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289 Valve Stem Seals

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Keller View Post
    RE Valve Guides: My 289 was also supplied w/ guides requiring positive seals - If your guides have a groove near the top (rather than the tapered top using umbrella type seals) then the guides need positive Seals - Umbrella seals should not be used w/ this type of guide. The tech rep for the seals stated that Positive seals should only be used with high oil flow engines (such as w/ a high capacity oil pump) normally found only on high performance engines - They are not recommended on "street" engines due to the limitation of oil to the valve stem (possibly why some users have experienced extra valve stem wear).

    Rather than replace the guides w/ standard umbrella seal (stock) guides, a suggestion was made to file a VERY shallow groove, top to bottom inside the seal w/ a VERY small jewelers file (such are used by hobby modelers. The groove should only be approx. 1/32" deep - Any more and it might allow too much oil through (I filed two grooves, 180 degrees apart "just in case" one of the grooves becomes blocked -This was not a recommendation, but my own decision that I would rather have a bit of oil consumption rather than possibly extra valve stem wear). The engine has not been in use yet, so there are not actual results to report. Basically, any time an engine is modified, there is some question of the final results. Best of luck whatever you decide.

    Paul TK
    Your results may vary, but positive seals have been the industry standard for street engines for decades.

    jack vines

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Keller
    replied
    RE Valve Guides: My 289 was also supplied w/ guides requiring positive seals - If your guides have a groove near the top (rather than the tapered top using umbrella type seals) then the guides need positive Seals - Umbrella seals should not be used w/ this type of guide. The tech rep for the seals stated that Positive seals should only be used with high oil flow engines (such as w/ a high capacity oil pump) normally found only on high performance engines - They are not recommended on "street" engines due to the limitation of oil to the valve stem (possibly why some users have experienced extra valve stem wear).

    Rather than replace the guides w/ standard umbrella seal (stock) guides, a suggestion was made to file a VERY shallow groove, top to bottom inside the seal w/ a VERY small jewelers file (such are used by hobby modelers. The groove should only be approx. 1/32" deep - Any more and it might allow too much oil through (I filed two grooves, 180 degrees apart "just in case" one of the grooves becomes blocked -This was not a recommendation, but my own decision that I would rather have a bit of oil consumption rather than possibly extra valve stem wear). The engine has not been in use yet, so there are not actual results to report. Basically, any time an engine is modified, there is some question of the final results. Best of luck whatever you decide.

    Paul TK

    Leave a comment:


  • 345 DeSoto
    replied
    I had two really stuck pistons and had to take the engine apart to get them out. It's a shame, because everything is in such nice condition. I had to beat them out from the bottom, and ruined them all...

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    The Rods are Studebaker H.D. Clevite 77 Tri-Metal Bearings used in Avanti and H.D. Truck Engines, the BEST that USED to be available, made in USA.

    The Mains are also NOS or original Studebaker Standard bearings, someone really knew what he was doing who built this engine, or it was the Factory!

    Why is it again that it is being torn apart?

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  • 345 DeSoto
    replied
    DOOFUS - The Main bearings have #527108, and the Rod bearings have #685053...

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  • doofus
    replied
    345desoto check the back of the rod/main brgs for a brand or Stude part no. a factory bearing would help your case a whole lot. When replacing bearings i always try for Clevite 77's. luck Doofus

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  • willyj
    replied
    I agree with doofus. Leave them alone. I have replaced Stude valve seals with ones from NAPA because the original ones get hard with age. The ones from NAPA are nothing special but work ok.

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  • Daytona
    replied
    I just replaced mine and you can get at the Napa store and they are cheaper than SI.

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  • 345 DeSoto
    replied
    STUDEGARY - If it was such a "high mileage" engine, how do you account for the fact that the crank mains/rods are STD, right on the button, and there is no hint of a ridge on any of the cylinders, the cam and lifters show no signs of wear, and the fiber cam gear is like new? Could be that the owner had better valve seals installed? Some people might find a good deal, once in a while, in spite of what you may or may not believe or agree with.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Another point in support that your engine/car is not extremely low mileage.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeHall
    replied
    Originally posted by doofus View Post
    These are positive stem seals,guide tops are machined to fit. they take a tool or deep well socket to install and a plastic sleeve on valve stem to protect them from cutting on valve keeper grooves. leave'em be.Luck Doofus
    Years ago, I was advised by several machinists that the teflon version of these will actually wear the valve stem down. Not sure they are even made of teflon anymore though
    Still true: Yes? No?
    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • doofus
    replied
    These are positive stem seals,guide tops are machined to fit. they take a tool or deep well socket to install and a plastic sleeve on valve stem to protect them from cutting on valve keeper grooves. leave'em be.Luck Doofus

    Leave a comment:


  • 345 DeSoto
    replied
    STUDERICH - That's what they look like! And no, I was hoping I wouldn't need to remove them...they appear brand new. Thanks, Rich...again.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    They appear to be the Standard for all Engines, replacements; Perfect Circle I think their name was "Perfect Seal" (not sure) that Machinists have been using for decades requiring machining the Guides.
    You do not want to remove them.

    Leave a comment:


  • SScopelli
    replied
    This person on ebay has made many sizes of positive seals that will easily fit Stude engines without machining of the guide..

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/251812860054

    Get the dimensions and search his "Other Items" to find the right ones.

    Leave a comment:

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