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Anyone running E85 in a Stude?

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  • Anyone running E85 in a Stude?

    Anyone try running a Stude on E85 or other high ethanol blends? Any thoughts on what it would take to do the job? I imagine a freshly cleaned fuel tank, new lines, fresh pump and carb would be good insurance.
    Thanks!

    Charles Eck
    Essex, MD

    '57 Commander 4 door sedan, 'Bluebird'
    '66 Ford F-250
    '53 John Deere 50

    Studebakers were made to drive! (Besides, they don't get lost as easy in the Wal-Mart parking lot!)

  • #2
    Stude Folk are already green. Just ask 'em.

    Chris Pile
    The Studebaker Special
    Midway Chapter SDC
    The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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    • #3
      E85? Is that some kind of Borg-Warner Transmission? (Sorry, I can't help it, sometimes.) It--ethanol--prolly would work as well in a Studebaker, as it would in any other Car. They say it is a solvent, though, and can dissolve built up varnishes in the fuel system, which could be good or bad.

      "You Can't Have Everything--Where Would You Put It?" ---comedian Steven Wright

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      • #4
        Ran E85 in the 66 Daytona last year for a couple tanks and had nothing but trouble. I have NOT set up anything to compensate and quite frankly won't after finding out that the car ran horribly. I think I'll leave that fuel for the injected engines that are compensating with electronics. Oh, I wish we could buy real gas again........

        Brian K. Curtis,
        1925 Duplex-Phaeton ER
        1949 1/2 ton pickup
        1963 GT Hawk custom
        1966 Daytona 2dr

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        • #5
          Don't think we'd get a 'flex fuel' Stude without electronic injection. (Unless it would work running a twin carb manifold and one carb jetted for gas and one for E85? Hmmm....)
          My father has a couple 'flex fuel' machines from 1941! John Deere 'All Fuel' tractors! His H should be running by spring, I'll try E85 in it and see how she does.

          Charles Eck
          Essex, MD

          '57 Commander 4 door sedan, 'Bluebird'
          '66 Ford F-250
          '53 John Deere 50

          Studebakers were made to drive! (Besides, they don't get lost as easy in the Wal-Mart parking lot!)

          Comment


          • #6
            The John Deere I grew up with, (a 1937 GP) had a 1 gal tank for gasoline and a much larger tank for 'fuel'.You started on gas then switched tanks when it was warm. Not sure what the large tank was for, but it would run on Diesel fuel or Kerosene ('bout the same, then). Comp Ratio about 4 to 1. Alky would probably leak out the valve.

            [img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars3.jpg[/img=left]
            Tom Bredehoft
            '53 Commander Coupe
            '55 President State Sedan Project
            '60 Lark VI (Now on the market)
            '05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
            All Indiana built cars

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            • #7
              The old Olivers I had called for 70 Octane fuel. [:0] Tractor fuel (or distillate) was a low grade item, probably a couple of steps above used motor oil.


              Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

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              • #8
                The old John Deere ads claimed a wide variety of fuels could be used. Only 4 to 1 compression, not the best for alky, but should run just the same. E-85 wouldn't need as much warm up as tractor fuel.
                BTW, I saw an ad for mid thirties Stude trucks, aimed at sugar farmers, offering trucks set up for alky!

                Charles Eck
                Essex, MD

                '57 Commander 4 door sedan, 'Bluebird'
                '66 Ford F-250
                '53 John Deere 50

                Studebakers were made to drive! (Besides, they don't get lost as easy in the Wal-Mart parking lot!)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Unless you are one of the five or six racers running high boost superchargers and have plenty of time and money to find the combination, I can't imagine a single good reason to run E85 in a Studebaker:

                  1. E85 lower your fuel mileage by at least 15% and probably more.
                  2. It will attack the rubber in the older lines.
                  3. It will dissolve any varnish in the tank and carb, which could clog the filter and/or jets.
                  4. It requires completely rejetting the carburetor and re-curving the distributor advance to get anything like normal performance.

                  thnx, jv.


                  PackardV8
                  PackardV8

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                  • #10
                    What Jack said !!
                    Bill H
                    Daytona Beach
                    SDC member since 1970
                    Owner of The Skeeter Hawk .

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                    • #11
                      Actually I'm in the middle of converting my '63 Avanti right now. BUT, initially the engine will be a transplanted '06 5.3L Brand X, complete with the entire computer system. Already have a new Stainless Steel Gas tank installed(built by Rick's Hot Rods), SS lines and the fuel tank was modified to accept a stock '06 Tahoe fuel pump(important because the computer that figures out how much E85 is in your tank is in the Fuel Pump!) This has NOT been an easy transplant and I'm not sure I could recommend to anyone else, but it'll be different! Once I get some time on the engine and understand the complete system, I'll be rebuilding an R1 and refitting most of the electronics to Stude motor and have the REAL Studebaker Avanti E85. It'll be a daily driver, so I'm anticipating some radical changes to our fuel availability in the not too distant future. I'll keep all posted as I get closer to the road.

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                      • #12
                        The people at AA say " stay away from the stuff" The one thing E85 proved is that alcohol and gasoline do mix, but they taste terrible.
                        "hiccup" [] Studebakers weren't made for E85. I agree with above
                        responses. Also, alcohol is extremely corrosive to various metals.
                        The last thing a Studebaker needs is an additional reason to corrode.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As Harvey mentioned, currosion is a big problem. I have a Ford Ranger with E-85 campabilities. But the entire system is stainless, including the $900 fuel pump. The octane is higher, and in theory, it will help with knock control. But unless you have electronic controls or set the engine up for E-85 only, you'll have problems. Obviously numerous drag cars over time have run on alcohol so it can be made to work, but you can't just put it in your tank without making changes.

                          Yes, fuel economy will suffer by 15%. If you can find it at the pump 15% less than gasoline, it might be worth your while. But here in Florida there are 3-5 pumps in the entire state, and the closest one to me is 50 miles away in Bradenton. I'd have to dedicate 100 miles per tank to fuel fill ups. This wouldn't make sense.

                          ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Tom - Valrico, FL

                          1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $1755.45)

                          Tom - Bradenton, FL

                          1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                          1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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                          • #14
                            I can't believe what a hoax this whole mess is! We're being force-fed this junk, in spite of the facts that prove what a bad idea it is![}] In addition to what Jack said, you can add that although it's claimed that E85 can be made out of lots on different materials- seaweed, wood chips, etc.- it's mainly made from corn, driving the price of that up for everyone; in exchange for a fuel that's less efficient, harmful to most vehicles without EXPENSIVE mods, and costs more to produce[xx(]

                            Where I live, the local mediais all agog over plans to make this stuff in a long-closed Miller brewing plant. No one cares about things like viability, just looking for the factory jobs...

                            Absence of big picture and long term vision seems all to common these days

                            Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                            Parish, central NY 13131


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                            • #15
                              My current thinking is I'll install a 'flex fuel' conversion in the '05 Volvo, as there are a few E85 dealers in MD, PA and VA in places I visit. The prices I am seeing make up for the lower mileage.
                              As I work on the Commander I intend to clean and coat the tank, run new SS fuel lines, install a fresh pump and a new Edelbrock 500 CFM carb. As E85 sources get closer to home I figure on re jetting a second carb for alky. (When I was 15 I used to swap carbs on my Hawk out of boredom after school! I know it's not a big job!)
                              Like it or not, fuels are changing. Modern gasoline won't support a high compression engine anymore. The Middle East is very unstable, and so will be gasoline prices.
                              If I can send my fuel dollars to American farmers instead of Mid-East oil wells, I feel better. If I keep driving my Stude, I have to prepare it for alky exposure anyway, so why not learn about a full conversion? I might even set up a still myself, my uncle did twenty years ago. Wish I talked to him about it more while he was alive.

                              Charles Eck
                              Essex, MD

                              '57 Commander 4 door sedan, 'Bluebird'
                              '66 Ford F-250
                              '53 John Deere 50

                              Studebakers were made to drive! (Besides, they don't get lost as easy in the Wal-Mart parking lot!)

                              Comment

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