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  • Cool/Heat: Evans waterless cooling

    Anyone try this?

    http://www.onallcylinders.com/2016/0...rless-cooling/

    Available at Summit for about $45 a gallon.

    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/evn-ec53001/overview/

    I am considering it for my new build. Looks to me like the biggest drawback is trying to get ALL the old coolant and water out of your system. However, since my block will have recently been boiled out and cleaned, and the heads are fresh from the machine shop, and I will be replacing all my hoses, as well as having the heater core gone through, the only thing I will have to flush is the radiator itself.

    No pressure, no boil over.

    Looks too good to be true. Talked to a guy Sunday who is using it in one of his cars, and he loves it. Claims it runs about 10 degrees cooler (although, I would expect that t-stat to regulate the temp at the same place).

    Just wondering if anyone here has tried it.

  • #2
    I've been using Evans in some vehicles for a few years now. I don't believe your car will run any cooler (and I don't think Evans makes that claim). Anything that tends to run hot will still run hot, but with Evans it will not boil, and you do not have to use a pressure cap to raise the boiling temperature like you have to do with water and antifreeze. Boil overs using water is the real danger becasue once the water turns to steam there is no cooling effect at all, and internal engine temps can climb dramatically. If there is any disadvantage to Evans (other than cost) it is that there is a definite smell -- especially when you open the hood, you'll smell a fairly strong pnacake syrup smell.

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    • #3
      Haven't tried it.

      And likely won't at least until I can get enough info to figure out if its low specific heat, low heat of vaporization and high viscosity ( 3 to 4 times more viscous than 50/50 normal coolant) (all relative to water and even water/regular coolant mix) is offset by the high boiling point.
      Also to somehow ensure that it won't lead to even higher than normal temperature gradients in cylinder heads near valve seats and spark plugs, which is a big part of cylinder head cracking.

      As I recall some of their certified tests include in the conclusions that some of the benefits won't be realized unless the engine is modified to take advantage of the higher operating temperatures.

      http://www.evanscoolant.com/faq/operation/
      Their own FAQs states this - "Vehicles running under normal operating conditions should show either no change or a slight increase in temperature."

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      • #4
        I wasn't buying the claim that the car ran cooler either.

        I would really like to hear from someone who used it and found a downside in the real world (other than the smell Mike mentioned).

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        • #5
          Banged around before. http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...=evans+coolant

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          • #6
            Thanks sob. I tried a search of Evans coolant before starting this thread, but got nothing.

            Still haven't seen anything (other than the cost) to dissuade me from using it on this build.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Lynn View Post
              Thanks sob. I tried a search of Evans coolant before starting this thread, but got nothing.

              Still haven't seen anything (other than the cost) to dissuade me from using it on this build.
              Lynn - Secret to success is use Google " Evans Coolant Studebaker " to find it here. Google is much better than our search engine. Good luck, and let us know if you use it. A lot of us are curious. Bob

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              • #8
                This stuff sounds like 'Snake Oil' to good old SN-60!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
                  This stuff sounds like 'Snake Oil' to good old SN-60!
                  Let's call it ethylene glycol, snake oil would cost a lot more. They seem to have found an interesting glycol/H2O ratio (3%) that gives a decent combination of cooling and other properties. It won't be for everyone but if one knows the in's and out's going in they can an educated decision if it's worth the effort.

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                  • #10
                    I have a friend that has a Sunbeam Tiger that's modified. 347 cu. in, AFR heads & topped off with a Paxton. Needless to say it ran hot & he talked about converting it to Evans coolant. I'll call him tomorrow & see if he has it back on the road yet.
                    59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                    60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                    61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                    62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                    62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                    62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                    63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                    63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                    64 Zip Van
                    66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                    66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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                    • #11
                      I recall Evans advertising many mango seasons ago in Hot Rod and what I also remember is it required a special water pump. I take it that is no longer the case? I've never been interested in it, so too lazy to do anymore research other than my questionable memory from many years ago.
                      -------------------
                      Daddy always said, if yer gonna be dumb, you gotta be tough & I\'m one tough sumbiatch!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
                        This stuff sounds like 'Snake Oil' to good old SN-60!
                        Snake oil indeed. Nothing, NOTHING, cools better than water. Of course you need something to lower the freezing temp, and raise the boiling point - presto/bingo, 50/50, modern, non toxic propylene glycol with rust inhibitors, available everywhere under a few dozen different names.

                        But for those folks who believe copper bracelets cure arthritis, and ginger cures cancer, and some company you never heard of knows more than DuPont about chemistry, there's Evans miracle coolant.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well, I just spent (wasted or invested depending on your point of view) an hour reading the debates on several "car guy" web sites. Man, this brings more passionate (and some very illogical) arguments than Zinc in oil or whether my 69 Z/28 wheels are "hub centric or lug centric". BTW, they are hub centric.

                          Anyway after all the reading, I found a total of ONE person who actually used it and wasn't happy with it. His reason: He believes his auxiliary fan came on more often when parking the car with Evans than it did with the old 50/50/.

                          Pretty sure I am not setting up the 49 Studebaker with any electric auxiliary fans. Anyway, if I had to go to the trouble of the complete flush that would be required to CHANGE OVER, this wouldn't be on the table. But since this is a new build, and I will have a completely clean slate (radiator, engine, hoses, etc.) with no water present, I see no reason to not try it. I will report back, good bad and ugly.

                          BTW, I don't believe it is a miracle coolant. Just see it as a smart alternative. Some really smart guys get it wrong some times. Henry Ford refused to put hydraulic brakes on cars until something like 1937. He was the biggest, but didn't make all his decisions the best. Just because DuPont didn't come up with it doesn't make it crap.
                          Last edited by Lynn; 06-15-2016, 07:16 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jnormanh View Post
                            Snake oil indeed. Nothing, NOTHING, cools better than water. Of course you need something to lower the freezing temp, and raise the boiling point - presto/bingo, 50/50, modern, non toxic propylene glycol with rust inhibitors, available everywhere under a few dozen different names.

                            But for those folks who believe copper bracelets cure arthritis, and ginger cures cancer, and some company you never heard of knows more than DuPont about chemistry, there's Evans miracle coolant.
                            I have used this snake oil (Evans Coolant) for over 15 years in our R1 Cruiser with absolutely no problems!
                            I also used it in my R2 Avanti with great results until I sold it and the next owner said the same when I saw it a few years later.
                            Most additives I am also leery of, but it's not an additive. A Studebaker club member told me he was using it in his truck for about 10 years and let me see his clean water jacket when he opened it up to take a look (clean as a whistle).

                            Just like synthetic dot 5 silicon brake fluid, I would only want to use it in a clean system.
                            It has a very fine molecular structure and will seep anywhere that's not sealed well because of rust, or bad hose etc. I found my water manifold had slight warp that seeped when I first used it (fixed and no problems).
                            The perfect time to switch is when rebuilding engine, with radiator, new water pump, hoses, etc.
                            Without any water, or air in the system, it's like having a lubricant and no rust in the radiator, no rust in the heater core, or water pump!
                            Without the need for pressurizing the radiator cap, my hoses, heater core and water pump are still doing great after 15 years and many miles.
                            I have not flushed the system and it's fine, but if I were to drive cross country I would probably bring a spare hose and gallon of coolant in the trunk (in case something ruptured a hose).
                            Water cools fine, but requires additives (snake oil?) to inhibit rust , etc that goes bad and can end up with rusty, overheated, boiling system.

                            Evans Coolant is also environmentally safe and if your pet drinks any it won't harm, or kill them like regular antifreeze.

                            I didn't want to be ignorant until I heard from people who actually used it.
                            It's not something like a placebo snake oil additive that people can say it "feels like" it runs better (even corrosion would still happen).
                            There are many people who do know about the company and are using the coolant in all types of cars, tractors, trucks and motorcycles.

                            http://www.evanscoolant.com/videos/jay-leno39s-garage/

                            I still use water and green stuff in many vehicles, but won't hesitate upgrading to Evans when I'm rebuilding my vehicles.

                            James
                            Bells Studebaker Diner & Museum
                            Bellingham, WA.

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                            • #15
                              I had a radiator in my brand x car that failed from old age and was over heating I replaced it with an after market brand and the over heating continued, within a year I had to replace this new after market radiator only to have the over heating continue. Every theory known to man was cast my way as to the cause from a porus block to electrolysis. I took the heads in for resurfacing, replaced the water pump, thermostat, clutch fan all to no avail the over heating continued. The second after market radiator was leaking all around the seams, I was most upset with this ordeal and replaced the radiator with a factory unit and presto and was normal again. I took the second after market radiator back to the dealer and his immediate response was that I had an electrolysis problem with my vehicle and continued to defend his determination by giving me several examples of failed radiators because of electrolysis. The supplier was also a big defender of their product and offered several pages of examples of failed radiators because of electrolysis. When I returned to the dealer with my failed radiator I was just as adamant that the problem was not electrolysis with considerable backup defence. The radiator was returned to the supplier for an inspection and determination, after about a week of testing the supplier admitted the radiator was faulty and replaced the unit free. I never did put the radiator into service and it remains in the original box in my basement. During the 2-1/2 years of extreme over heating and general radiator problems Evans Coolant was suggested to prevent my "electrolysis" problem as it is a non-conductor. I am very conversant with electrolysis as I use it nearly every day for general cleaning, the dealer, supplier and myself had a somewhat spirited discussion on the subject. All their examples of electrolysis problems were bogus, the radiators were junk and all the Evans Coolant you could put in the radiator would have not made any difference. I am not denouncing Evans Waterless Coolant it was just that they felt that it would cure the problem of their faulty product. Just a side note ethylene glycol is a good conductor it will not cure electrolysis. In extreme fire conditions it will burn.

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