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63 Daytona wants to die when put in gear

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  • #16
    When I've had this problem it has been either a vacuum leak or the timing is way off. Fred's right it may get enough gas to idle but starves with any load.

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    • #17
      bubbastude;
      The heat riser is a valve located on the bottom of the right side exhaust manifold; right where the exhaust pipe connects to it. The valve has a weight and spring. When the engine is cold the valve should be closed and as the engine warms up the spring looses its tension and the valve opens. The valve should also open as you rev up the engine. When the engine is cold you should be able to move the valve between open and closed. About 90 degrees. The purpose of the valve is to heat the base of the carburetor to aid in fuel evaporation when the engine is cold.
      As far as the location of the vacuum gauge connection. If the car has power brakes; when the hose leaves the intake manifold (behind the carburetor) is a good point to measure the intake manifold vacuum. If the car does not have power brakes the is a plug in the back of the intake manifold that can be removed to measure the vacuum.
      At idle it should be around 17 inches. Usually the vacuum line that goes to the distributor is ported vacuum; not manifold vacuum and will not give a correct reading at idle. The vacuum line that goes to the distributor should be disconnected and plugged when setting the ignition timing.
      Ron

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      • #18
        Originally posted by rstrasser View Post
        /Cut/The purpose of the valve is to heat the base of the carburetor to aid in fuel evaporation when the engine is cold./Cut/
        Actually equally as important is the OTHER reason for a Heat Riser, there is a Automatic Choke Heater System also built into the Exhaust Manifold to heat up the Automatic Choke and turn it off.

        Your "Replacement Carb." may not function properly on this Engine unless it's correct Model is Carter Type "AS", these '59-'62 carbs. are MUCH better than the '63-'64 Carter RBS.
        Last edited by StudeRich; 05-17-2016, 01:11 PM.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #19
          from what I can tell the heat riser is quite rusty, should I be able to move the counter weight?
          sigpic
          1956 Commander parts car
          1953 Commander Coupe
          1965 Commander 4-Door w/14,000 original miles
          1956 President Classic
          1963 Daytona Convertible

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          • #20
            Yes, it should move freely. You may try some light hammer blows onto the axle to free it, with penetrating oil of course.
            sigpic

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            • #21
              If the heat riser is stuck the 2 bolt's holding the assy to the manifold can be removed and the weight,spring ,axle & flapper can be removed,eventually. Believe "Repair Kits" are still around. You might try another carb and check fuel pump operation. Luck Doofus

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              • #22
                Does it bog down in Reverse or just Drive? Has the float level on the carb been checked?

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                • #23
                  Try removing the rubber line from the frame to the fuel pump, using a vice grips the temporarily close the line and keep it from leaking. Start the engine and allow to run till it dies from lack of fuel. Reinstall the fuel hose and clamp. Go to the carb with air cleaner off, and using a spray can of carb cleaner fill the carb through the vent tube till it overflows. Let it sit for 15-20 minutes. With the choke plate held open look inside the carb throat and move the throttle rod back and forth looking for a spray into the carb throat. Keeping the choke plate open and throttle wide open crank the engine over several times till it tries to start. Let go of the gas pedal. Re try starting till it starts. Once running up the RPM to about 2500, while turning off the ignition, holding the throttle wide open stuff a rag in the carb throat and choke it to death. Remove the rag, let it sit for awhile and restart. This will pull any small junk through the jets, loosen any stuck metering rods and maybe help. If it does help but doesn't cure it, try repeating. If it doesn't get any better after a time or two, pull and rebuild the carb per the manual. looking for any tiny bits blocking a jet. Good luck.

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                  • #24
                    see post #18, then re-read it. I once rebuilt an RBS 3 times with exhaustion. I could get it to run OK when warm, but cold starts were almost impossible and warm re-starts were a roll of the dice....get an AS...

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