL of a wife, we got the engine and trans bolted together and placed in the truck. All the motor mounts are bolted up snug. No pics yet, but will take some soon. Have about 1/8 inch clearance on the driver's side exhaust manifold, and as stated above, the shifter location is perfect. My fabricated clutch linkage works very smoothly with minimal effort. Just details from here. Hard part is all done.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Had to have the gas tank re-configured because of the enormity of the Chev truck 5 speed. It is ready to be picked up.

                        I have decided to go with a bigger modern radiator, so will be selling my original, which was just cleaned and rodded last year.

                        Can anyone confirm that the 2R5 radiators have the same bolt pattern as my 2R16A? I am guessing that they are the same, as the cab is the same, and I beleive the radiator support is the same. There are vendors with radiators made specifically for 49 - 52 C cab pickups such as this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/151546810362...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

                        Would like to use a shelf unit, if possible.

                        Thanks in advance for any help.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          I ordered a 1 1/4" tube aluminum radiator from Wizard Cooling. They made it to fit perfectly in my daughter's 59 Silver Hawk. I don't now how or where they got the dimensions but it was an exact replacement except for being aluminum and GREATLY reducing/eliminating my engine heat problem. It is a little thicker (front to back) but it really cools!! It was $650 or so but well worth it since it should last 20 years. My daughter's car has a brand new Chevy 350 engine, AC, P/S, PB.

                          treblig

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Gil:

                            How many rows did your factory radiator have.

                            Mine has 3 rows and is in very good shape. Wondering if it is extra heavy duty being a 2 ton truck.

                            May just go ahead and try it before shelling out $$$ for a new one.

                            Could always sell this one to someone with a stock pick up. I doubt the 1/2 tons got this much cooling capacity, so would be a good upgrade.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Lynn View Post
                              Gil:

                              How many rows did your factory radiator have.

                              Mine has 3 rows and is in very good shape. Wondering if it is extra heavy duty being a 2 ton truck.

                              May just go ahead and try it before shelling out $$$ for a new one.

                              Could always sell this one to someone with a stock pick up. I doubt the 1/2 tons got this much cooling capacity, so would be a good upgrade.
                              My old one was 2 core (259 engine). I guess I need to put it up for sale because it worked perfect with the original engine. The one big difference with the aluminum radiator (besides the 1 1/4" tubes) is that it had a much larger outlet which allows for a lot more flow. No matter how many rows or how big the tubes if the inlet and outlet "restrict" the flow it won't do any good. If you have a larger radiator it wouldn't hurt to give it a try, you can always buy and expensive aluminum one if you have to!!

                              treblig

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                I paid less than $200 for mine. Classic Custom Cooling CC4952 (ebay). Had to make a custom lower hose pipe, simply because I'm using a car water pump and the hose routing just couldn't get it.....

                                Your hose routing may be a problem as well, but I think they'll fix that as well if you call before ordering.

                                I was also putting a hawk engine into a truck..

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