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PANEL SEALANT (seam sealant) replacement in engine bay - 1950 2r5 pickup

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  • #16
    Originally posted by rcke View Post
    the panel sealant (seam sealant) in the engine bay of my truck is dry and loose and falling out in chunks (could be worse i guess)

    i don't mind paying for the 2k type products and a new caulking gun to go with it, I just would like to hear from those who have experience in the various products and are happy with the results after perhaps as much as a few years has gone by without problems

    and if you're a 1k fan, please chime in too

    thanks
    Hey welcome to our world! I finally got around to reading your thread and the comments. Having owned one of these C cab trucks for over four decades, I can honestly say, it has been my most reliable, and enjoyable Studebaker. You don't say what your plans and use are for your truck. My opinion...unless you plan to restore it to a rarely used "Museum" piece, I wouldn't fret every tiny "original" detail. Especially, for stuff that is not very often seen or noticed.

    If you think about it, like all other manufacturers, Studebaker built these vehicles to be sold for a profit. In doing so, most components were purchased from the low bidder, as long as the stuff met "MINIMUM" requirements for the application. This "fender welt," is no different. It wasn't that it was the "best" stuff for the job, but, it provided a functional seal, and served as a sound proofing between the panels. For its time, it was the "traditional" product, and relatively cheap. If you plan to dismantle the truck, and reassemble it with new original style material for cosmetic reasons, I think that's fine. But, in all the years since then, great numbers of materials that could perform the task have been brought to market.

    To this very day, there are assembly line specialists who's job is to push, manipulate, bend, or shim body panels in place for "fit & finish." The era of our cars, even more so. Evidenced by so many slotted holes in the body panels. Therefore, I would think long & hard, before removing or loosening a fender or body panel to replace this seal. Rather, I would clean the area, and find a product to re-seal in place. If you want to duplicate "the look," I'd find and glue some similar diameter looking round rubber to the seam, and call it done.

    It is your truck to enjoy, and any method you choose might end up being a breeze. But, some of these projects can be as frustrating as attempting to reinstall the feathers on a plucked chicken.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #17
      Originally posted by rcke View Post
      Skip - even with help from both you and Karterfred88 - I am coming up empty. The websites/companies cannot match up the product numbers or the terminology from the old catalogs (2003) that are being referenced.

      Would you be able to do me a favor and take a photo of the material that you have in hand so that I can email the various companies and attach your photo to inquire about current availablilty of something that comes close ?

      Thanks much
      Won't be back and able to look at the pieces I have until after the Intl Meet. It looks just like standard fender welt, but with a round foam core instead of smaller plastic tube that is usually used in fender welt. Did Restoration Specialties say they didn't carry it any more?
      Skip Lackie

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
        Won't be back and able to look at the pieces I have until after the Intl Meet. It looks just like standard fender welt, but with a round foam core instead of smaller plastic tube that is usually used in fender welt. Did Restoration Specialties say they didn't carry it any more?
        Just to confirm that Restoration Specialties and Supply part number NX504BLK truck innerseal (see post #9 above) is a near-perfect match for Stude part number 1690X2. It now costs $4 a foot.
        Skip Lackie

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