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new shifter for T96 O/D

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  • Transmission: new shifter for T96 O/D

    Just finished fitting the shift rods to my Scotsman's 3 speed OD. I had a Sparkomatic Truck Floor Shifter that I'd bought on eBay ages ago. Since I'd never had any luck shifting with the worn out column pieces in place, I went the least expensive way. Even though everyone says the cheap shifters are junk, I'd had good luck with them going all the way back to my 63 Falcon Sprint with the 3.03 three speed.
    Since there was all the OD stuff in the way (bolts, solenoid, lockout cable) it got mounted high but not further back. I thought my idea of making the rear mount by using stuff I had around (did have to order the 3.5" u-bolt though) helped get it going. The low/reverse shift rod took a few bends, but I was careful not to unbend anything, and it shifts just fine.
    It will all be going back in the Scotsman as soon as I get the rebuilt 185 cosmetically done, dial in the bellhousing and get the engine compartment back to body color like it should be. I may cut the "pickup truck" shift handle off and weld on a plate so I can pick the shifter handle that works best with the bench seat.

    Click image for larger version

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    sigpic
    JohnP, driving & reviving
    60 Lark & 58 Scotsman 4dr

  • #2
    Nice work. Very tidy.
    Skip Lackie

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    • #3
      That's a 6 cylinder transmission, and doesn't need anything heavy duty to shift it. Long as the shifter doesn't have plastic parts it'll be fine. Even if it does have plastic, considering the average miles per year for most Studes, it should last a few decades.

      Looks nice. Neatly done.

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      • #4
        Looks great & plenty of clearance for the o/d gizmos!

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        • #5
          I think you solved a problem i'm having with the shifter in my 56 wagon. Thanks loads, nice job. Doofus

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          • #6
            Very nicely done. My first Stude was a '56 Flight Hawk and I bought a floor shift conversion for $19.95 at the local Western Auto and used it for years. After the install, I swore never to do another in-car. All since then have been out on the bench. Your doing it on the bench was definitely the easier way to go.

            jack vines
            PackardV8

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            • #7
              Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
              Very nicely done. My first Stude was a '56 Flight Hawk and I bought a floor shift conversion for $19.95 at the local Western Auto and used it for years. After the install, I swore never to do another in-car. All since then have been out on the bench. Your doing it on the bench was definitely the easier way to go.

              jack vines
              I was never lucky enough to do one on the bench. It only takes a couple of days, a few skinned knuckles, and just the right curse words, repeated several times, to install one in the car.

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              • #8
                Yes , anyone doing a floor shift conversion will find that the job always comes out better if they happen to have an extra tranny they can throw up onto a workbench to custom fit the shifter....I've always been lucky enough to have that advantage!

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                • #9
                  That looks very good. About the only suggestion I would make is to drill and tap a hole in the top of the tailshaft housing for one bolt to prevent the U-bolt assembly from trying to rotate around the tailshaft due to stress and vibration.
                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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