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Seat foam

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  • Seat foam

    I am thinking about refoaming the seats on my Lark myself, I was going to buy the covers and send them to a shop and get them done. But I think I can do it! I just need to know how thick the foam material is? Thanks in advance!

    Randy_G
    1959 Lark Sedan
    www.AutomotiveHistoryOnline.com


  • #2
    No upholsterers in our group?[V]
    "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

    Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
    Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
    sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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    • #3
      There is just not a simple answer to your question. There is different foam parts, and the are molded and shaped to fit. Upholstery shops have a foam knife but you can use a electric kitchen knife. I can't do it myself, but that's what I read, it's a bit of a art to get the padding just right.

      JDP/Maryland
      63 R2 SuperHawk (Caesar)
      spent to date $54664,75
      64 R2 GT (Sid)
      spent to date $62,439.30
      63 Lark 2 door
      51 Commander
      39 Coupe express
      39 Coupe express (rod)

      JDP Maryland

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      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by Randy_G

        I am thinking about refoaming the seats on my Lark myself, I was going to buy the covers and send them to a shop and get them done. But I think I can do it! I just need to know how thick the foam material is? Thanks in advance!

        Randy_G
        1959 Lark Sedan
        www.AutomotiveHistoryOnline.com

        Get yourself a big block of foam and (like JP said) an electric kitchen knife and then simply cut away everything that doesn't look like a 1959 Lark seat cushion.
        Note: this is a joke, sort of, but it is one way to do it.

        Jerry Forrester
        Douglasville, Georgia
        Be sure to check out my eBay store
        http://stores.ebay.com/CHROME-CHROME-CHROME_
        for your shiny Stude stuff

        More pix of Leo the '55 Pres HT here...http://tinyurl.com/2gj6cu
        Jerry Forrester
        Forrester's Chrome
        Douglasville, Georgia

        See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

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        • #5
          Another idea you can try is take it to shop that does seats and get an estimate.. Then ask them questions, type of foam, thickness they use, etc....sit down and figure whether you want to try it or have them do it...





          New Jersey & Studes Perfect Together

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          • #6
            I use a seratted knife or a saw to get it close then I use a die gringer with about a 16 disc on it to get it perfect.

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            • #7
              Well since I've only seen one 59 besides mine that had an interior in it. I guess I will be buying the covers and having it done. I appreciate all the helpful advice.

              Randy_G
              1959 Lark Sedan
              www.AutomotiveHistoryOnline.com

              Comment


              • #8
                If you do have it done by someone, shop around for estimates...I needed the drivers seat on my Avanti done, usual, seat ripped/worn, foam dried out.. had the material for the seat..Went to one place and the guy wanted $1200...went to a different place on the other side of my county and found a place that did it for $300.....



                New Jersey & Studes Perfect Together

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                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by bonehead007

                  If you do have it done by someone, shop around for estimates...I needed the drivers seat on my Avanti done, usual, seat ripped/worn, foam dried out.. had the material for the seat..Went to one place and the guy wanted $1200...went to a different place on the other side of my county and found a place that did it for $300.....
                  A well regarded shop in town quoted me $700 for rebuilding/recovering my Avanti front pair.
                  OR
                  I could buy a complete kit for $550+ shipping (and have supplus back seat covers) and they'll instrall them for about $300 ...$850 total.
                  Anyone have any recommendations?



                  63 Avanti R1 2788
                  1914 Stutz Bearcat
                  (George Barris replica)

                  Washington State
                  63 Avanti R1 2788
                  1914 Stutz Bearcat
                  (George Barris replica)

                  Washington State

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                  • #10
                    "IF" the shop can replicate the grain, color and style to match the rear, just do the front, if not, do the full set. My covers here:
                    http://stude.com/covers/colors.htm

                    JDP/Maryland
                    63 R2 SuperHawk (Caesar)
                    spent to date $54664,75
                    64 R2 GT (Sid)
                    spent to date $62,439.30
                    63 Lark 2 door
                    51 Commander
                    39 Coupe express
                    39 Coupe express (rod)

                    JDP Maryland

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Actually, JDP is quite on the money. That is how I repaired my front seats. Put in the foam, trimmed like hell! Then to make sure of a nice fit I cover the foam with an old t-shirt to see how it would look. Fitted in some different, looser padding, then smoothed it out. When it looked about perfect, I installed JDP's seat covers. Voila, great complements at shows. Nice and neat looking, clean and comfortable. Not factory--but better than a 'ratty' look. Time and patience and don't be afraid to take a part and reposition and re-cut foam. If your springs aren't all facing straight up (coils) you can straighten them by tying them to each other with wire, rope, or plastic ties. I have been doing this on many different types of cars through the years. Practice, practice and fit and re-fit!!! Better than paying exorbitant prices to a shop.

                      1957 Studebaker Champion 2 door. Staten Island, New York.
                      1957 Studebaker Champion 2 door. Staten Island, New York.

                      "Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think." -Albert Einstein

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                      • #12
                        Just to be clear, my covers are only show correct for GT's and Avanti's, nice fit, but not stock looking enough for show on others.

                        JDP/Maryland
                        63 R2 SuperHawk (Caesar)
                        spent to date $54664,75
                        64 R2 GT (Sid)
                        spent to date $62,439.30
                        63 Lark 2 door
                        51 Commander
                        39 Coupe express
                        39 Coupe express (rod)

                        JDP Maryland

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have done the seats on my Challenger, GT Hawk and Champ truck. And I went at it the same way I make a hole in the wall. Start banging my head against it until the bricks start to chip. After the third time I can make a pretty good hole!

                          What I'm trying to say is don't be afraid to take on uhpholstery work. Find a used, semi-heavy duty walking foot sewing machine. Get someone to show you the basics and start playing around. Find a shop that sells uhpholstery material, not the neighborhood fabric store that sells to the housewives(I know that's not PC). They will sell you the correct foam blocks, and the good heavy-duty material that will hold up. And like the other guy said, carve up the foam to shape.

                          Now, I do drivers, not show cars. But I think anybody can do good Lark seats if they try. And in my case I got to where I could make a pretty good set of seats for my Hawk.

                          Here are some tips I'd like to pass along. First, I pick up extra seats when I can. Good seats where the springs are not rusted. Usually Lark seats. Then I take them all apart and I free the springs from the middle of seat; the ones with the least wear. Then I take the seat I'm working on and in the areas where the springs are weak I will coil in a second spring. It's usually the area where the driver sits. And in that area I will have six or maybe eight 'double' springs. Makes it nice and firm again. Second, really build up the outside corners of the seat bottoms. The part where people slide in and out of the car. Those areas get compessed down really quickly.

                          And don't be afraid to try!

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