Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Steering Woes

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • jclary
    replied
    Originally posted by hobiejack11 View Post
    Checked the box, it is full of what looks to be gear oil, 90w or so. Tires are 6.50x16 bias ply. I am going to take it to Downriver Spring for an alignment check. They are about the only ones who know about the old stuff around here. I'll let you know what I find out.
    Your description of the steering gear lube, to me, is encouraging. If your gear box has 90wt. gear oil and it is in the box and not puddled on the ground, that is exceptional. It could be that the gear box has a "flowable" grease in it. I have found a "0" weight flowable grease I use. Most grease, if it don't flow, will pack away and end up wearing the worm gear and pawls. I've seen worm gears worn very thin, and the pawls flat-spotted when the box had been stuffed with thick grease.

    There is on many gearboxes, an adjustment. I believe it is to take up a bit of slack in the gear box itself, but it is very sensitive to slight adjustment. It is also not intended to compensate for a worn set of gears. It is an adjustment bolt with a jam nut. You loosen the jam nut and then adjust the center bolt. You could try to loosen the jam nut and fiddle with the center bolt to check and see if someone has cranked it in too much. Other than that, I have no suggestion you have not already considered. Seeing that you have experience with other manual steering behemoths, I'm confident it is just not because you have unrealistic expectations. I've driven some of the old H model Mack Trucks with the twin shifter duplex transmissions. Cowboying one of those around a mountain road while managing two gear levers is a real workout.

    Leave a comment:


  • hobiejack11
    replied
    Checked the box, it is full of what looks to be gear oil, 90w or so. Tires are 6.50x16 bias ply. I am going to take it to Downriver Spring for an alignment check. They are about the only ones who know about the old stuff around here. I'll let you know what I find out.

    Leave a comment:


  • jackb
    replied
    I'll bet on fat radials. Too big a footprint resulting in tough steering and the wanting to go to car shows on grass only !

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    I think I would suspect the Steering Gear or Column.
    The Camber is adjusted by Bending the Axle, but I do not know about the Caster.

    OK, I deleted my Post from your Other String and added it to this one that Jack Posted on.
    You should be able to go to the "Go Advanced" Mode and get the option to Delete your Dup. Post that happened Two Min. later, if you get it before someone Posts on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • PackardV8
    replied
    Check the steering box. Chances are it's completely dry of lubricant. They all wear the output seal and the grease leaks out. It's a real PITA to pull the steering wheel, pull the box and shaft, disassemble, install TWO seals and reassemble.

    As an interim fix, just shoot it full of moly chassis grease.

    What tires are you running? 99% of them have much larger, wider, stickier radials. The steering box was junk to begin with, so it has no additional capacity to handle wider tires.

    P.S. Just an after thought, does this truck use wedge shims between the spring and the axle to set the caster?
    Yes.

    jack vines

    Leave a comment:


  • hobiejack11
    started a topic Steering: Steering Woes

    Steering Woes

    I don't know what went wrong when i tried to post this yesterday but I will try again. When I was a youngster I learned to drive a semi in a White 3000 "Mustang". Some of you old Guys may remember them and if you ever had the pleasure of driving one you can attest to the heavy steering they had. I have a 1950 2R6 that I think would give one of them a run for its money. I have went through all of the old time procedures for lubricating the front end to no avail, jacking up the front to get the weight off of the wheels. forking grease through the kingpin bushings until I get clean lube out of the bushings and the thrust bearings as well. the same goes for the bell crank and the tie rod ends. she steers easy with the weight off of the wheels but once I let it down it would take a gorilla too steer it. Does anyone have any idea what the problem is? If I can't get it to steer a whole lot easier you will see it on the swap page. P.S. Just an after thought, does this truck use wedge shims between the spring and the axle to set the caster?
Working...
X