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  • #16
    Originally posted by Daytona View Post
    I drove from SB, Ind. to Warwick,RI 65-70 MPH. car did not smoke people we went with did not see any smoke. Gas mileage was 17. Cannot see where oil went.
    Out the exhaust, todays oil burns very clean, unless in huge volumes at one time. Designed chemically to not foul catalytic converters when burned.

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    • #17
      To add to post #14, the only way to arrive at the proper fill level is at the time of a rebuild. When the engine is re-assembled and devoid of oil, fill the full-size filter with oil and put the balance of the 6 US quarts in the engine. Then run the engine up to temperature and shut down. Allow for 1 or 2 day drain-down. Pull the dipstick and note the oil level. This is your "full"
      level. This assumes that the car is sitting level and the engine is at a normal inclination. If you like a full line as a reference, then you can trim the top of the dipstick tube to bring the full line down to the oil level.
      The engine retains oil in the valley pockets and rocker shafts and heads as well as clinging to all internal surfaces. If you drain the oil in the pan and replace the filter and then add 6 quarts, you have over-filled the engine by 1/2 to 3/4 of a US quart.

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      • #18
        Unless all those pockets are already full of zinc and lead paste............

        Originally posted by WCP View Post
        To add to post #14, the only way to arrive at the proper fill level is at the time of a rebuild. When the engine is re-assembled and devoid of oil, fill the full-size filter with oil and put the balance of the 6 US quarts in the engine. Then run the engine up to temperature and shut down. Allow for 1 or 2 day drain-down. Pull the dipstick and note the oil level. This is your "full"
        level. This assumes that the car is sitting level and the engine is at a normal inclination. If you like a full line as a reference, then you can trim the top of the dipstick tube to bring the full line down to the oil level.
        The engine retains oil in the valley pockets and rocker shafts and heads as well as clinging to all internal surfaces. If you drain the oil in the pan and replace the filter and then add 6 quarts, you have over-filled the engine by 1/2 to 3/4 of a US quart.
        Dis-Use on a Car is Worse Than Mis-Use...
        1959 Studebaker Lark VIII 2DHTP

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        • #19
          45 years ago, I had a brand new 71 Plymouth Fury III with a 318 engine. It would throw/burn/reduce oil until it was 1/2 quart down from full on the dipstick (half way between full and add). Then it would stay at that level until time for an oil change. Eventually I learned to leave it at half quart below full.
          RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

          17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
          10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
          10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
          4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
          5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
          56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
          60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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          • #20
            BILT4ME, it wouldn't matter if your engine is full of sludge. Adding 6 quarts will still over-fill the engine.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
              Another thing to consider is Revs per mile, or simply stated what is the Trans. Type and Rear Axle Ratio?

              It would make a huge difference in Fuel and Oil consumption if you are running a Direct Trans. like: Automatic, Standard 3 or 4 Speed, with a Rear Axle Ratio anything Numerically Higher than 3.31 to 1 for Highway or Interstate cruising over 50 MPH.

              I do believe that straight 30 Wt. or 20W-50 would reduce it some, but the ultimate fix is likely a Hone and New Rings.
              I remember reading that a Studebaker engine could successfully 'overhauled' twice before needing a full blown rebuild. "Overhauled" meant rings and bearings, no 'punch' required.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by colt45sa View Post
                I remember reading that a Studebaker engine could successfully 'overhauled' twice before needing a full blown rebuild. "Overhauled" meant rings and bearings, no 'punch' required.

                That is my experience and with modern lubricants often last longer than the mileage total when overhauled...

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                • #23
                  .I am going start with 20/50 oil with zinc and see what happens. The oil pan was off cleaned and checked crank and rods. Did not pull heads for piston slop. didn't need to pull heads when new valve seals were installed. I am going to check compression

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by colt45sa View Post
                    I remember reading that a Studebaker engine could successfully 'overhauled' twice before needing a full blown rebuild. "Overhauled" meant rings and bearings, no 'punch' required.
                    I've never done one twice, but I "overhauled" a 289 out of a '64 Cruiser with 90,000 miles on it. Cylinder wall were barely worn. Just removed the slight ridge at the top and honed the cylinders. I figured the crank would require oversize bearings so I installed a set of .001 oversize. I decided to plastigage them and found it squashed all the way around the crank. So, I went back to standard bearings and even then the clearances were at the tight side of spec.
                    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Daytona View Post
                      .I am going start with 20/50 oil with zinc and see what happens. The oil pan was off cleaned and checked crank and rods. Did not pull heads for piston slop. didn't need to pull heads when new valve seals were installed. I am going to check compression
                      If it runs okay, and doesn't make any expensive noises, and uses a quart per thousand miles in hot weather, I'd call it good.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by jnormanh View Post
                        If it runs okay, and doesn't make any expensive noises, and uses a quart per thousand miles in hot weather, I'd call it good.
                        I agree, just drive and enjoy it. As the miles tick by, you will become real familiar with the engine's personality. When/if you ever do get round to an overhaul or rebuild, you will then notice any changes, good or bad, afterward. A, "bad" result of new pistons is that it will run hotter, at least for a few thousand miles. As is, at 60,000 miles, yours likely runs nice and cool, unless you have cooling system problems. If so, they are easily remedied without overhaul or rebuild.

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