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58 fuel pump upgrade, what is needed

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  • Fuel System: 58 fuel pump upgrade, what is needed

    I have new old stock fuel pump. If I change the diaphragm to handle new gasoline, is that sufficient?

    Don
    sigpic
    58 Golden Hawk
    DSamborski
    Pillager, MN

  • #2
    For the time being. spray a little WD40 on check valves before reassembly,helps seal and start pumping action. Have seen this modern "Gasoline" eat gas proof hose more than once same for diaphrams. Good Luck in any case Doofus

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    • #3
      Cheaper in the long run to buy NON-Ethanol gas... more expensive at the pump, but saved me a lot of headaches...

      For daily drivers (modern stuff) I use the regular ethanol 10% stuff.

      but for Studebakers, Airplanes, Weedeaters, Lawnmowers, Tractors (Stuff that don't run every day), I buy only the Non-Ethanol which last night was $2.59 compared to $2.00 for E10.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the help. I only use the high grade gas. Don't drive much anyway so the higher price and higher octane is all around better for the engine.
        sigpic
        58 Golden Hawk
        DSamborski
        Pillager, MN

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        • #5
          You can get a complete fuel pump rebuild kit from "Then and Now". I rebuilt my fuel pump with one of their kits so that modern fuel will not destroy it. Just Google, Then and Now fuel pump rebuild kit".
          sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
          1950 Champion Convertible
          1950 Champion 4Dr
          1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
          1957 Thunderbird

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          • #6
            I don't know if the higher grade Gas is Non-Ethanol or not. Most gas grades I see are Ethanol Stuff. I have to Buy my Non-Ethanol where it's advertised as Non-Ethanol on the Pump. If there's a sticker on the pump that essentially states that "this gasoline may contain as much as XX % ethanol content." then it's ethanol, and should not be used in an engine that does a lot of sitting, or anything older than 20.

            Originally posted by don samborski View Post
            Thanks for the help. I only use the high grade gas. Don't drive much anyway so the higher price and higher octane is all around better for the engine.

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            • #7
              While I agree that most available gas is ethanol laced, it has been almost 30 years since the last carbureted car was produced for sale in the US, 1988. Mechanical engine driven fuel pumps for non-fuel injected engines died even before that, around 1980 or so. Those of us that "need" unlaced fuel are a very small percent of the market. Even super high premium "race gas" has alcohols and oxygen enhancing ingredients that can pose problems for our car,s left in original condition. So-adapt your components as best you can, it doesn't appear it will change anytime soon, and may get worse, despite the illogic of it.

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              • #8
                If your original pump is a Carter and you were smart enough to save it, send it out to have it rebuilt by one of the many people listed in Hemmings who do that. I like Dave Thibeault in Mass. It will cost less than one of the replacements sold by our vendors, it will have the diaphram replaced by an alcohol resistant diaphram, it won't have been built in China, and it will last far, far longer than the AirTex (junk, junk, junk, junk) pumps that are bering sold now. I learned the hard way. I bought an AirTex which lasted 9 months. Fortunately I had saved the original which I sent out for rebuild and I've been good ever since. Forget the premium fuel. Your low compression motor can't take advantage of the higher octane. Find a source of 90 octane Recreational fuel (non-alcohol) or find an additive at the auto parts store. I can't recommend an additive because I use the Rec fuel.

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                • #9
                  I've found that I can get Non-Ethanol fuel at my local Farmer's Coop and is marked that way on the pump. Some stations still sell it, but it's a bit pricey compared to the regular pump stuff.

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