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Stromberg WW fuel evaporation

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  • T.J lavallee
    replied
    Originally posted by TWChamp View Post
    If you use the electric pump only for priming, make sure it allows the fuel to flow through when off, or you might be left scratching your head.
    Good point...hadn't considered that. Thanks.

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    If you use the electric pump only for priming, make sure it allows the fuel to flow through when off, or you might be left scratching your head.

    Leave a comment:


  • rockne10
    replied
    You want your electric pump close to the tank, as it is a "pusher". For the purpose of priming I would wire it to a simple contact switch that supplies power only when being pushed. You should be able to hear the pump run, and detect resistance when the carb float shuts the needle valve. Then engage your starter. My experience with my '51.

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  • T.J lavallee
    replied
    Originally posted by karterfred88 View Post
    Personally, I doubt sealing the pot metal either from the out side or inside, will help. If you have thoroughly checked for leaks, including the bowl to throttle plate gasket area and have taken the carb off, filled it with gas and let it sit off the car and it doesn't leak, yet the bowls still go empty, and the surface of the carb isn't "sweating" fuel your wasting your time. Insulate the carb base to manifold attachment, put in an electric fuel pump to prime the carb only, and live with it. Todays gas, alcohol laced or not, is formulated to be very volatile. In a sealed system that works fine as the vapors are stored and then drawn back into the system, and many FI systems are pressurized, including the tank so loss by evaporation is minimal. Not what we have, some areas of the country don't have this problem with their fuel formulations, others have it. Carb float bowls and our gas tanks are open to the air and evaporation will occur, the hotter and drier the air the faster it occurs--that's why the EPA keeps trying to take our cars off the road.
    This makes a lot of sense. Guess I'll go with the electric pump for priming and shut it off after the engine starts. Where is the best place to mount the pump, at the tank or near the engine bay?

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  • karterfred88
    replied
    Personally, I doubt sealing the pot metal either from the out side or inside, will help. If you have thoroughly checked for leaks, including the bowl to throttle plate gasket area and have taken the carb off, filled it with gas and let it sit off the car and it doesn't leak, yet the bowls still go empty, and the surface of the carb isn't "sweating" fuel your wasting your time. Insulate the carb base to manifold attachment, put in an electric fuel pump to prime the carb only, and live with it. Todays gas, alcohol laced or not, is formulated to be very volatile. In a sealed system that works fine as the vapors are stored and then drawn back into the system, and many FI systems are pressurized, including the tank so loss by evaporation is minimal. Not what we have, some areas of the country don't have this problem with their fuel formulations, others have it. Carb float bowls and our gas tanks are open to the air and evaporation will occur, the hotter and drier the air the faster it occurs--that's why the EPA keeps trying to take our cars off the road.

    Leave a comment:


  • tim333
    replied
    I bet there was a nice gas smell in the kitchen too.

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    My 1950 Champion has the same problem. When the car sets for about two days or more the carb will be dry. I took the carb off and went through it several times and found no problems. I finally took the carb into the kitchen last winter and set it over a bucket, and had fuel running to the carb. Not a drop of fuel went into the bucket, and the carb retained it's fuel in the bowl for several days. The fuel we have to use today isn't the same good fuel we could use in the 60's and 70's. Even the good gas without ethanol evaporates very quickly.

    I wouldn't try painting or coating the inside of the carb.

    Leave a comment:


  • doofus
    replied
    TJ, you might try appliance epoxy on carb body internals , drys super hard. plan b would be DP epoxy primer its nearest to impossible to get off,lacquer thinner won't touch it once cured. Luck Doofus

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  • T.J lavallee
    replied
    Thanks for the information. I researched and found Home Depot sells silver tinted spray cans of zinc chromate coating. Guess I'll give it a try. I know the fuel is not boiling out from heat as I can re-start the engine anytime during an eight hour period, for example, no matter how hot (normal running temp) the engine may be. If the vehicle sits for more than two days I have to prime the carb to start it. There are absolutely no fuel leaks in the entire system. Guess it just evaporates more quickly with ethanol and this 100 plus desert heat and the fact that the metal in the carb is old and probably porous. I'll give it a try. Thanks again.

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  • jclary
    replied
    This subject comes around from time to time. Here's a link to an older thread covering a good bit of possibilities. Perhaps it is worth reviewing.

    http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0LEV...NwgrA37upm2s4-

    Leave a comment:


  • rockne10
    replied
    Originally posted by SilentRon View Post
    This may not help with the fuel evaporation problem; however, I prefer non-ethanol fuel in my vintage rides. It costs a little more, but for me it's worth it.
    Getting harder and harder to find that. Best to add a couple ounces of Marvel Mystery Oil to every ten gallons of fuel.

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  • SilentRon
    replied
    This may not help with the fuel evaporation problem; however, I prefer non-ethanol fuel in my vintage rides. It costs a little more, but for me it's worth it. Our fuel systems were not designed for ethanol.

    www.pure-gas.org

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    Is the fuel evaporating, or is it boiling over from heat soak when you stop the engine. This is a common problem with the gas we have to put up with these days. In the 60's and 70's I never had a fuel related problem with any of my Studebakers, which were mostly 1950 Commanders and a 1952 232 V8.

    Leave a comment:


  • rockne10
    replied
    I believe T-bow has them zinc-chromated. He kept my '33 original with a black zinc chromate.Click image for larger version

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  • karterfred88
    replied
    I would guess a plating of the carb body would work (like zinc chromate). Varnish is easily dissolved by alcohol and some components of gasoline, so it probably wouldn't make a good sealant. Perhaps an epoxy but I believe plating is the accepted way to seal porous metals.

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