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Key differences between Studebaker 289 and more common engines when rebuilding

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  • GrumpyOne
    replied
    Originally posted by doofus View Post
    Wrist pin pinch bolt, they have to be right or you can score the cylinder. Ediger method works for me. using home made pin installer place pin,rod and piston together. once happy with pinch bolt torque flip piston over and sharply tap slotted end of pinch bolt several times,re-torque nut, repeat 'till pinch bolt doesn't tighten up anymore. torque is 20-25 ft. lbs. Luck Doofus
    Absolutely! I've had to retorque up to a half dozen times to achieve the correct level.

    As an aside regarding the removal of the front hub from the crankshaft, I use the laws of physics in that I use a hair dryer or small propane torch to heat the hub to no more than 200°, it will literally pull of in your gloved hands. Same to re-install...

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  • doofus
    replied
    Wrist pin pinch bolt, they have to be right or you can score the cylinder. Ediger method works for me. using home made pin installer place pin,rod and piston together. once happy with pinch bolt torque flip piston over and sharply tap slotted end of pinch bolt several times,re-torque nut, repeat 'till pinch bolt doesn't tighten up anymore. torque is 20-25 ft. lbs. Luck Doofus

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  • Stunt
    replied
    Thanks for all this, everyone, I appreciate it much. And if anyone else out there has anything more to add, I'm still listening.

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  • karterfred88
    replied
    If there is a need or desire to install new valve seats, get the right hardened seats from a vendor not some supplier who may have the wrong info on right size, and be very careful removing and installing the new ones. You might do a search for some updates on the forum, such as positive seal valve stem seals, and modifications for a "real" front crank seal, as it is going to be apart anyway, will help keep your garage floor and driveway "oil free". I'm sure there will be other suggestions. Keep in mind many of the methods used in the manual, such as piston fitting with a feeler gauge, are not longer used, and the material in the pistons may be different and require slightly different clearances than those listed. If at anytime he asks "should I" ask here first, there are many experts on here to help.

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  • JoeHall
    replied
    Tell him to inspect, but check with you before line boring/honing the block. If he goes at it like a SBC, he could screw up the clearance between crank & cam gears. When he tells you the results of his inspection, seek advice here before just telling him to go ahead and, "clean it up". If it is not drastically out of alignment, I'd leave it as is. The main bearings will align themselves, with a little more/less wear, from end to end. If you screw up gear clearance, that's a real PITA.

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  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    SLEDGE HAMMER MARKS..??! Oh the humanity..!
    Though I have to admit, when I was younger, MUCH younger, I did use a combination of a hammer and a center stud and nut to install them.

    Stunt, yes to both of your questions.

    Mike

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    Remove the plugs in the end of the rocker shafts and brush the inside clean.

    Hot tank the rockers and then blow air through the oil passage. Make sure it's going to allow oil through there.

    Front hub should be removed and installed with the correct puller. I've seen too many with sledge hammer marks on them.

    jack vines

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Be sure to remove the oil pressure regulator piston before hot tank/degreasing.

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  • wdills
    replied
    Make sure he puts the plug back in the oil gallery at the rear of the engine drivers side. It is recessed 3 or 4 inches back behind a freeze plug. I had a guy with similar reputation rebuild my 289. He forgot that plug and I ruined a freshly rebuilt engine.

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  • Key differences between Studebaker 289 and more common engines when rebuilding

    I know there's 2 or 3 things someone rebuilding a Studebaker 289 ('61) should know, that are slightly different from rebuilding more common engines from that era. On another forum, I gleaned this:
    - Cinch bolts on the wrist pins
    - Crank end play is set with shims
    Is this correct info? And are there other things people would add to this? Taking my engine to a guy who's been rebuilding for 30 or 40 years, has a solid reputation around here and has done a couple of Studes many years ago. I have the shop manual which I'll leave with him, but would like to give him as much solid information as possible. Any help is appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Dave
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