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Engine Rebuild, pre-lube, and couldn't you run starter to "oil it up" without starting it?

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  • bsrosell
    replied
    Originally posted by doofus View Post
    After all that, try this. once engine is in chassis and all connected pull plugs, spin over with starter. you should get oil pressure in few seconds, crank gets turned (Obviously) and everything that needs pressure oiling gets it. We used to run new engines on stand we built for this task. when engine went in it was ready for the road. Opinions vary but this is still a good way to accomplish a task. Luck Doofus
    Doofus and all; thanks for the tips; sounds good enough for me. I was very careful to get some pre-lube smeared on all the moving parts so I've got some time at startup to get that oil pressure up, this should be good (though I like that idea of using an old distributor shaft too; good idea.) See how long I end up having to make the poor girl wait for me before she gets to RUN as intended!! :-)
    Again, thanks all!!! So appreciate the many answers to my "newbie" (on the V8 rebuild anyway) questions.

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  • bsrosell
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
    First, sitting "idle" does..."no" harm. The major thing is to not adjust the valves until you are ready to fire the engine. Everything else...doesn't care. Even the springs in most Stude combinations...don't care (low lift).

    Packing the oil pump...myth. Once the pump is submerged in oil (5 quarts in the pan !)...the oil will seek out places to go (check your driveway..!), this includes filling the pump cavity..!

    Spinning the crank with the starter...why ? Just get a distributor with a bad drive gear, grind all of the teeth off the gear, remove the guts from the upper portion of the assembly till you have just a bare shaft...wa-la, you have a perfect Stude V-8 primer tool..!

    Several places DO NOT get oil from just spinning a crank shaft with the starter, BUT...you are making them move...NOT a good idea.
    1. Piston rings.
    2. Wrist pins.
    3. Valve guides

    Again not a good idea.
    Mike
    Thanks Mike: my concern is living in Minnesota, the temp changes can cause condensation, even in my insulated (and heated only when I'm working in there) shop. So, really just cylinder bore I'm trying to protect more than anything. My Model-A Ford engine sat two years on the stand though (with prelube on most everything, even cylinders as I'd never heard that could be bad for rings later), and it has run great since. So, you're likely right.
    Re: the Vaseline; might be myth, but I'm just following the instructions in the Stude Shop Manual (for '56-57 anyway). Never done a V8 before, so I'm following instructions to a "t" as much as possible. :-)

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  • jackb
    replied
    What did the factory perform on the new engines before startup at the end of the assembly line ??

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  • doofus
    replied
    After all that, try this. once engine is in chassis and all connected pull plugs, spin over with starter. you should get oil pressure in few seconds, crank gets turned (Obviously) and everything that needs pressure oiling gets it. We used to run new engines on stand we built for this task. when engine went in it was ready for the road. Opinions vary but this is still a good way to accomplish a task. Luck Doofus

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeHall
    replied
    Its hard to go wrong. If turning the pump the wrong way, you will hear gurgling in the oil pan.

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    Lube everything during assembly then forget it until you are ready to run it.
    I use Mystik JT-6 High Temp red grease as an assembly lube.
    If I was to turn the engine over, then the grease will get wiped off the cam lobes.
    Just try to store it in a climate controlled place if possible.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1954khardtop
    replied
    Wayne, You are right, counter clockwise. I spun mine with a cordless drill at full speed, watching the gauge. I spun it for a few minutes after the oil pressure came up.

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  • wdills
    replied
    Basic question. Please verify which way the drill runs when spinning the oil pump. I am thinking counter clockwise. Is there any limit on how fast I should turn the pump?

    Thanks
    Wayne

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    Something else that has been mentioned here before from very knowledgeable members but I don't see it here is that; Yes running a Drill on the oil Pump is the very best way to lube up a fresh engine BUT, remember to give it a couple of "Turns" during the process because the Main Bearing Oil holes in the Crank are only exposed to the Oil Holes in the block at certain intervals and those are what Oil the Rod Bearings, so not ALL get Oil unless the crank is moved at least 180'.

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  • JoeHall
    replied
    I once started up a 259 rebuild without spinning the pump first, and damaged #1 and 2 rod bearings. That was in spite of having used assembly lube. Its too easy to spin the pump, I have never failed to do so since, and highly recommend it. As mentioned, an old distributor with the gears ground off works great. I then use a 1/2" drill, with variable speed trigger, and turn it slowly till oil is dripping from the rockers, and the pressure shows on the gauge.

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  • Buzzard
    replied
    I have always gutted a distributor and modify the shaft as necessary to fit a cordless drill (cord type in the old days) and spin the shaft until pressure on a manual gauge shows lots of good pressure. (Verify the direction of rotation first). Now you know everything is lubed as if it had just been running.
    Good luck,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • swvalcon
    replied
    Check with snap on tool or maybe even harbor freight they should have a tool kit that will prime any make engine you need. I think it has different adapters to fit almost any thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    First, sitting "idle" does..."no" harm. The major thing is to not adjust the valves until you are ready to fire the engine. Everything else...doesn't care. Even the springs in most Stude combinations...don't care (low lift).

    Packing the oil pump...myth. Once the pump is submerged in oil (5 quarts in the pan !)...the oil will seek out places to go (check your driveway..!), this includes filling the pump cavity..!

    Spinning the crank with the starter...why ? Just get a distributor with a bad drive gear, grind all of the teeth off the gear, remove the guts from the upper portion of the assembly till you have just a bare shaft...voila, you have a perfect Stude V-8 primer tool..!

    Several places DO NOT get oil from just spinning a crank shaft with the starter, BUT...you are making them move...NOT a good idea.
    1. Piston rings.
    2. Wrist pins.
    3. Valve guides

    Again not a good idea.

    Mike
    Last edited by hausdok; 06-26-2016, 01:31 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Engine Rebuild, pre-lube, and couldn't you run starter to "oil it up" without starting it?

    As I very slowly work my way through my Golden Hawk project (I have to use a walker now, long story, if careful, a cane gets me by in the shop) , plus work, and five kids... obviously not everything will be "started up" in short sequence like at the factory. I'm going on like year 5... but at least have EVERYTHING, like a model-set, ready to put back together now. Only the frame/differential needs blasting and painting; body is on a cart, welding done.... But still a couple years at my rate and abilities. Thus my question:

    Right now, my engine is getting close; hope to get the heads put back together , maybe even ON, today. I pre-lubed bearings, cam, timing/crank gears, and will do the same with valve stems/guides and rockers, etc... (pistons I only dipped in 50W oil, so I wouldn't cram the rings full of prelube). And I crammed the oil pump full of Vaseline like the good Shop book says .

    QUESTION: even though my engine will be forced to sit on the stand for the next.... year? longer?, before it gets mounted in the FRAME... (after I get my differential, gas/brake lines and frame done, which is "next" on the list), AFTER I get it in the frame and bell-housing put on, why couldn't a guy crank the engine over for several minutes (cooling off the starter obviously; not continuous) with the plugs out (no compression, easy spin), and spin that oil pump good and pump all those pipes and channels and bearing caps full of oil, keeping it lubed and preventing ANY corrosion on spots possibly missed by prelube or in cylinders? If I did that every few months on the frame (can't mount starter on the engine stand I remembered) everything would be lubricated ALL OVER, not just where I got pre-lube.... "Sitting idle" isn't good for anything on a car..... (my dad has five old cars on the farm; all I get done up there when I go up is trying to start and get a few miles on each one a few times a year, just to 'maintain'!)

    Even if I "skip" what I explain above (regular "spin the starter", while getting chassis completed and then bodywork, reassembly and such....) seems reasonable to install distributor and such right before you start the engine the first time, and then cranking starter minus plugs (& gas line disconnected?) as the "last thing" before I start it, so oil pump will still prime easy (I hope?) being full of Vaseline. I just happened to think turning it over with STARTER (and no plugs) would push oil around the system before you put STRESS on the system. Thoughts? Flaws in my logic? Not enough RPM from starter to really generate any oil pressure perhaps??
    (and yes, plan to add a small shot of ZDDP(?) to my oil as I do to my Model-A Ford....
    Thanks!
    Last edited by bsrosell; 06-25-2016, 08:05 AM.
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