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289 Valve Stem Seals

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  • #16
    345desoto check the back of the rod/main brgs for a brand or Stude part no. a factory bearing would help your case a whole lot. When replacing bearings i always try for Clevite 77's. luck Doofus

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    • #17
      DOOFUS - The Main bearings have #527108, and the Rod bearings have #685053...

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      • #18
        The Rods are Studebaker H.D. Clevite 77 Tri-Metal Bearings used in Avanti and H.D. Truck Engines, the BEST that USED to be available, made in USA.

        The Mains are also NOS or original Studebaker Standard bearings, someone really knew what he was doing who built this engine, or it was the Factory!

        Why is it again that it is being torn apart?
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #19
          I had two really stuck pistons and had to take the engine apart to get them out. It's a shame, because everything is in such nice condition. I had to beat them out from the bottom, and ruined them all...

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          • #20
            RE Valve Guides: My 289 was also supplied w/ guides requiring positive seals - If your guides have a groove near the top (rather than the tapered top using umbrella type seals) then the guides need positive Seals - Umbrella seals should not be used w/ this type of guide. The tech rep for the seals stated that Positive seals should only be used with high oil flow engines (such as w/ a high capacity oil pump) normally found only on high performance engines - They are not recommended on "street" engines due to the limitation of oil to the valve stem (possibly why some users have experienced extra valve stem wear).

            Rather than replace the guides w/ standard umbrella seal (stock) guides, a suggestion was made to file a VERY shallow groove, top to bottom inside the seal w/ a VERY small jewelers file (such are used by hobby modelers. The groove should only be approx. 1/32" deep - Any more and it might allow too much oil through (I filed two grooves, 180 degrees apart "just in case" one of the grooves becomes blocked -This was not a recommendation, but my own decision that I would rather have a bit of oil consumption rather than possibly extra valve stem wear). The engine has not been in use yet, so there are not actual results to report. Basically, any time an engine is modified, there is some question of the final results. Best of luck whatever you decide.

            Paul TK

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Paul Keller View Post
              RE Valve Guides: My 289 was also supplied w/ guides requiring positive seals - If your guides have a groove near the top (rather than the tapered top using umbrella type seals) then the guides need positive Seals - Umbrella seals should not be used w/ this type of guide. The tech rep for the seals stated that Positive seals should only be used with high oil flow engines (such as w/ a high capacity oil pump) normally found only on high performance engines - They are not recommended on "street" engines due to the limitation of oil to the valve stem (possibly why some users have experienced extra valve stem wear).

              Rather than replace the guides w/ standard umbrella seal (stock) guides, a suggestion was made to file a VERY shallow groove, top to bottom inside the seal w/ a VERY small jewelers file (such are used by hobby modelers. The groove should only be approx. 1/32" deep - Any more and it might allow too much oil through (I filed two grooves, 180 degrees apart "just in case" one of the grooves becomes blocked -This was not a recommendation, but my own decision that I would rather have a bit of oil consumption rather than possibly extra valve stem wear). The engine has not been in use yet, so there are not actual results to report. Basically, any time an engine is modified, there is some question of the final results. Best of luck whatever you decide.

              Paul TK
              Your results may vary, but positive seals have been the industry standard for street engines for decades.

              jack vines
              PackardV8

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