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  • Engine: Timing gear??

    My 62 Lark V8 loses power at low speeds, bucks, and will stall unless I pump the gas. It starts right back up hot or cold. I have replaced plug wires, points, condenser, cap and rotor to no avail. New plugs last year. I checked the timing, and noticed that the timing mark advances a lot as I increase rpms (it advances far enough so I can't see it). As it advances the engine begins to die. Excuse the basic question, but I thought that the mark should remain stable. That's how it works on my 49 Champion and it runs great (advances a little and then stabilizes.) So, I suspect that this might be a timing problem. The dwell does not fluctuate at all, which I think indicates that the distributor is probably okay. Could this be a slipping timing gear? I have replaced two timing gears on Champions over the years and both times the engine just quit. Easy to diagnose since the distributor did not turn on both cars. I would rather not tear down the Lark only to find that the timing gear is fine.

    I have not checked fuel pressure. Could this possibly be the problem? I run an Airtex electric pump for starts and vapor lock. The mechanical pump is about five years old. Again excuse the basic question, but I thought that a mechanical pump either worked or did not.

    I can do most basic repairs on my cars but as you can see I need help diagnosing basic problems. Any advice from more knowledgeable and experienced hands would be greatly appreciated!

  • #2
    That is what this forum is all about,experienced Studebaker owners helping new
    members with their problems.
    First of all I think your problem is in your distributor in 1962 V8 they used an Autolite and they were not the best.
    If it was a timing gear failure it would not run at all.
    Is your engine original or modified.
    You may have two problems.
    The springs on the advance mechanism in the distributor are missing or incorrect.
    the wrong vacuum advance was used.
    The stalling maybe caused by incorrect routing of the ignition wires.
    There are many Studebaker old timers in Kansas that would gladly show of their
    knowledge and keep an other one on the road.
    Did you join the local Studebaker chapter of the SDC?
    If not , locals should invite you to join.
    Robert Kapteyn
    http://sagebrushstudebaker.com/fixlst5.html

    See#4
    Last edited by rkapteyn; 06-16-2016, 09:23 AM.

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    • #3
      Verify that the vacuum advance works.
      Put a long rubber/plastic tube on the vacuum advance pipe (coming off the distributor). Pop the top of the distributor, suck on the tube and see if the internal mechanism of the distributor turns. (This is with the engine not running) If it doesn't move, or if you suck and don't build a vacuum, the diaphragm in the mechanism has failed. You will need to find a replacement, I don't believe they are rebuild-able.
      If it does move, check to see that when the accelerator (or its linkage) is moved there is gas (fuel) squirted into the carb throat. If not, the accelerator pump needs refreshed.
      One of these may solve your problem.

      Comment


      • #4
        Timing gears will not slip or move when they are bolted in to place, they stay there. Follow Tom Bs directions. Some early models did not have a vacuum advance and relied on centrifugal weights only for advance. With a short quick acceleration the engine could backfire with the vacuum advance system allowed an earlier advance to avoid the backfire. Your problem seems fairly routine it is just finding it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Would almost bet distributor related. I wouldn't spend a lot of money repairing what you have. Just get a new electronic one.

          Comment


          • #6
            Sounds fuel related. With motor off, look down the throat of the carb to see if the accelerator pumps are squirting. They should begin to squirt from the instant the linkage is moved, and stop about half way through linkage travel. If no squirt, fix the accelerator pump. If it squirts, do a fuel pressure check. If FP is OK, look for transitioning problems between idle and intermediate circuits, i.e. low floats, stuck inlet valve, clogged air ports, power valve, etc..

            Also, check the intake manifold bolt tightness, and gaskets.

            Comment


            • #7
              The timing mark on the damper should move with the timing light and advance as you increase engine speed, and then returning to the mark on the timing cover. Now the amount and speed of it advancing is in the distributor mechanism, and the vacuum advance. Stalling of the engine from too much timing doesn't seem correct, stalling as you release the throttle from not enough timing can be the vacuum advance gone bad. Running out of fuel supply does sound correct and can be anything from a clogged carb jet, bad fuel pump, collapsed hose. Since you have to pump the gas to keep from stalling, it appears you accelerator pump is squirting gas to keep it running but not getting enough fuel at higher RPM to keep it running without the squirt. Have you tried not turning off the electric pump? If the problem goes away your mechanical fuel pump may be shot, or the rubber line from the frame to the mechanical fuel pump might be collapsing when it tries to suck fuel and the electric pump isn't pushing fuel keeping it open--try it see what happens.
              Last edited by karterfred88; 06-16-2016, 10:40 AM.

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              • #8
                New improved (sintered iron, bronze bushed) advance weights are available for '62 -'64 Prestolite distributors. This makes them better than new. If you have worked on a number of distributors, you can recognize that the Prestolite is a great distributor once the worn advance weights are replaced.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think that the problem may be in fuel delivery. Where is the electric pump located (by the fuel tank or up front)? Do you only run it as needed or is it on all of the time that the ignition is on? I believe that you should use either the electric pump or the mechanical pump, not both.
                  You have the symptoms of drawing air into the fuel delivery. This can be from a deteriorated or loose flexilble line or rust holes, usually at a clamp, in the steel line.
                  Gary L.
                  Wappinger, NY

                  SDC member since 1968
                  Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Studebakercenteroforegon View Post
                    New improved (sintered iron, bronze bushed) advance weights are available for '62 -'64 Prestolite distributors. This makes them better than new. If you have worked on a number of distributors, you can recognize that the Prestolite is a great distributor once the worn advance weights are replaced.
                    Where is the best place to buy the new, improved bushings?
                    Thanks

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
                      Where is the best place to buy the new, improved bushings?
                      Thanks
                      If you are referring to the improved Prestolite advance weights that have bronze bushings, that would be 516196 in the current Studebaker International catalog, page 213. Their caption says brass bushings, but they are bronze.
                      Last edited by Studebakercenteroforegon; 06-16-2016, 05:35 PM.

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                      • #12
                        The shaft bushings wear out too. I replaced the distributor in my 64 with an earlier delco window unit.

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                        • #13
                          Check for vacuum leaks by spraying WD40 around the carb & the intake & all hoses coming out of the intake manifold too. Although it does sound to me as a distributor problem a lean condition would cause your symptoms to occur also.
                          59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                          60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                          61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                          62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                          62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                          62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                          63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                          63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                          64 Zip Van
                          66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                          66 Cruiser V-8 auto

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Leave the electric pump on and disconnect the vacuum advance unit and try it. i have seen a bad vacuum unit do this before twice once on a ford and once on a Stude. not sure an airtex pump will allow much fuel to be pulled through it. the pump should be mounted at rear near tank and level with bottom of tank, they don't pull well but will push fuel forward OK. Luck Doofus

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Studebakercenteroforegon View Post
                              If you are referring to the improved Prestolite advance weights that have bronze bushings, that would be 516196 in the current Studebaker International catalog, page 213. Their caption says brass bushings, but they are bronze.
                              GREAT !
                              Thanks much.

                              Comment

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