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Vapor locking?

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  • #31
    If you listen to the farmers radio stations they always recommend to idle your hot tractor engines at least 15 minutes before shutting down. Perhaps a 3-5 minute idle would help to cool a hot car engine prior to shutting down. I was climbing a long grade in my motor home and at the summit there was a vista point, I didn't think about the hot engine and shut it off and it started to boil and gurgle and make all kinds of noises so I immediately restarted it and let it idle about 3 minutes and all was well again. The thing is, I new better, but just forgot for a moment. Other than other cooling issues this will help in the interim.

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    • #32
      I think idling the tractor was more about cooling the turbo than anything else. a diesel engine idling at 700 rpm can have turbo turning at 5000. got curios one day at NG armory and tested a hand held tach on a 2&1/2 ton truck w/ a465 cu.in Continental Multifuel engine. Luck Doofus

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      • #33
        Hey Doof! Did you know that the HHB 2/152 FA out of Ft. Smith had a 63 ( I think) Studebaker Deuce? it was a Turbo model and had a Studebaker Data plate on the right side inside the cab.
        I don't know if that truck is still there, last time I rode in it was summer of 96 while I was part of that unit.

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        • #34
          clothes pins work....

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          • #35
            I was just driving to the grocery store yesterday in central PA. Outside temp was about 88°. Sitting at an intersection waiting to turn and just as I started to move my '53 vapor locked. I barely coasted through and out of traffic. Rather than waiting an hour for it to cool off I got a bottle of water and a rag and wiped the wet rag along the fuel line from the pump to the carburetor. It only took a few minutes to cool enough to get the fuel to flow again. I know that's just an on the spot quick fix but it got me off the road and back home.
            I may just remove the hood/cowl seal as Ben recommends.
            "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

            Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
            '33 Rockne 10,
            '51 Commander Starlight,
            '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
            '56 Sky Hawk

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            • #36
              As a youngster, I don't recall many folks around me having Studebakers. But, back in the day, there was a lot of discussion about vapor lock, and my recollection was that it was a common occurrence regardless of the brand of automobile. However, back then, just as now, I also believe many of the problems that were called vapor lock, was a convenient scapegoat for other problems like poor maintenance, bad tune-ups, and folks (like me) tinkering with things under the hood they did not fully understand.

              As for true vapor lock...if it is a matter of "heat transfer"...instead of clamping a bunch of clothespins to look like a flock of doves on a power line...I think I would search for a supplier of finned tubing such as the example pictured below. When our cars were new, many had bulky oil bath air filters, and heavy gauge overbuilt oil filters and those things hold heat. I have replaced some of the big heat holding air filters with smaller, lighter, dry filter type air intakes. Also, when possible, I have moved fuel lines further away from exhaust manifolds. I'm not sure how much modern gas has to do with the problem, but I'm thinking it must be a factor.


              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

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              • #37
                I was just driving to the grocery store yesterday in central PA. Outside temp was about 88°. Sitting at an intersection waiting to turn and just as I started to move my '53 vapor locked. I barely coasted through and out of traffic. Rather than waiting an hour for it to cool off I got a bottle of water and a rag and wiped the wet rag along the fuel line from the pump to the carburetor. It only took a few minutes to cool enough to get the fuel to flow again. I know that's just an on the spot quick fix but it got me off the road and back home.
                I may just remove the hood/cowl seal as Ben recommends.

                Another old remedy was to carry cold grapefruits in the "ice" box. Whenever you vapor-locked......cut one in half and squish it around the fuel pump.....if leaking , you might get a few extra HP's ...

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                • #38
                  That's exactly how my Model A acts when I use the corn crap gas. And the Model A is gravity feed with no fuel pump. I would wrap all the fuel lines with a good thermal wrap, and add heat shields where possible to direct heat away from the carb. A small computer fan draws very little power and could direct cooler air over the carb.

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                  • #39
                    Idling your hot tractor before shut down was broadcast on the radio in the 50s and 60s long before turbos were in vogue. I still feel it is good practice to idle any hot engine before shut down.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by altair View Post
                      Idling your hot tractor before shut down was broadcast on the radio in the 50s and 60s long before turbos were in vogue. I still feel it is good practice to idle any hot engine before shut down.
                      I agree, and I even run my lawn mower at idle for a minute before stopping it.

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