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Bellhousing dialling

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  • #16
    I always understood that the Nose of the Converter merely rests in the opening of the Crankshaft bushing or not at all, and it can actually be removed with no harm because only the Standard Trans. Input Shaft actually goes INTO that bushing and hole in the Crank.

    The Converter Centers with the "Centering Tool" into the hole in the Converter Housing just like the Dial Indicator pointer does when Dialing the Housing, then the Converter to Flex plate Bolts are tightened.

    In the absence of the "J" Tool, rotating the Engine and Converter with the Bolts not quite tight should accomplish close to the same thing

    Someone correct me if that is the incorrect procedure, Please.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #17
      That's how we used to do it, two full turn with plugs out of course gets all bolt installed then tightened ,use a deep offset wrench for this task and you are home free,,,, eventually. Luck Doofus

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      • #18
        Thanks Rich- I was wondering about moving that bush. In doing that, the only limiting factor would be the clearance in the Flexplate holes. I could dial the TC nose closer in that case. I have actually fitted the Flightomatic up but I have no problems dismantling it again. Short of 'splitting' the bush carefully with a hacksaw blade- what is the best way of pulling this out?

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        • #19
          A dedicated bushing puller, or a cape chisel and hammer with caution. Doofus

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          • #20
            I decided to pull the installation apart again. My Lathe is out of action and I couldn't use it, but I made up a basic test rig by filing a hole in a big thick lump of chipboard and plugging the pilot stub of the TC into it for a firm fit. I could then rotate the flywheel flat against the board and dial indicate it with the magnetic base clamped to the board. This gave me a surprise result- The ACTUAL runout is only .008". this is within the realms of reality considering the whole shebang is a fabricated product. However, this situation now necessitates the realisation that the pilot bushing at the center of the crankshaft is nowhere near concentric. Once again I'm telling myself- "geeze this is rough". Stude Rich has suggested removal of the bush, so I reckon that's the next move; another choice is a bit of filing with my big bastard cut rat-tail file to bring everything over a bit more.

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            • #21
              The purpose of the crankshaft bushing is not to control the centering of the torque converter. It is a support for the nose only. A resting place. When the TC is installed into the splines of the transmission itself it will self center on the input shafts and engage the front pump, etc. The centering for run out occurs when the bell housing itself is installed on the dowels at the back of the block. The tranny will center when it is installed into the housing. The primary controller of centering is the bell housing and the dowels on the back of the engine.

              Once the tranny is finally bolted to the bell housing you can go back and torque down the converter to the flex plate.
              Start and Stage Your Studebakers

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              • #22
                The crank pilot bushing can be easily pulled with a puller called a "bicycle internal bearing puller". Here in Canada Princess Auto supply a cheap "made in China" version for not much money.

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                • #23
                  Hi Mate, Yes, I agree everything else will self align. The issue I believe I have is that the TC will run eccentrically in the front pump mechanical seal. I have filed out the bushing a bit off center and gotten within 0.009" runout. From what I can find out from seal manufacturers information, runout needs to be no more than .004" in the interests of longevity and oil retention. I'm nearly there.
                  Steve
                  Click image for larger version

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                  Last edited by Steve Winzar; 07-07-2016, 03:16 PM.

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                  • #24
                    After speaking with a club member respected for his knowledge of the Flightomatic, I have decided that I will replace the pilot bushing with a new one and install it all as it is. I may go as far as machining a centering tool and button the lot up.
                    Steve

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