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Differential Summary - Kinds and sizes used by Studebaker

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  • #16
    I think that most guys know this, but some may not. The easiest way to determine if diff. is a TT is to jack the car with both wheels off the ground. Now just turn one wheel, in either direction, and watch which way the other wheel turns. If both wheels turn in the same direction it is a TT, if the other turns in the opposite direction it is not.

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    • #17
      Thank for the tip on TT. I also understand you can take the level check plug out, and if there is no room, it is a TT.

      In summary, I am looking for a raised casting for the model, and a tag (hopefully) for the ratio.

      What were the different widths? Say, between brake backing plates or between U-Bolt Mounts?

      What are the main differences between 23, 27 and 44?

      Aside from the TT and 44 being more rare (and valuable I presume) are the other differentials hard to find?

      - - - Updated - - -

      Thank for the tip on TT. I also understand you can take the level check plug out, and if there is no room, it is a TT.

      In summary, I am looking for a raised casting for the model, and a tag (hopefully) for the ratio.

      What were the different widths? Say, between brake backing plates or between U-Bolt Mounts?

      What are the main differences between 23, 27 and 44?

      Aside from the TT and 44 being more rare (and valuable I presume) are the other differentials hard to find?

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
        For your information Paul, these important Model Numbers can be found RAISED in the Casting on the Web between the Right Hand Axle tube and the Center "Pumpkin" usually on the Rear side but sometimes on the Forward side.

        The Cars use 23, 27 and 44. 1958 is when they stopped using the H.D. Model 44 on all V8's.
        After '58, you only find them on 289's, Taxis, Police and Station Wagons, of course that includes Avanti, Jet thrust & Super Jet Thrust Cars.

        Also Note: not ALL 1965's have Flanged Axles, it was a Mid-year change.
        And you're 100% correct. About 5 years ago I remember looking at a 1965 Studebaker sedan with the 283 and a swapped in 4 spd, it had the tapered axle rear end, I don't remember if it was the 27 or 44 model diff in all fairness.
        --------------------------------------

        Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

        Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

        "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

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        • #19
          About those 2.88 ratio rear gears. Does that ring gear bolt up to the 3.07 through 3.73 carrier? Are they still available and from whom?
          Dean




          CLEM

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Clem64 View Post
            About those 2.88 ratio rear gears. Does that ring gear bolt up to the 3.07 through 3.73 carrier? Are they still available and from whom?
            Yes, they work with that carrier. Back in the day, hundreds of Sunbeam Tiger owners were throwing away the OEM 2.88 and replacing it with 3.54 and lower. Jaguar also used it.

            jack vines
            PackardV8

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            • #21
              Originally posted by 63t-cab View Post
              Never knew about the 2:88, aside of being Automatic what Model would this have been offered in ?
              Mine showing differential ratio on 1949 2R5 Studebaker pickup truck. 2.33 something?!?!

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              • #22
                Originally posted by terrydoc View Post

                Mine showing differential ratio on 1949 2R5 Studebaker pickup truck. 2.33 something?!?!
                Probably not. Standard ratio on a 2R5 was 4.89. 4.09 and 4.55 were optional.
                Skip Lackie

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by terrydoc View Post

                  Mine showing differential ratio on 1949 2R5 Studebaker pickup truck. 2.33 something?!?!
                  Lol! You would have to throw your Passenger out to get that little 169 c.i.d. 6 to start moving, forget carrying a Load!

                  You MAY be reading part of, the Pinion tooth count over the Ring Gear Gear tooth count rather than the Final Ratio.
                  StudeRich
                  Second Generation Stude Driver,
                  Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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