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  • swvalcon
    replied
    I was saving parts to build a motor for a champ pickup but looks like it will get a SBC.

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  • SScopelli
    replied
    What "was" this going to go in?

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  • swvalcon
    replied
    looks like the whole thing goes to China.

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  • swvalcon
    replied
    No engine sat in the car open with no intake, no hood in AZ for years. Block is going to China just wanted to save the crank and the cam shaft. If they don't want to come out with out to much work they will go there also. Cast or forged the numbers are part of the crank not a number put in on the line with a metal stamp.

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  • SScopelli
    replied
    So was that chain attached to it for a boat anchor? Looks like it sat at the bottom of a lake for some time. I would not waist any effort on that engine. There are so many out there in way better shape. You can get to most oil galleys, but some, impossible. The rust that is in the hidden ones will only cause you grief later on. Best thing is to China make iPhones out of it.

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    Originally posted by swvalcon View Post
    I'll look again tomorrow but the 5374 are the raised numbers cast onto one of the counterweights. which most times is a crank cast number but there maybe another one under all the gunk.
    It's a minor but significant technical point; all Stude V8 crankshafts are forged and the numbers thereon are forged onto them and not cast into them

    jack vines

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  • swvalcon
    replied
    I'll look again tomorrow but the 5374 are the raised numbers cast onto one of the counterweights. which most times is a crank cast number but there maybe another one under all the gunk.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    You are missing the Two or Three most important casting numbers on the Crank.
    Studebaker Drawing Numbers are 6 or 7 Digit Numeric.

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  • swvalcon
    replied
    Tried to remove the cam today and had to take air chisel to the cam gear as there is no way to turn engine over. It was pretty well eaten away and fell apart easy. Left just the piece right around the cam and if somehow I can get it out I will remove that. All main caps are off and everything looks good so far. Will have to take the cutting torch to the rods at about the center of the beams to get the crank out of the block then I can remove the rod caps. As bad as the rust looks I think most is from water and dirt stuck to the oil and may clean up easier then a guy would think. Crank number is 5374, Block casting number is 535601 and engine number is P 88997.

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  • wittsend
    replied
    Originally Posted by RadioRoy Will any of the rust removal products damage the bearing surfaces beyond repair?



    Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
    Yes, if the rust pits go deep enough, the result is clean pits.
    jack vines
    But in that case I'd think it is fair to say the rust itself (and to be more exact the oxidation process) did the damage, - not the rust removal product. The rust removal product only revealed it. Perhaps a strong acid and a long period of time will remove good metal (why they acid dip race car bodies), but my experience with the generally available products they only interacted with the oxidized metal in the typical time it took for them to be effective. Hopefully there is a chemist here who knows the subject in greater detail.


    I'd agree with Mr. Vines about the 302 crank. As long as a defect isn't predominant (creating a flat spot) nor has sharp edges it shouldn't be a problem. People groove cranks for oiling purposes and that much larger absence of metal typically is not deemed an issue.
    Last edited by wittsend; 05-18-2016, 01:27 PM.

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
    Will any of the rust removal products damage the bearing surfaces beyond repair?
    Yes, if the rust pits go deep enough, the result is clean pits. Having said that, I once pulled the crank out of a '69 Ford 302". One journal had a large, deep pit in it from original and there was so sign of bearing damage.

    No, if it's just surface rust.

    Maybe, this is one which should be taken to a professional.

    jack vines

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  • wittsend
    replied
    Something I've used to remove rust from a file (and not damage the cutting teeth) is to immerse the part is a washing soda (sodium carbonate) solution. Then you hook a battery charger to a sacrificial piece of iron (+) and the crank itself (-), don't let these parts touch http://antique-engines.com/electrol.asp. The rust is then transferred off the crank without any abrasion. I don't believe that the chemical processes necessarily damage the good steel. But..., it typically does remove ALL the rust and can give the impression of damage over say, wire brushing that can shin up rust that remains and gives the illusion that the metal is better than it actually is.

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  • RadioRoy
    replied
    Will any of the rust removal products damage the bearing surfaces beyond repair?

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  • 64studeavanti
    replied
    Regarding post #7, I believe that you are talking about Evapo-Rust http://www.evapo-rust.com/. Definitely a great product.

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  • jackb
    replied
    take it to a good shop and let them try to save it for you.......

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