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Possible way around the tapered axle rear drum removal drama.

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  • Brakes: Possible way around the tapered axle rear drum removal drama.

    http://www.crankshaftcoalition.com/w...ake_Conversion

    This refers to the 1964 down Mopars but; I'm wondering IF the same slide off drum conversion info may apply to 1965 down Stude rear drums? Just a thought.
    --------------------------------------

    Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

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  • #2
    Originally posted by 1962larksedan View Post
    http://www.crankshaftcoalition.com/w...ake_Conversion

    This refers to the 1964 down Mopars but; I'm wondering IF the same slide off drum conversion info may apply to 1965 down Stude rear drums? Just a thought.
    Done all the time-problem is finding a new drum if you need one, without a hub, that fits your car, been doing it on Avantis for a long time due to the cost of a replacement drum. I'm currently using a 74 Dodge Monaco on mine but still trying to locate a slight scuffing area once the lugs are in and drum slid in place. May be an axle problem, as one side works fine, the other a slight "wobble" even with a brand new hub. But the idea does work.

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    • #3
      Watch that wobble. If it is a tapered axle it may well be fatigued to the point that it could break at any time, leaving you three wheeled and no brakes. ...and possibly a destroyed quarter panel ...or worse.
      It's happened to me twice, and several others here have reported their experiences. If it's wobbling, do yourself a favor and find out why before taking it out on the highway.

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      • #4
        Done this procedure on my Lark and one thing was brought up, that they didn't address, and either did I, and that was the balance. Before the hub and drum are separated drill a locating hole and tap it and countersink it for a machine screw. This way if the hub and drum were balanced as a whole unit it will still be in the same relative location. That suggestion is fine except one has just changed the weight, ie. removing some material and adding the screw, into the equation. Other than that it is far easier to work, and travel, with the drums in this configuration. Now on any seriously long journey one could be concerned about the brakes not failing but not having access to them has been dealt with. I also once the wheel is replaced I don't tighten the nuts all the way until I have applied the brakes so as to center the drum, just incase there is any movement.

        This was also dealt with on Bob's site http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/...rakes_long.pdf on page 12 of Allan Tyler's brake conversion article.

        Len.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jessie J. View Post
          Watch that wobble. If it is a tapered axle it may well be fatigued to the point that it could break at any time, leaving you three wheeled and no brakes. ...and possibly a destroyed quarter panel ...or worse.
          It's happened to me twice, and several others here have reported their experiences. If it's wobbling, do yourself a favor and find out why before taking it out on the highway.
          Yes I know, that's why it's still parked in the garage. After finding the original hub had been "massaged" by welding and filing over the keyway, I was hoping that wasn't due to it having loosened and almost falling off, and just due to stupid installation with the key backwards, thus just a new hub installed. Just putting one new tapered axle in with a bearing doesn't seem the right way to go either. Converting to flanged axles solves the problem, but ii's a 4.09 TT which makes it useless for normal driving, the pinion leaks even with a new seal, there is so much backlash the driveline "rings" when engaging drive or reverse. Cost, cost, cost, it would be nice to find a converted rebuilt assembly ready to bolt in, at a price that was reasonable, without a $200.00 freight bill.

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          • #6
            Twice !
            The article mentions to use anti-sieze on the axle before installing the hub !
            That is a no no on Studebakers from everything I have read or heard.
            Is that how it's to be done on Mopars ?
            South Lompoc Studebaker

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            • #7
              They also mention to torque the nut at 120# as opposed to Stude's 170# which makes me wonder how much the Mopar axle is tapered if at all. Maybe this could account for the recommendation of anti-seize compound.

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              • #8
                You wouldn't want to use anti-sieze on a tapered axle if you plan on ever removing it again. If its to installed as permanent, then anti-sieze would make sense to help keep it in place and stable. In other words, this mod is essentially creating a flange axle wherein the hub will never need to be removed again. At least not in its foreseeable future. Still, if you are having that much trouble in the first place, just spend the money and get the flanged axles. And if your rear ratio is too high, fix it and drive the wheels off the car before we all die off and leave our undriven cars to the fate of the next generation.
                sals54

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                • #9
                  "If its to installed as permanent, then anti-sieze would make sense to help keep it in place and stable."

                  I thought the issue with any lubrication on the tapered assembly was that the lube would allow the hub to draw down too far onto the shaft, and split the hub?

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                  • #10
                    It absolutely without fail will do just that. Been there done it on a 47 Ford.

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