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Regarding 4 post Made in China lift:

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  • Mikado282
    replied
    Lots of cargo is lost each year and once in a while the ships themselves. Container ships and cruise ships today are pushing way over the envelope IMO. Never want to be on either.

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    Originally posted by sweetolbob View Post
    It's the adjustment and upper support for the step plate that engages the dogs. I'll bet we'd all be surprised at how much cargo rests with the fishes after looking at the height they stack those containers on the large ships.
    I agree. Sometimes you have to wonder how those ships even stay upright.

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  • sweetolbob
    replied
    Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
    Question: What does the vertical bolt do on your top plate on your lift?
    Mine only has one hole on top
    It's the adjustment and upper support for the step plate that engages the dogs. I'll bet we'd all be surprised at how much cargo rests with the fishes after looking at the height they stack those containers on the large ships.

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Question: What does the vertical bolt do on your top plate on your lift?
    Mine only has one hole on top (for the cable end)

    BTW... This is the second 4 post lift I ordered.
    The first lift never showed up.
    When I asked where it was, I was told it was in about 15,000' of water somewhere in the Pacific.
    Seems the ship lost a container full of them


    Originally posted by sweetolbob View Post
    I think I'm liking my 8000 XLT import more all the time.

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]53951[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]53952[/ATTACH]

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  • sweetolbob
    replied
    Originally posted by TWChamp View Post

    Now you have two things to worry about. lol
    Not worried about that on mine, The lift has dogs that engage every 6" or so on the way up and anytime I'm under it it's setting on the steel engagement plates and not the cables. In fact, before I go under it, I push the cables to be sure there is some slack in all of them indicating the dogs are engaged.

    You are correct however that the crimped cable is of more concern than the mounting plates. Good point. Bob

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    Sure wish I had garage space and a 4 post hoist.

    I'd worry more about the crimp on the cable ends than the welds.

    Now you have two things to worry about. lol

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  • sweetolbob
    replied
    I think I'm liking my 8000 XLT import more all the time.

    Click image for larger version

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  • mch
    replied
    I'm the guy that posted the original "4 post lifts". There should be complete welding all around without any deficiencies. I don't feel a one inch or two inch weld is acceptable when there are 4 sides that are internal to the column. Just my opinion as I am not a welder, mechanic by trade or engineer. I am just the guy who bought "American made" with the promise of high quality and attention to detail. If you ever want a heart stopping event, just watch your beautiful 63 G.T. Hawk drop on an angle and view the grapefruit size dent in a fender as the plate and cable slams into an original car.
    I am available for a prvt msg. to discuss who the Texas manufacturer is.

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Couple questions/comments...
    My instruction sheet says not to stop the lowering with the valve, but to use the stops (or the ground at the bottom).
    I also know that the motor/pump does not like to start 'up' with a load on it.
    I always lower it until it rests on the stops.

    Also...
    Your lowering 'quickly' comment raised my eybrow (only hair I have left)...
    I timed the lowering on my lift (with a car on it).
    It takes a full 5 seconds per latch position going down.
    If yours is substantially faster than that, I would suspect a valve issue, or an orifice fitting issue.
    Just thinking out loud.




    Originally posted by GTHawk View Post
    <snip> This lift lowers very quickly so with a 9500 lb dually on it, if the operator were to stop quickly it put more than 2500 lbs of pressure on each post.
    <snip>

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    That's cool. If some weld adds to your comfort level... Go for it!

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  • GTHawk
    replied
    Just wanted to mention that while these welds may not be considered "spot welds" they were smaller than I was comfortable with. This lift lowers very quickly so with a 9500 lb dually on it, if the operator were to stop quickly it put more than 2500 lbs of pressure on each post.

    As you can see in the right photo, the top plate is cantilevered so that the weight of the lift causes the back of the plate to rise thus pulling on the welds. These welds were about the width of the bolts, themselves. I completely welded the support bracket to the top plate making it safer.

    The reason I ordered this from Complete Hydraulic is that I met the owner, William, at the Iola Car Show a few years ago and established a rapport with him. I am satisfied.

    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...attach/jpg.gifwohttp://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/images/attach/jpg.gifuld
    Attached Files
    Last edited by GTHawk; 05-08-2016, 05:17 PM.

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    I think you are worried about nothing... (if your lift is built in the same province in China)
    A one inch long weld is not a 'spot weld'. So this is addressing a one inch long weld.
    If one of your plates only had a 'tack weld' (done before finish welding, then that is a different story)
    Went out and looked at the plates on my 4 post lift...
    The three tabs on the plate all have a solid inch (or more) of weld on them.
    There is a cross bolt that goes through two of the tabs, and a bolt for the tab across from the cable hole.
    The cable hole is almost on the edge of the vertical tube so the thrust angle is almost straight down on top of the tube
    with maybe a little rotational force being applied to the plate due to the overhang (of maybe 1/2").
    With 'one inch' of weld on the tab, that would equate to about the thickness of the cable stud itself.
    Multiply the weld by three, and you have more material on the weld than the cable stud itself.
    Figure the max load (say 10,000 pounds, divided by four (posts) and you have 2500 pounds of cable pull on that plate.
    And since most of that 2500 pound pull is direct against the plate, and not a 'pull/extension' load against the weld(s)... That amount of weld should be fine.
    In conclusion, I'd be way more worried about the cheesy fitting the use to hook the hydraulic hose to the channel.
    That fitting gets twisted and tugged on every time you cycle the lift.
    Crack that fitting and 100% of it falls to the safety stops...if engaged.

    Just an opinion...

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  • mch
    replied
    Hi, glad to have read that my earlier post alerted a problem that resulted in a safety check. How scary that could have been if indeed your car dropped and that cap on top of the column swung around and killed you. Lucky for me, that cap was on the passenger side.
    Again, if anyone buys new, used, please check all welds. I should have initiated a product liability suit against the manufacturer in Texas, but decided posting and trying to get pictures and the article published would have resulted in a greater impact.
    Mark

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  • rowan
    replied
    I just purchased an Atlas 2 post overhead lift from Greg Smith Equipment - very pleased. No sales tax in Delaware ...

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  • Dan Timberlake
    replied
    Could you post pictures of the "problem" location?

    thanks

    Dan T

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